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Paths to Net-Zero Energy Sustainable Homes
Paths to Net-Zero Energy Sustainable Homes
Paths to Net-Zero Energy Sustainable Homes
Paths to Net-Zero Energy Sustainable Homes
Paths to Net-Zero Energy Sustainable Homes
Paths to Net-Zero Energy Sustainable Homes
Paths to Net-Zero Energy Sustainable Homes
Paths to Net-Zero Energy Sustainable Homes
Paths to Net-Zero Energy Sustainable Homes
Paths to Net-Zero Energy Sustainable Homes
Paths to Net-Zero Energy Sustainable Homes
Paths to Net-Zero Energy Sustainable Homes
Paths to Net-Zero Energy Sustainable Homes
Paths to Net-Zero Energy Sustainable Homes
Paths to Net-Zero Energy Sustainable Homes
Paths to Net-Zero Energy Sustainable Homes
Paths to Net-Zero Energy Sustainable Homes
Paths to Net-Zero Energy Sustainable Homes
Paths to Net-Zero Energy Sustainable Homes
Paths to Net-Zero Energy Sustainable Homes
Paths to Net-Zero Energy Sustainable Homes
Paths to Net-Zero Energy Sustainable Homes
Paths to Net-Zero Energy Sustainable Homes
Paths to Net-Zero Energy Sustainable Homes
Paths to Net-Zero Energy Sustainable Homes
Paths to Net-Zero Energy Sustainable Homes
Paths to Net-Zero Energy Sustainable Homes
Paths to Net-Zero Energy Sustainable Homes
Paths to Net-Zero Energy Sustainable Homes
Paths to Net-Zero Energy Sustainable Homes
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Paths to Net-Zero Energy Sustainable Homes

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It's cold in Canada, so Canada has always been a world leader in designing efficient homes. This presentation explores the Canadian experience with low-energy housing, and how to get from today's …

It's cold in Canada, so Canada has always been a world leader in designing efficient homes. This presentation explores the Canadian experience with low-energy housing, and how to get from today's standard practice to net-zero

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  • Necessity is the mother of invention. Canada is cold, and Canadian building science has led the world in keeping the heat in. All the world's leading energy efficiency programs from ENERGY STAR to LEED to Passive Haus were founded on Canadian building science: a truth that many Canadians do not even know.   This session will explore the Canadian experience with net-zero energy homes and other low energy buildings, and will focus on emerging lessons that are making net-zero construction viable both here and abroad. The presenter has been actively involved with the Canadian professional and government organizations that have defined all of Canada's leading green building certification programs, including LEED, Built Green, Solar Ready, Net-Zero, and contributions to ENERGY STAR and EnerGuide, and to Ontario's Green Energy Act.   Canada's construction markets have changed significantly over the past few decades, to the point where several of Canada's leading agencies have now adopted a vision of all new buildings using only as much energy as they can produce for themselves by 2030. Even more impressively, many of Canada's leading constructors are making significant strides towards seeing this vision become reality, and are freely sharing their lessons with the industry around them.   This presentation will survey some of the most successful net-zero or near-zero energy projects that have happened recently in Canada, particularly residential and district/community projects, and will focus on: (1) the partnerships behind the projects, (2) the strategies and policies that made the projects possible, (3) how local communities were included, (4) investments models, and (5) transferable lessons that have been impacting the broader market.   Integrated Community Energy Systems are most successful when the buildings within the system are contributors, not only consumers, and when those buildings are marvelously efficient. The information from this presentation will demonstrate that housing and buildings are changing in Canada, that the construction/development industry is ready to join the ICES movement, and that there is opportunity for bold political leadership to enable a net-zero energy built future.   This paper will conclude with recommendations for moving forward: - recommendations to builders/developers on steps they make take immediately, - recommendations to policy makers on tools they could implement to help the industry transition, and - clarifications on the necessary role that zero and low energy buildings play in the transition towards all communities having ICES'.
  • This session will explore the Canadian experience with net-zero energy homes and other low energy buildings, and will focus on emerging lessons that are making net-zero construction viable both here and abroad. The presenter has been actively involved with the Canadian professional and government organizations that have defined all of Canada's leading green building certification programs, including LEED, Built Green, Solar Ready, Net-Zero, and contributions to ENERGY STAR and EnerGuide, and to Ontario's Green Energy Act.   Canada's construction markets have changed significantly over the past few decades, to the point where several of Canada's leading agencies have now adopted a vision of all new buildings using only as much energy as they can produce for themselves by 2030. Even more impressively, many of Canada's leading constructors are making significant strides towards seeing this vision become reality, and are freely sharing their lessons with the industry around them.   This presentation will survey some of the most successful net-zero or near-zero energy projects that have happened recently in Canada, particularly residential and district/community projects, and will focus on: (1) the partnerships behind the projects, (2) the strategies and policies that made the projects possible, (3) how local communities were included, (4) investments models, and (5) transferable lessons that have been impacting the broader market.   Integrated Community Energy Systems are most successful when the buildings within the system are contributors, not only consumers, and when those buildings are marvelously efficient. The information from this presentation will demonstrate that housing and buildings are changing in Canada, that the construction/development industry is ready to join the ICES movement, and that there is opportunity for bold political leadership to enable a net-zero energy built future.   This paper will conclude with recommendations for moving forward: - recommendations to builders/developers on steps they make take immediately, - recommendations to policy makers on tools they could implement to help the industry transition, and - clarifications on the necessary role that zero and low energy buildings play in the transition towards all communities having ICES'.
  • ~67% of residential energy use is for space heating and cooling, 15% for heating water, and 18% for lighting & appliances. In literature, a ‘crisis’ is a decision point – an opportunity for the plot to turn good or bad, and there are always characters that want it to each way. Interesting to note: the total energy supply chain in Canada (and North America) is < 10% efficient. Less than 40% of the energy generated by nuclear/coal/natural gas plants is used to create light / turn motors / run computers. The rest is wasted and lost. Hydro is about 90% efficient, so it is much better overall than the others.
  • Sustainability = “Meeting the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs…” TV show: Design e 2 hosted by Brad Pitt (released June ’06 on PBS) – “A television series that explores the e conomics of being e nvironmentally conscious.” Oprah just recently issued a request “ Are you worried about global warming? Have you and your family made changes around your household to save energy and cut carbon emissions? Do you recycle and set your thermostat to energy saving cycles? Do you use public transportation to help reduce your fuel consumption? Have you found a way to make a difference in your home or in your yard that you could share with our viewers? What are your specific ideas to reduce global warming in your home? Tell us what they are. The Oprah Winfrey Show is looking for families who are making a difference in reducing global warming that can share their stories and creative ideas. Please only respond if you are willing to be on television.”
  • ‘ Greenwashing’ is an emerging term used to describe companies that are making unfounded claims to sustainability – like whitewashing, the idea here is that you can bury a completely unsustainable product with pretty green pictures, a few extra landscaping features, and pretend you’re ‘Green’. When you look at this picture, there’s no way to tell if this building even considered sustainability.
  • Any effective ‘green’ rating system should be able to give due consideration to each of these topical areas of interest, and to their inter-relation. For example, there are many synergistic benefits between a tight building envelope and an efficient HVAC system. Site: landscaping, storm water management, site waste management, lighting… Building orientation and massing Water Envelope HVAC : Ventilation, and heating and cooling strategies Lighting and power Material selection And of course, the everpresent need for Quality Assurance , and Communication between designers Lastly, any system that can assess and compare the merits of green efforts under each of these areas should also afford some opportunity for “Value Engineering”, or for comparing the relative costs and benefits of different options.
  • Each of these systems has a slightly different focus, and associated pros / cons. Eg: EGH, R2000, and E* focus on the benefits of energy efficiency. Blue is E*’s colour, and has become a colour associated with energy efficiency (ie: blue systems are energy efficient systems) R-2000 includes some consideration for things like use of recycled materials and indoor air quality, but not to the same extent as LEED. Green Globes broadens out to include most of the other topics from the previous slide: Project Management (50 pts); Site (115 pts.); Energy (380 pts.); Water (85 pts.); Resources (100 pts.); Emissions (70 pts.); Indoor environment (200 pts.); Total: 1000 pts. Online system, $150, fill in the blank and get your rating (no 3 rd party audit) EnviroHome (CHBA) = R2000 + air quality + “environmental features” (get more info on this!!) Built Green ® starts to capture almost all the same material as LEED ® , and includes independent audits by 3 rd parties for energy (EGNH), but the top rated Built Green home is only slightly more energy efficient than an E-Star home Bronze @ EGNH 72, Silver @ 75, Gold @ 77, Platinum @ 82 LEED ® is quickly emerging as the industry standard, for a couple key reasons we’ll see in the coming slides. Most notably, the minimum standards (prerequisites), the comprehensive scope, and the innovation category. 1. Products made from environmentally attractive materials 1a. Salvaged products 1b. Products with post-consumer recycled content 1c. Products with post-industrial recycled content 1d. Certified wood products 1e. Rapidly renewable products 1f. Products made from agricultural waste material 1g. Minimally processed products 2. Products that are green because of what isn’t there 2a. Products that reduce material use 2b. Alternatives to ozone-depleting substances 2c. Alternatives to products made from PVC and polycarbonate 2d. Alternatives to conventional preservative-treated wood 2e. Alternatives to other components considered hazardous 3. Products that reduce environmental impacts during construction, renovation, or demolition 3a. Products that reduce the impacts of new construction 3b. Products that reduce the impacts of renovation 3c. Products that reduce the impacts of demolition 4. Products that reduce environmental impacts of building operation 4a. Building components that reduce heating and cooling loads 4b. Equipment that conserves energy 4c. Renewable energy and fuel cell equipment 4d. Fixtures and equipment that conserve water 4e. Products with exceptional durability or low maintenance requirements 4f. Products that prevent pollution or reduce waste 4g. Products that reduce or eliminate pesticide treatments 5. Products that contribute to a safe, healthy indoor environment 5a. Products that don’t release significant pollutants into the building 5b. Products that block the introduction, development, or spread of indoor contaminants 5c. Products that remove indoor pollutants 5d. Products that warn occupants of health hazards in the building 5e. Products that improve light quality Refer to Green Labelling Reference Guide under M:\\Greenscape_Consulting\\resources\\specs_&_standards Green Globes, based on BREEAM ( B uilding R esearch E stablishment E nvironmental A ssessment M ethod from British Research Establishment in the UK), is an online building audit for assessing and rating new and existing buildings against best practices, standards and principles of green architecture. It is being used by BOMA Canada as a national environmental recognition and certification program for existing commercial buildings called the BOMA 'Go Green' program. It’s easier to get partial credit under Green Globes (which may be a good or a bad thing depending on your view). Project Management (50 pts); Site (115 pts.); Energy (380 pts.); Water (85 pts.); Resources (100 pts.); Emissions (70 pts.); Indoor environment (200 pts.); Total: 1000 pts. LEED is emerging as the industry standard system or method by which to give due consideration to all environmental concerns, from energy efficiency to IAQ to recycled content & materials selection to construction practices. When last I checked, LEED had been adopted formally in varying degrees by __ governments in the USA, Federal through Municipal, and ___ more in Canada, including our national Department of Defense, the Province of Manitoba (for Provincial buildings), and the Regional Municipality of York. Energy Star is more specialized and less widely used than LEED, but is a useful contributor, easy to use, negligible expense. Common problem is that people don’t follow up to confirm how the building did (ie: Commissioning credits in LEED) Eg: gotta be blue before you can be green!
  • E-Star builds on Energuide, and exploits the much more recognized brand; Typical “code compliant” homes will get EGH ratings in the 60’s – 70’s R2000 demands 80+ (so will the OBC by 2012)‏ Many local builders build to the mid 70’s (Reid’s Heritage Homes is a good example)‏ E-Star homes typically hit 78-80 Worth noting: every point increase in EGH rating translates into roughly 3-5% increase in energy efficiency of the home
  • Photo: 162 Goodwin Dr., Guelph, ON: the first LEED home in Canada (Platinum, via USGBC), built by Reid’s Heritage Homes intro to CaGBG & LEED LEED was created by USGBC, licensed and adapted for use in Canada by the CaGBC Performance-based, self-evaluating, self-documenting, but not self-certifying . LEED structure relatively straightforward: The entire rating system is based on existing codes, standards and guidelines – does not invent any new ones. There are a number of mandatory pre-requisites to “get into the game” and a range of credits for increased performance over the baseline Each credit is structured with the intent stated, followed by the requirements and then with suggested strategies for achieving the credit. The result is that is it relatively straightforward to decide, at early stages of a project, whether a given credit can be cost-effectively achieved. Recognition of various achievement levels is done by awarding Certified, Silver, Gold or Platinum designations There are four rating levels: Bronze, Silver, Gold, and Platinum LEED can fulfill several important roles. Above all, LEED can show clients what a “green” building is, and it can enable private sector and government officials to understand and take “ownership” over specific strategies. They provide a voluntary, consensus-based, market-responsive set of criteria that evaluate project performance from a whole-building, whole-life perspective, providing a common understanding for what constitutes a green building in the Canadian context. This is done by awarding points earned by meeting specific performance criteria, defined in Prerequisites and Credits; that outperform typical standard practice. Improved building performance is certified with ratings – Certified, Silver, Gold or Platinum - based on the total number of points earned by a project. The LEED Checklist is divided into (6) Categories that include: SS – Sustainable Sites WE – Water Efficient EA – Energy & Atmosphere MR – Material & Resources EQ – Indoor Environmental Quality ID – Innovation & Design Process USGBC established in ’98, CaGBC in 2002, and the uptake has increased rapidly every year since.
  • Photo from Adera
  • Invite audience to join the BGC pilot!
  • http://www.passivehouse.ca/passive-house-diversity/ http://www.passivehouse.ca/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/Lodenareal.jpg
  • New HA and LL categories LL adds credits for: community integration (eg: proximity to green space, public transit, and existing city infrastructure [eg: 1 point for infill site])‏ housing density (eg: density >= 20 units/acre gets 3 points)‏ HA adds a prerequisite and a credit for a homeowner manual explaining O&M for the green features.
  • Healthy Comfortable Durable Energy-efficient Environmentally responsible
  • Like anything else, the more you invest, the more you get back. LEED® Silver is very affordable (~5% premium and ~4-5 yr. payback), and even Gold isn’t too expensive (~10% for <10yr. payback) Builders we have contact with are telling us that their costs and sale value increases are approximately: E-star: $4k - $5k avg. increase, (~1.6% on a 250k home). E-star increased sale value: __ LEED ® -H: “certified” (via US) ~10 - 12% more. LEED “gold” home will be ~25 - 30% (via US). We’ll fix that when we bring it to Canada! LEED ® -H increased sale value: __ Capital cost impact affected by: LEED target level Spec flexibility (eg: Green Roof’s are expensive) Building type (ie: how energy efficient was the base design?) Project size (economies of scale): big projects tend to be less expensive on a per unit basis Green market maturity (in mature markets there is more experience and better availability, thus lower costs) Climate zone (eg: extreme clients have high cost projects, so the incremental costs tend to be less pronounced) Team experience Regardless, incremental costs tend to be very reasonable.
  • http://www.calgaryherald.com/technology/Solar+house+lights+future/7525709/story.html
  • http://www.landmarkgroup.ca/net-zero/calgary/the-new-normal/#!/house-as-a-system
  • www.dlsc.ca
  • This presentation will survey some of the most successful net-zero or near-zero energy projects that have happened recently in Canada, particularly residential and district/community projects, and will focus on: (1) the partnerships behind the projects, (2) the strategies and policies that made the projects possible, (3) how local communities were included, (4) investments models, and (5) transferable lessons that have been impacting the broader market.   Integrated Community Energy Systems are most successful when the buildings within the system are contributors, not only consumers, and when those buildings are marvelously efficient. The information from this presentation will demonstrate that housing and buildings are changing in Canada, that the construction/development industry is ready to join the ICES movement, and that there is opportunity for bold political leadership to enable a net-zero energy built future.   This paper will conclude with recommendations for moving forward: - recommendations to builders/developers on steps they make take immediately, - recommendations to policy makers on tools they could implement to help the industry transition, and - clarifications on the necessary role that zero and low energy buildings play in the transition towards all communities having ICES'.
  • Basic energy efficiency measures and conservation before energy generation. Classic Energy Efficiency (EE) measures: Lighting Motor/fan upgrades Efficient appliances Water: aerators on taps, ultra low-flow shower heads, efficient plumbing fixtures
  • - key points for builders This presentation will survey some of the most successful net-zero or near-zero energy projects that have happened recently in Canada, particularly residential and district/community projects, and will focus on: (1) the partnerships behind the projects, (2) the strategies and policies that made the projects possible, (3) how local communities were included, (4) investments models, and (5) transferable lessons that have been impacting the broader market.   Integrated Community Energy Systems are most successful when the buildings within the system are contributors, not only consumers, and when those buildings are marvelously efficient. The information from this presentation will demonstrate that housing and buildings are changing in Canada, that the construction/development industry is ready to join the ICES movement, and that there is opportunity for bold political leadership to enable a net-zero energy built future.   This paper will conclude with recommendations for moving forward: - recommendations to builders/developers on steps they make take immediately, - recommendations to policy makers on tools they could implement to help the industry transition, and - clarifications on the necessary role that zero and low energy buildings play in the transition towards all communities having ICES'.
  • This presentation will survey some of the most successful net-zero or near-zero energy projects that have happened recently in Canada, particularly residential and district/community projects, and will focus on: (1) the partnerships behind the projects, (2) the strategies and policies that made the projects possible, (3) how local communities were included, (4) investments models, and (5) transferable lessons that have been impacting the broader market.   Integrated Community Energy Systems are most successful when the buildings within the system are contributors, not only consumers, and when those buildings are marvelously efficient. The information from this presentation will demonstrate that housing and buildings are changing in Canada, that the construction/development industry is ready to join the ICES movement, and that there is opportunity for bold political leadership to enable a net-zero energy built future.   This paper will conclude with recommendations for moving forward: - recommendations to builders/developers on steps they make take immediately, - recommendations to policy makers on tools they could implement to help the industry transition, and - clarifications on the necessary role that zero and low energy buildings play in the transition towards all communities having ICES'.
  • Image from http://www.caribbeanelections.com/education/images/library_books_5516.jpg Prefer personal power instead of community owned (eg: coop)? Contact Mindscape. Keep brief: <1 min. Mindscape Innovations, the 2008 Gowlings "New Business of the Year", which provides core enabling services to both the green building sector and the renewable energy sector: from feasibility studies to renewable energy system solutions to processing grants and incentives to certifying ENERGY STAR or LEED buildings.
  • Transcript

    • 1. © Mindscape Innovations Group Inc.Derek Satnik, P.Eng., LEED®APMindscape Innovations Groupwww.mi-group.caPaths to Zero: The CanadianExperience with Low-Energy BuildingsQUEST, Winnipeg 2012-11-21
    • 2. © Mindscape Innovations Group Inc.Presentation Agenda• Intro. & Context (Buildings in ICES)• Technical Tools: Rating Systems (ENERGY STAR®,BUILT GREEN®, LEED®, etc.)• Case Studies• Policy Tools• Key Points for Builders / Developers and Designers• Key Points for Policy Makers• Q&A
    • 3. © Mindscape Innovations Group Inc.The Emerging Energy Crisis &The Green (Sustainable) Movement• The impact of Canadian buildings:– >6x avg. global energy use per capita– >2x more than Europe’s energy/GDP (ie: not competitive)– Consume ~40% of our energy (electricity & natural gas)– Consume >5.5 billion m3/ year of water– Consume the majority of processed material resources– Generate ~40% of all GHG emissions in Canada• Public acceptance that this can’t continue…Brampton suburb Toronto downtown
    • 4. © Mindscape Innovations Group Inc.The Business Case:• Enhanced Bldg. Re-sale Value• Healthier Occupants• Happier Occupants• “Future Proofing”(eg: ongoing code changes)• Reduced O&M Costs• Enhanced Corporate Image forBuilder• Builder’s Social Responsibility• Reduced Liability(for rental properties)Why Build ‘Green’ (Sustainable)?“The earth is not inherited from ourfathers, but borrowed from ourchildren…” (First Nations proverb)
    • 5. How to Make ‘Green’ (Sustainable) Designshttp://www.sandiegocommercialfunding.com/ © Mindscape Innovations Group Inc.Communication& Quality ControlWaterLighting& PowerHVACBuildingEnvelopeMaterialsSelectionsOrientation,Configuration,Massing(landscaping,SWM, …)SiteEffluents& Waste
    • 6. Technical Tools: Building Rating Systems• EnerGuide Rating System• R-2000 (update coming)• ENERGY STAR®• Green Globes(BREEAM, & BOMA’s “GoGreen”)• EnviroHome (CHBA)• Built Green®• LEED®• Solar Ready• NZE(r)? (coming)© Mindscape Innovations Group Inc.
    • 7. Residential Green Building Rating SystemsEnvironmental PerformanceEnergyPerformanceBuilding CodeBottom25% &codeviolatorsMain-stream50%LEEDing25%BronzeSilverGoldPlatinumCertifiedSilverGoldPlatinum© Mindscape Innovations Group Inc.
    • 8. ICI Green Building Rating SystemsEnvironmental PerformanceEnergyPerformanceBuilding CodeBottom25% &codeviolatorsMain-stream50%LEEDing25%CertifiedSilverGoldPlatinum© Mindscape Innovations Group Inc.Energy benchmarking:mNECB / ASHRAELEED NC,CI, CS,EB:O&MLivingBuildingChallenge
    • 9. © Mindscape Innovations Group Inc.ENERGY STAR®Homes(“gotta be blue before you can be green”)• ENERGY STAR qualification is a pre-requisite forLEED®for Homes• Key features focus on energy efficiency:– Better insulation (attic, basement floor, walls, includingunderground basement walls)– Tighter envelope (more effort into sealing)– Better windows and doors (low-e, argon filled)– Heat & energy recovery ventilators (HRV & ERVs)– Efficient fans in washrooms (ENERGY STAR rated) andefficient lighting and appliances• EPA & REB reports show increased value (sale &resale): $1 in annual energy savings ≈ $20 inc. value
    • 10. © Mindscape Innovations Group Inc.• LEED = Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design• CaGBC = Canada Green Building Council, founded 2002• Points based system used to guide design & measureperformance• Customized for several markets (eg: NC, EBOM, CI, CS,Homes, ND, …)• Most widely accepted system in North America: Adoptedby >100 governments and agencies: municipal throughfederal• Buildings are certified by CaGBC (ie: independent 3rdparty) to demonstrate compliance:• Municipal Toolkit for policy makersCaGBC & LEED®
    • 11. © Mindscape Innovations Group Inc.BUILT GREEN ®Canada• Made by builders, for builders: practical, and rigorous• Pre-requires EnerGuide labelling• Points based system used to guide design & measureperformance• Custom programs for homes, reno’s, “high density”, andnow working on community level pilot program• Strongly supported in western Canada, originated in SWUS, expanded across Canada in 2010• Buildings are certified by Built Green Canada (ie:independent 3rdparty) to demonstrate compliance• Certifications start at ~5% improvement over Code, andaugment to levels competitive with LEED• Focus on being practical and buildable
    • 12. © Mindscape Innovations Group Inc.BUILT GREEN ®Canada• Made by builders, for builders: practical, and rigorous• Pre-requires EnerGuide labelling• Points based system used to guide design & measureperformance• Custom programs for homes, reno’s, “high density”, andnow working on community level pilot program• Strongly supported in western Canada, originated in SWUS, expanded across Canada in 2010• Buildings are certified by Built Green Canada (ie:independent 3rdparty) to demonstrate compliance• Certifications start at ~5% improvement over Code, andaugment to levels competitive with LEED• Focus on being practical and buildableJoint the Pilot! Help create the“BUILT GREEN® Communities” programand set the new standard!Consider enrolling a pilot project(pledges required at $100/acre)Contact Built Green Canada attsc-chair@builtgreencanada.cabefore Nov. 30 to express your interest.
    • 13. © Mindscape Innovations Group Inc.Net-Zero (Ready)• Design the home to need very little energy (min. 50%better than code), and have an upgrade packageavailable for on-site generation (eg: PV) to provide allthe energy needed.for heat and electricity• “Net-zero” does not necessarily need to be all on site:condo environments create opportunity for sharedgeneration assets (eg: turbine in the park that powerseveryone together)• All starts with aggressive energy conservation
    • 14. © Mindscape Innovations Group Inc.How 3rdParty Residential Programs Work• Builders perform construction• 2ndParty verifiers: local certified energy professional• 3rdParty (Provider) audits verification• Governing body owns and manages program andmonitors quality of delivery processCaGBCNRCanBGCetc.BuildersQA / AuditingProviderstrainingcertificationdesign supportRaterssite testingdesignsupport
    • 15. © Mindscape Innovations Group Inc.How 3rdParty Residential Programs Work• Builders perform construction• 2ndParty verifiers: local certified energy professional• 3rdParty (Provider) audits verification• Governing body owns and manages program andmonitors quality of delivery processCaGBCNRCanBGCetc.BuildersQA / AuditingProviderstrainingcertificationdesign supportRaterssite testingdesignsupport
    • 16. © Mindscape Innovations Group Inc.How 3rdParty Commercial Programs Work• Builders perform construction• 2ndParty verifiers: local certified energy professional• 3rdParty (Provider) audits verification• Governing body owns and manages program andmonitors quality of delivery processCaGBCNRCanBGCetc.BuildersQA / AuditingProviderstrainingcertificationdesign supportRaterssite testingdesignsupport
    • 17. © Mindscape Innovations Group Inc.Case Study: Stickwood Walker FarmRodeo Fine Homes, Newmarket, ON• 50% energysavings• Solar thermal(air & water)• Cistern• Permeablepavers• Community of 34homes, all LEEDPlatinum• ~$70k sale premium
    • 18. © Mindscape Innovations Group Inc.Case Study: Ontario Green HomeWilliamsburg Homes, Kitchener, ON• 50% energysavings:R50 attic,R32 walls,R20 bsmt,R10 slab• AdvancedHVAC• 50% watersavings• Local Ontariomaterials• ENERGY STAR, SolarReady, LEEDPlatinum, BUILTGREEN Platinum• $30k sale premium
    • 19. © Mindscape Innovations Group Inc.Case Study: Discovery Home 5Avalon Master Builder, Calgary, AB• Net-zeroenergy• Solar water• Living wall
    • 20. © Mindscape Innovations Group Inc.Case Study: Landmark HomesNexus 2 Model, Edmonton, AB• Standardmodel• 80-90% moreefficient• Integrated PVroof: net-zeroenergy• >900 homes BUILTGREEN®certified• Avg builds score 78-86 on EnerGuide
    • 21. © Mindscape Innovations Group Inc.Case Study: Drake Landing Solar Community,Okotoks, AB• District energy: solar/geo heating• Efficient homes• Government $$ support
    • 22. © Mindscape Innovations Group Inc.Case Study:Toronto Renewable Energy Coop• Community owned turbine• Powers 200 homes• Integrated with parkland• Tourist attraction
    • 23. CaseStudy:DocksideGreen,Vancouver,BC© Mindscape Innovations Group Inc.• Closed-loopdesign• LEED® Platinumeverything• Sewer-gastransit• Profitable
    • 24. © Mindscape Innovations Group Inc.Case Study:EnWave District Energy System, Toronto, ON• Instead of gas, enwavedelivers heat through highlyefficient, short-distancetechnology, to Toronto’sdowntown.
    • 25. Photo from http://www.socalofficerealestateblog.com/wp-content/newuploads/2009/06/saddleback-church-solar-electric-panels-1-large.jpgPolicy Tools:Incentives That Make $enseUtility based:• Design assistance grants (conservation)• Energy audit & retrofit rebates• Net-metering / Feed-In Tariff (FIT)Municipality based:• Expedited approvals• Density bonuses• Partial/temporary property tax waivers• DC credits / cash rebates• Green Municipal Mortgages (LIC based)Other: Capital Cost Allowances (tax based)© Mindscape Innovations Group Inc.
    • 26. © Mindscape InnovationsConservation Roadmap & ROI ChartFrom book Smart Power: An Urban Guide to Renewable Energy and Efficiency, © William H. KempWARNING: C.E.P. Peril:•Too much vision, too little reality
    • 27. Walmart, McKinney, Texas, with white roof, wind & solar:http://www.elperfecto.com/wp-content/uploads/Bing_Maps_Wind_Turbine_Wal-Mart_McKinneyTX.jpg© Mindscape Innovations Group Inc.Recommendations forConstructors & Designers• Codes are changing: EnerGuide 80 for homes, 15-20% energy improvements for ICI• 3rdparty testing of homes is increasing: ENERGYSTAR, LEED, BUILT GREEN, resale audits, …• Many agencies are moving towards net-zero code by2030: builders need to stay ahead, and can use toolslike LEED etc. to sell their value• Leverage resources like www.ontariogreenspec.ca,and www.mibop.ca
    • 28. © Mindscape Innovations Group Inc.Recommendations for Policy Makers• Don’t pretend you can magically mandateimprovements: culture change isn’t won with a pen• Appropriate policy changes are empowering• Network with other municipalities (eg: via QUESTMunicipal caucus’) to share experiences/resources• Implement Green Municipal Mortgages ASAP• Lead by example with municipal buildings• Consider offering targeted incentives to increaseconstructor interestPhoto from http://www.americanprogress.org/issues/2009/04/img/solar_church_onpage.jpg
    • 29. © Mindscape Innovations Group Inc.Mindscape Innovations Group• In this new library of ideas, we’re the librarians.• Turn-key full lifecycle solutions forenvironmentally and technologically enhancedhomes, businesses, and communities.• 14 awards since ‘07, municipal through international• Core enabling services to both the green buildingsector and the renewable energy sector: policy andincentive program development, Community EnergyPlans / Sustainability Plans, feasibility studies,renewable energy system solutions, processinggrants and incentives, permits and approvals,managing public stakeholdering and much more...
    • 30. © Mindscape Innovations Group Inc.info@mi-group.ca877-394-6589www.mi-group.caThank you.

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