0
Lecture 5
Requirements and Models
UX Theory / IIT 2014 Spring
Class hours : Monday 4 pm – 7 pm
31st March
Homework
Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 2
Readings And
Critiques
Complete Flow
Model Sketch for
Your System
Complete the
Online ...
To Do List for Today
• Paper Seminar
• Flow Model Sketches
• Textbook
Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 3
To Do List for Today
• Seminar
– Core Research Ideas : Bring out some keywords or related technological
trends, background...
Next Week Reading List
• Download From YSCEC > User Experience > Books & Papers > Week
05 Reading
– Loeliger, E., & Stockm...
EXTRACTING INTERACTION DESIGN
REQUIREMENTS
Textbook Chapter 5.
Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 6
INTRODUCTION
Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 7
Figure 5-1
You are here; the chapter on extracting interaction requirements, withi...
INTRODUCTION
• Gap between Analysis and Design
– Information coming from contextual studies describes the work domain
but ...
INTRODUCTION
Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 9
Figure 5-2
Overview of the bridge to design.
NEEDS AND REQUIREMENTS: FIRST SPAN OF THE BRIDGE
• What Are “Requirements”?
• Requirements “Specifications”
– Detailed for...
FORMAL REQUIREMENTS EXTRACTION
• Walking the WAAD for Needs and Requirements
• Switching from Inductive to Deductive Reaso...
FORMAL REQUIREMENTS EXTRACTION
Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 12
Name of major feature or category
Name of second-level feature ...
FORMAL REQUIREMENTS EXTRACTION
• Continue the Process for the Whole WAAD
• Keep an Eye out for Emotional Impact Requiremen...
FORMAL REQUIREMENTS EXTRACTION
• Constraints as Requirements
• Prioritizing Requirements
• Taking Requirements Back to Cus...
ABRIDGED METHODS FOR REQUIREMENTS EXTRACTION
• Use the WAAD Directly as a Requirements Representation
• Anticipating Needs...
CONSTRUCTING DESIGN-INFORMING MODELS
Textbook Chapter 6.
Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 16
INTRODUCTION
Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 17
Figure 6-1
You are here; the chapter on constructing design informing models, wit...
DESIGN-INFORMING MODELS: SECOND SPAN OF THE BRIDGE
• What Are Design-Informing Models and How Are They Used?
– help integr...
SOME GENERAL “HOW TO” SUGGESTIONS
• Maintain Connections to Your Data
• Extract Inputs to Design-Informing Models
• Use Yo...
USER MODELS
• Work Roles
– Sub-roles
– Mediated work roles
– Envisioned work roles
– Relationship of work roles to
other c...
USER MODELS
• User Classes
– Knowledge- and skills-based characteristics
– Physiological characteristics
– Experience-base...
USER MODELS
Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 22
Figure 6-3
Relationships among work roles, sub-roles, and user class characteristi...
USER MODELS
• Social Models
– Identify active entities and represent as nodes
– Identify concerns and perspectives and rep...
USER MODELS
Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 24
Figure 6-4
Depiction of entities in the slideshow presentation social model. Thank...
USER MODELS
Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 25
Figure 6-4
Depiction of entities in the slideshow presentation social model. Thank...
USER MODELS
Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 26
Figure 6-6
Depiction of influences in the slideshow presentation social model.
USER MODELS
Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 27
Figure 6-7
Example social model for MUTTS.
USAGE MODELS
• Flow Model
– Creating a flow model diagram
– Flow models in the product perspective
– The envisioned flow m...
USAGE MODELS
Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 29
Figure 6-8
Example flow model from the slideshow presentation contextual inquiry....
USAGE MODELS
Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 30
Figure 6-9
Flow model of our version of MUTTS.
USAGE MODELS
Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 31
Figure 6-10
Envisioned flow model for the Ticket Kiosk System.
USAGE MODELS
Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 32
Figure 6-11
Hierarchical relationship of task A,
the super-task, and tasks B and ...
USAGE MODELS
Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 33
Figure 6-13
Sketch of the top levels of a possible hierarchical task inventory di...
USAGE MODELS
Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 34
Figure 6-14
Partial HTI for MUTTS “sell tickets” task.
USAGE MODELS
• Task Interaction Models
– Usage scenarios as narrative task interaction models
– Elements of scenarios.
• A...
USAGE MODELS
• Task Interaction Models
– Envisioned usage scenarios or design scenarios
– Step-by-step task interaction mo...
USAGE MODELS
Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 37
Figure 6-15
Branching and looping structures within step-by step task interaction...
USAGE MODELS
Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 38
Figure 6-16
Task interaction branching and looping
for MUTTS.
USAGE MODELS
Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 39
User Intention System Responsibility
1. Ticket seller to computer: Express intent...
WORK ENVIRONMENT MODELS
• Artifact Model
– Constructing the artifact model
• Physical Model
– Envisioned physical model
Le...
WORK ENVIRONMENT MODELS
Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 41
Figure 6-17
Part of a restaurant flow model with focus on work artifac...
WORK ENVIRONMENT MODELS
Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 42
Figure 6-18
Physical model for one slideshow presentation
case. Thanks...
WORK ENVIRONMENT MODELS
Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 43
Figure 6-19
A physical model for MUTTS.
BARRIER SUMMARIES
Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 44
# Trigger Goal Barrier
18
Question from remote
audience member
Answer questi...
BARRIER SUMMARIES
Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 45
Description Model % of Talks
Count
(Over all
Talks)
Average
Severity
Average...
MODEL CONSOLIDATION
Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 46
Figure 6-20
Flow model from a group who observed and interviewed the event...
MODEL CONSOLIDATION
Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 47
Figure 6-21
Flow model from a group who mainly observed and interviewed ti...
MODEL CONSOLIDATION
Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 48
Figure 6-22
Flow model from a group who observed and interviewed the offic...
ABRIDGED METHODS FOR DESIGN-INFORMING MODELS EXTRACTION
• Be Selective about the Modeling You Need to Do
• Designer-Abilit...
Exercise 6-3: A Social Model for Your System
• Goal
– Get a little practice in making a social model diagram.
• Activities...
Exercise 6-4: A Social Model for a “Smartphone”
• Sketch out an annotated social model for the use of an iPhone or
similar...
Exercise 6-5: Creating a Flow Model for Your System
• Goal: Get a little practice in creating a flow model for an enterpri...
Next Week Reading List
• Download From YSCEC > User Experience > Books & Papers > Week
06 Reading
– Bardzell, S., Critical...
Homework
Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 54
Readings And
Critiques
Complete
Modeling
Exercises
1 2
Your Blog Post #7
- Summarize ...
GITHUB SETTING
Homework #3
Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 55
Github Set up
• Setup Github Account
• Follow/Watch/Star
– Libraries you are referencing
• Send an email informing your gi...
Online Learnings
• Online Learning on VVVV
– http://everyware.kr/home/category/lectures/vvvv-basics/
– https://github.com/...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Week 05 requirements and models

872

Published on

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
872
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
14
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Transcript of "Week 05 requirements and models"

  1. 1. Lecture 5 Requirements and Models UX Theory / IIT 2014 Spring Class hours : Monday 4 pm – 7 pm 31st March
  2. 2. Homework Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 2 Readings And Critiques Complete Flow Model Sketch for Your System Complete the Online Survey 1 2 3 Your Blog Post #5 - Summarize the papers - Add your critiques for each paper Your Blog Post #6 - A one-page Diagram - 5 Benchmark Cases You may wish to refer Google Doc Survey - Background Information for Team-ups - https://docs.google.com/forms /d/1phvvuDydK- 6QYPxXMmoQ3aR0mEOn2_Xtw9TiXi5 sk3E/viewform
  3. 3. To Do List for Today • Paper Seminar • Flow Model Sketches • Textbook Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 3
  4. 4. To Do List for Today • Seminar – Core Research Ideas : Bring out some keywords or related technological trends, backgrounds, and concerns – Research Questions : What they investigated – Key theories : Some they referred and some they developed by their own – Method : How they proved – Results & Findings : What they learned from the study Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 4
  5. 5. Next Week Reading List • Download From YSCEC > User Experience > Books & Papers > Week 05 Reading – Loeliger, E., & Stockman, T., (2013) Wayfinding without Visual Cues : Evaluation of an Interactive Audio Map System, Interacting with Computers. (Kim, Jungbae) • Textbook – Chapter 5. Extracting Interaction Design Requirements (Park, Joohyun) – Chpater6. Constructing Design-Informing Models (Moon, Jinyoung) Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 5
  6. 6. EXTRACTING INTERACTION DESIGN REQUIREMENTS Textbook Chapter 5. Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 6
  7. 7. INTRODUCTION Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 7 Figure 5-1 You are here; the chapter on extracting interaction requirements, within understanding user work and needs in the context of the overall Wheel lifecycle template.
  8. 8. INTRODUCTION • Gap between Analysis and Design – Information coming from contextual studies describes the work domain but does not directly meet the information needs in design. – There is a cognitive shift between analysis-oriented thinking on one side of the gap and design-oriented thinking on the other. – The gap is the demarcation between the old and the new—between studying existing work practice and existing systems and envisioning a new work space and new system design space. Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 8
  9. 9. INTRODUCTION Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 9 Figure 5-2 Overview of the bridge to design.
  10. 10. NEEDS AND REQUIREMENTS: FIRST SPAN OF THE BRIDGE • What Are “Requirements”? • Requirements “Specifications” – Detailed formal requirements cannot ever be complete. – Detailed formal requirements cannot ever be 100% correct. – Detailed formal requirements cannot be prevented from changing throughout the lifecycle. • Software and Functional Implications of Interaction Design Requirements Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 10
  11. 11. FORMAL REQUIREMENTS EXTRACTION • Walking the WAAD for Needs and Requirements • Switching from Inductive to Deductive Reasoning • Preparation • Systematic Deduction of Needs as “Hinges” to Get at Requirements • Terminology Consistency • Requirement Statements • Requirement Statement Structure • Requirements Document Structure Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 11
  12. 12. FORMAL REQUIREMENTS EXTRACTION Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 12 Name of major feature or category Name of second-level feature or category Requirement statement [WAAD source node ID] Rationale (if useful): Rationale statement Note (optional): Commentary about this requirement Security Privacy of ticket–buyer transactions Shall protect security and privacy of ticket-buyer transactions [C19] Note: In design, consider timeout feature to clear screen between customers. Figure 5-3 Generic structure of a requirement statement. Figure 5-4 Example requirement statement.
  13. 13. FORMAL REQUIREMENTS EXTRACTION • Continue the Process for the Whole WAAD • Keep an Eye out for Emotional Impact Requirements and Other Ways to Enhance the Overall User Experience • Extrapolation Requirements: Generalization of Contextual Data • Other Possible Outputs from the Requirements Extraction Process – Questions about missing data – System support needs – Marketing inputs Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 13
  14. 14. FORMAL REQUIREMENTS EXTRACTION • Constraints as Requirements • Prioritizing Requirements • Taking Requirements Back to Customers and Users for Validation • Resolve Organizational, Sociological, and Personal Issues with the Customer Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 14
  15. 15. ABRIDGED METHODS FOR REQUIREMENTS EXTRACTION • Use the WAAD Directly as a Requirements Representation • Anticipating Needs and Requirements in Contextual Analysis • Use Work Activity Notes as Requirements (Eliminate the WAAD Completely) Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 15
  16. 16. CONSTRUCTING DESIGN-INFORMING MODELS Textbook Chapter 6. Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 16
  17. 17. INTRODUCTION Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 17 Figure 6-1 You are here; the chapter on constructing design informing models, within understanding user work and needs in the context of the overall Wheel lifecycle template.
  18. 18. DESIGN-INFORMING MODELS: SECOND SPAN OF THE BRIDGE • What Are Design-Informing Models and How Are They Used? – help integrate and summarize the contextual data – point back to the data, to maintain the “chain of custody” to ensure that the design is based on real contextual data – provide a shared focus for analysis now and, later, design – provide intermediate deliverables, which can be important to your working relationship with the customer • Envisioned Design-Informing Models Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 18
  19. 19. SOME GENERAL “HOW TO” SUGGESTIONS • Maintain Connections to Your Data • Extract Inputs to Design-Informing Models • Use Your “Bins” of Sorted Work Activity Notes from Contextual Inquiry and Contextual Analysis • Represent Barriers to Work Practice Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 19
  20. 20. USER MODELS • Work Roles – Sub-roles – Mediated work roles – Envisioned work roles – Relationship of work roles to other concepts Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 20 Figure 6-2 Concepts defining and related to work roles.
  21. 21. USER MODELS • User Classes – Knowledge- and skills-based characteristics – Physiological characteristics – Experience-based characteristics • novice or first-time user: may know application domain but not specifics of the application • intermittent user: uses several systems from time to time; knows application domain but not details of different applications • experienced user: “power” user, uses application frequently and knows both application and task domain very well Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 21
  22. 22. USER MODELS Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 22 Figure 6-3 Relationships among work roles, sub-roles, and user class characteristics.
  23. 23. USER MODELS • Social Models – Identify active entities and represent as nodes – Identify concerns and perspectives and represent as attributes of nodes – Identify influences and represent as relationships among entities – Social models in the commercial product perspective – The envisioned social model • User Personas Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 23
  24. 24. USER MODELS Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 24 Figure 6-4 Depiction of entities in the slideshow presentation social model. Thanks to Brad Myers, Carnegie Mellon University, and his colleagues for their case study (Cross, Warmack,& Myers, 1999) on which this example is based.
  25. 25. USER MODELS Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 25 Figure 6-4 Depiction of entities in the slideshow presentation social model. Thanks to Brad Myers, Carnegie Mellon University, and his colleagues for their case study (Cross, Warmack,& Myers, 1999) on which this example is based.
  26. 26. USER MODELS Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 26 Figure 6-6 Depiction of influences in the slideshow presentation social model.
  27. 27. USER MODELS Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 27 Figure 6-7 Example social model for MUTTS.
  28. 28. USAGE MODELS • Flow Model – Creating a flow model diagram – Flow models in the product perspective – The envisioned flow model • Task Models – Tasks vs. functions • Task Structure Models—Hierarchical Task Inventory – Task inventories – Task naming in hierarchical task inventories – Avoid temporal implications in hierarchical task inventories – Envisioned task structure model Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 28
  29. 29. USAGE MODELS Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 29 Figure 6-8 Example flow model from the slideshow presentation contextual inquiry. Thanks to Brad Myers, Carnegie Mellon University, and his colleagues for their case study (Cross, Warmack,& Myers, 1999) on which this is based.
  30. 30. USAGE MODELS Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 30 Figure 6-9 Flow model of our version of MUTTS.
  31. 31. USAGE MODELS Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 31 Figure 6-10 Envisioned flow model for the Ticket Kiosk System.
  32. 32. USAGE MODELS Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 32 Figure 6-11 Hierarchical relationship of task A, the super-task, and tasks B and C, subtasks. Figure 6-12 An incorrect hierarchical relationship attempting to show temporal sequencing.
  33. 33. USAGE MODELS Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 33 Figure 6-13 Sketch of the top levels of a possible hierarchical task inventory diagram for MUTTS.
  34. 34. USAGE MODELS Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 34 Figure 6-14 Partial HTI for MUTTS “sell tickets” task.
  35. 35. USAGE MODELS • Task Interaction Models – Usage scenarios as narrative task interaction models – Elements of scenarios. • Agents (users, people in work roles, often in personas, system, sensors) • User goals and intentions • User background, training, needs, etc. • Reflections on work practice, including user planning, thoughts, feelings, and reactions to system • User actions and user interface artifacts • System responses, feedback • User tasks, task threads, workflows, including common, representative, mission critical, and error and recovery situations • Environmental and work context (e.g., phone ringing) • Barriers, difficulties encountered in usage • And, of course, a narrative, a story that plays out over time Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 35
  36. 36. USAGE MODELS • Task Interaction Models – Envisioned usage scenarios or design scenarios – Step-by-step task interaction models – Essential use case task interaction models – Envisioned task interaction models • Information Object Model – Analyzing scenarios to identify ontology Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 36
  37. 37. USAGE MODELS Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 37 Figure 6-15 Branching and looping structures within step-by step task interaction models.
  38. 38. USAGE MODELS Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 38 Figure 6-16 Task interaction branching and looping for MUTTS.
  39. 39. USAGE MODELS Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 39 User Intention System Responsibility 1. Ticket seller to computer: Express intention to pay 2. Request to insert card 3. Ticket seller or ticket buyer: Insert card 4. Request to remove card quickly 5. Withdraw card 6. Read card information 7. Summarize transaction and cost 8. Request signature (on touch pad) 9. Ticket buyer: Write signature 10. Conclude transaction 11. Issue receipt 12. Take receipt Table 6-1 Example essential use case: Paying for a ticket purchase transaction (with a credit or debit card)
  40. 40. WORK ENVIRONMENT MODELS • Artifact Model – Constructing the artifact model • Physical Model – Envisioned physical model Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 40
  41. 41. WORK ENVIRONMENT MODELS Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 41 Figure 6-17 Part of a restaurant flow model with focus on work artifacts derived from the artifact model.
  42. 42. WORK ENVIRONMENT MODELS Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 42 Figure 6-18 Physical model for one slideshow presentation case. Thanks to Brad Myers, Carnegie Mellon University, and his colleagues for their example (Cross, Warmack, & Myers, 1999) on which this is based.
  43. 43. WORK ENVIRONMENT MODELS Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 43 Figure 6-19 A physical model for MUTTS.
  44. 44. BARRIER SUMMARIES Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 44 # Trigger Goal Barrier 18 Question from remote audience member Answer questions Audio unintelligible. Local members instruct remote members to adjust audio setting. 19 Comment from remote member Respond to comment Audio unintelligible. Local members instruct remote members to reconnect. 20 Comments from local members Respond to comments by referring to slide from earlier in presentation Presenter tries to return to slide. Presenter searches through slides rapidly but cannot find it. 21 Question from local member Answer question Presenter tries again and eventually finds slide. 22 Local member asks presenter to bring up previous slide. Go backward one slide Presenter tries to go back one slide but goes forward one slide instead. 23 Remote audience reconnected Continue discussion 24 Question from remote member Answer question 25 Comment from local member Respond to question Presenter flips through slides searching for “system architecture” slide. Table 6-2 Summary of selected barriers discovered within the step-by-step task interaction models for slideshow presentations
  45. 45. BARRIER SUMMARIES Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 45 Description Model % of Talks Count (Over all Talks) Average Severity Average Duration (Each Time) 1. Changing slides is difficult and awkward because of the placement of the mouse or laptop. Physical 67 166 1.2 2 sec 2. Presenter loses track of time, must ask for verbal update. Sequence 44 6 1.5 55 sec 3. Reference provided is incomplete or skimmed over, audience members would be unable to find it after the talk. Cultural 44 6 1 19 sec 4. Camera view is unclear or pointed at wrong information. Flow 33 3 1.7 60 sec 5. Audio level for demos is not set correctly. Flow 33 3 2 46 sec Table 6-3 Summary of most frequent barriers observed in presentation cases
  46. 46. MODEL CONSOLIDATION Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 46 Figure 6-20 Flow model from a group who observed and interviewed the event manager, event sponsors, the financial manager, and the database administrator.
  47. 47. MODEL CONSOLIDATION Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 47 Figure 6-21 Flow model from a group who mainly observed and interviewed ticket buyers and ticket sellers.
  48. 48. MODEL CONSOLIDATION Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 48 Figure 6-22 Flow model from a group who observed and interviewed the office manager, the advertising manager, and external advertisers.
  49. 49. ABRIDGED METHODS FOR DESIGN-INFORMING MODELS EXTRACTION • Be Selective about the Modeling You Need to Do • Designer-Ability-Driven Modeling • Use a Hybrid of WAAD and Relevant Models • Create Design-Informing Models on the Fly during Interviews Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 49
  50. 50. Exercise 6-3: A Social Model for Your System • Goal – Get a little practice in making a social model diagram. • Activities – Identify active entities, such as work roles, and represent as nodes in the diagram. – Include groups and subgroups of roles and external roles that interact with work roles. – Include system-related roles, such as a central database. – Include workplace ambiance and its pressures and influences. – Identify concerns and perspectives and represent as attributes of nodes. – Identify social relationships, such as influences between entities, and represent these as arcs between nodes in the diagram. – Identify barriers, or potential barriers, in relationships between entities and represent them as red bolts of lightning . • Deliverables – One social model diagram for your • Schedule – This could take a couple of hours. Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 50
  51. 51. Exercise 6-4: A Social Model for a “Smartphone” • Sketch out an annotated social model for the use of an iPhone or similar smartphone by you and your friends. Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 51
  52. 52. Exercise 6-5: Creating a Flow Model for Your System • Goal: Get a little practice in creating a flow model for an enterprise. • Activities: – Follow up on your flow model initial sketch that you did in Exercise 4-1. – Again represent each work role or system entity as a node in the diagram. – Use arcs between nodes to show all communication and coordination necessary to do the work of the enterprise. – Use arcs to represent all information flow and flow of physical artifacts. – Include all forms of communication, including direct conversations, email, phones, • letters, memos, meetings, and so on. – Include both flow internally within the enterprise and flow externally with the rest of the world. • Deliverables – One flow model diagram for your system, with as much detail as feasible. • Schedule – This could take a couple of hours. Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 52
  53. 53. Next Week Reading List • Download From YSCEC > User Experience > Books & Papers > Week 06 Reading – Bardzell, S., Critical Design and Critical Theory : The Challenge of Designing for Provocation, Proceedings of DIS, June 11-15, 2012, Newcastle, UK. • Textbook – Chapter 7. Design Thinking, Ideation, and Sketching Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 53
  54. 54. Homework Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 54 Readings And Critiques Complete Modeling Exercises 1 2 Your Blog Post #7 - Summarize the papers - Add your critiques for each paper Your Blog Post #8 - Social Model - Sketch for a “smartphone” - Draw a flow model diagram for your system Submission Due : 11: 59 pm Sun. 6th April Complete the Online Survey 3 Google Doc Survey on System Concept Statements - TBA on Facebook page - https://www.facebook.com/UX.t heory
  55. 55. GITHUB SETTING Homework #3 Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 55
  56. 56. Github Set up • Setup Github Account • Follow/Watch/Star – Libraries you are referencing • Send an email informing your github address – www.github.com/yourid Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 56
  57. 57. Online Learnings • Online Learning on VVVV – http://everyware.kr/home/category/lectures/vvvv-basics/ – https://github.com/elliotwoods/VVVV.Tutorials.Fundamentals – http://vvvv.org/contribution/dont-panic-the-noobs-guide-to-vvvv – http://vvvv.org/documentation/documentation • Online Learning on Origami & QC – https://vimeo.com/85578380 – https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNE1nfKgKSv6I09WU4FskH5G8ZaB54IN5 • Online Learning on Xcode Storyboards – https://developer.apple.com/xcode/interface-builder/ Lecture #4 IIT_UX Theory 57
  1. A particular slide catching your eye?

    Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

×