Diaz and Strickland Source: Adapted from Judy Baker, PhD, San Diego Miramar College
In the good old days…
In the networked/information age…
<ul><li>CHANGED </li></ul><ul><li>NOT CHANGED </li></ul><ul><li>Ease of cheating </li></ul><ul><li>Ease of monitoring chea...
Poll
<ul><li>http://www.cheathouse.com/ </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.schoolsucks.com/ </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.researchpape...
<ul><li>Physical separation </li></ul><ul><li>Creation of psycho-social  “distance” resulting in less influence by social ...
<ul><li>Hacking </li></ul><ul><li>Changing properties in word and other documents  </li></ul><ul><li>Changing the clock on...
<ul><li>Test cheating is typically 1/3 to 1/2 lower on campuses that have honor codes </li></ul><ul><li>The level of serio...
<ul><li>Electronic record of all correspondence in online courses  </li></ul><ul><li>Entire courses are archived for futur...
<ul><li>Assign work and tests that are due frequently throughout the semester  </li></ul><ul><li>Assign work that builds s...
<ul><li>Require assignment and test responses to relate the subject matter to students' lived experiences or test question...
<ul><li>Debrief/interview a student concerning their test/quiz asking specific questions about their answers </li></ul><ul...
<ul><li>Randomly generate test questions from question database  </li></ul><ul><li>Set quizzes to have only one question p...
 
<ul><li>Poll </li></ul>
<ul><li>Assign narrow and specific research topics.  </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t allow last-minute changes of topic.  </li></u...
<ul><li>Define academic integrity as a class.  </li></ul><ul><li>Encourage students to come to you if they are confused ab...
<ul><li>Affirm the importance of academic integrity—workplace standards. </li></ul><ul><li>Encourage student responsibilit...
<ul><li>Center for Academic Integrity </li></ul><ul><li>Assessment and Evaluation for Online Courses  </li></ul><ul><li>Al...
<ul><li>Identify one academic integrity challenge you’ve experienced </li></ul><ul><li>Turn to your neighbor and identify ...
 
<ul><li>Copyright law applies to creative and expressive works and includes </li></ul><ul><ul><li>performances, scripts, i...
<ul><li>A “fair use” is copying any protected material (texts, sounds, images, etc.) for a limited and “transformative” pu...
<ul><li>Fair use overview:  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>http://fairuse.stanford.edu/Copyright_and_Fair_Use_Overview/chapter9/9-b...
<ul><li>Must be the creator of all of the materials or  </li></ul><ul><li>Must have the express permission of the creator ...
<ul><li>Find Creative Commons work:  http://search.creativecommons.org/   </li></ul><ul><li>Yahoo! : ( http://search.yahoo...
<ul><li>You DO NOT need to secure the separate permission of the provider of a work in 5 main instances:  </li></ul><ul><u...
<ul><li>Identify some content that you might use in your course that is copyright-safe </li></ul><ul><li>Share what you fi...
 
Veronica Diaz, PhD
<ul><li>A podcast is a multimedia file distributed over the Internet using RSS feeds, for playback on mobile devices and p...
<ul><li>RSS in Plain English  </li></ul><ul><li>Podcast audio uses a syndication feed that passes the address of a media f...
<ul><li>Course content dissemination </li></ul><ul><li>Classroom recording </li></ul><ul><li>Field recording  </li></ul><u...
<ul><li>Course Content Dissemination </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Interviews  </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Music samples  </li></ul...
<ul><li>Create a learning environment that extends well outside the boundaries of the classroom </li></ul><ul><li>Review C...
<ul><li>Recording tools  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Macs  </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Garage Band (apple)  </li></ul></ul></...
<ul><li>Before you start recording, think about what you want to say, and organize your podcast accordingly </li></ul><ul>...
<ul><li>Copyright law is relevant to podcasts because it applies to creative and expressive works and copyright attaches a...
<ul><li>Get an iPod or other MP3 player or  </li></ul><ul><li>Check one out from MCLI for a semester  </li></ul><ul><li>Do...
<ul><li>http://drcoop.pbwiki.com/iTunesU   </li></ul>
<ul><li>Alisa Cooper </li></ul><ul><ul><li>http://drcoop.pbwiki.com/   </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>http://drcoop.pbwiki.com...
<ul><li>Beginner’s guide to podcasting  </li></ul><ul><li>Create your own podcast  (Rick Broida) </li></ul><ul><li>Creatin...
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Blended by Design: Academic Integrity, Copyright and Podcasting

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  • Blended by Design: Academic Integrity, Copyright and Podcasting

    1. 1. Diaz and Strickland Source: Adapted from Judy Baker, PhD, San Diego Miramar College
    2. 2. In the good old days…
    3. 3. In the networked/information age…
    4. 4. <ul><li>CHANGED </li></ul><ul><li>NOT CHANGED </li></ul><ul><li>Ease of cheating </li></ul><ul><li>Ease of monitoring cheating </li></ul><ul><li>Ease of preventing cheating </li></ul><ul><li>Definitions </li></ul><ul><li>Honor code policies and procedures </li></ul><ul><li>Student assessment quality, validity, reliability </li></ul>
    5. 5. Poll
    6. 6. <ul><li>http://www.cheathouse.com/ </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.schoolsucks.com/ </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.researchpaper.com/ </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.allpapers.com/intro.htm </li></ul>
    7. 7. <ul><li>Physical separation </li></ul><ul><li>Creation of psycho-social “distance” resulting in less influence by social norms and more influence by peers </li></ul><ul><li>Excuses and alibis </li></ul><ul><li>Accidentally sending/depositing a file in someone else’s dropbox </li></ul><ul><li>Faking technical difficulties during online tests </li></ul><ul><li>Sharing computers </li></ul><ul><li>Leaving work on the desktop, available to many others </li></ul>
    8. 8. <ul><li>Hacking </li></ul><ul><li>Changing properties in word and other documents </li></ul><ul><li>Changing the clock on your computer to send email or post files late, but showing an earlier date and time </li></ul>
    9. 9. <ul><li>Test cheating is typically 1/3 to 1/2 lower on campuses that have honor codes </li></ul><ul><li>The level of serious cheating on written assignments is 1/4 to 1/3 lower </li></ul><ul><li>Typically less than 10% admit to such chronic test cheating </li></ul>
    10. 10. <ul><li>Electronic record of all correspondence in online courses </li></ul><ul><li>Entire courses are archived for future reference and for quality control purposes </li></ul><ul><li>Instructor has a readily accessible record of everything done by each student </li></ul><ul><li>Easy to compare a student’s writing style on different class assignments </li></ul>
    11. 11. <ul><li>Assign work and tests that are due frequently throughout the semester </li></ul><ul><li>Assign work that builds sequentially on prior submitted work, such as revisions of drafts </li></ul><ul><li>Call on students randomly during the semester to administer unannounced oral exams </li></ul><ul><li>Take-home tests/quizzes </li></ul>
    12. 12. <ul><li>Require assignment and test responses to relate the subject matter to students' lived experiences or test questions on current events </li></ul><ul><li>Meet with students individually online and test/quiz them on course content </li></ul><ul><li>Require students to participate in discussion groups </li></ul><ul><li>Keep a log and review writing styles of students </li></ul>
    13. 13. <ul><li>Debrief/interview a student concerning their test/quiz asking specific questions about their answers </li></ul><ul><li>Use alternative modes of student assessment such as portfolios, rubrics, self-assessment, peer assessment, and contracts </li></ul><ul><li>Use multiple methods of measuring performance, mastery, and skill </li></ul><ul><li>Use application-type exams (PBL, case based learning) </li></ul>
    14. 14. <ul><li>Randomly generate test questions from question database </li></ul><ul><li>Set quizzes to have only one question per screen to make printing of quizzes more difficult </li></ul><ul><li>Set quizzes to not allow return to previous questions </li></ul><ul><li>Limit accessibility to tests to specific time periods </li></ul><ul><li>Use timed online testing </li></ul><ul><li>Limit online access to lab computers with a proctor </li></ul>
    15. 16. <ul><li>Poll </li></ul>
    16. 17. <ul><li>Assign narrow and specific research topics. </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t allow last-minute changes of topic. </li></ul><ul><li>Require that outlines be submitted 3-4 weeks prior to the deadline and that drafts be submitted with the final paper. </li></ul><ul><li>Give written or oral pop quizzes in class. </li></ul><ul><li>Require detailed citations, including page numbers. </li></ul><ul><li>Put your school’s academic integrity policy in your syllabus. </li></ul>
    17. 18. <ul><li>Define academic integrity as a class. </li></ul><ul><li>Encourage students to come to you if they are confused about citation practices. </li></ul><ul><li>Be a good role model. Cite sources in your lectures. </li></ul><ul><li>Talk about academic honesty with your students, and make sure they understand both the reasons and the tools for avoiding plagiarism--contracts. </li></ul>
    18. 19. <ul><li>Affirm the importance of academic integrity—workplace standards. </li></ul><ul><li>Encourage student responsibility for academic integrity. </li></ul><ul><li>Clarify expectations for students. </li></ul><ul><li>Develop diverse forms of assessment. </li></ul><ul><li>Reduce opportunities to engage in academic dishonesty. </li></ul><ul><li>Challenge academic dishonesty when it occurs and make it public. </li></ul><ul><li>Help define and support campus-wide academic integrity standards. </li></ul>
    19. 20. <ul><li>Center for Academic Integrity </li></ul><ul><li>Assessment and Evaluation for Online Courses </li></ul><ul><li>Alternative Assessments </li></ul><ul><li>Empowering Students through Negotiable Contracting to Draft Rubrics for Authentic Assessment (.doc) </li></ul><ul><li>Alternative Assessment and Technology (ERIC Digest) </li></ul><ul><li>Classroom Assessment Techniques </li></ul>
    20. 21. <ul><li>Identify one academic integrity challenge you’ve experienced </li></ul><ul><li>Turn to your neighbor and identify a solution for each of your challenges </li></ul>
    21. 23. <ul><li>Copyright law applies to creative and expressive works and includes </li></ul><ul><ul><li>performances, scripts, interviews, musical works and sound recordings </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Under current US copyright law, copyright attaches automatically to creative, expressive works once they have been “fixed,” i.e. written down or recorded </li></ul>
    22. 24. <ul><li>A “fair use” is copying any protected material (texts, sounds, images, etc.) for a limited and “transformative” purpose, like criticizing, commenting, parodying, news reporting, teaching the copyrighted work. </li></ul><ul><li>4 factors considered in fair use cases: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>purpose and character of your use; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>nature of the copyrighted work; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>amount and substantiality of the portion taken; and </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>effect of the use upon the potential market. </li></ul></ul>
    23. 25. <ul><li>Fair use overview: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>http://fairuse.stanford.edu/Copyright_and_Fair_Use_Overview/chapter9/9-b.html </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Creative Commons : </li></ul><ul><ul><li>http://creativecommons.org/ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>http://search.creativecommons.org/ </li></ul></ul>
    24. 26. <ul><li>Must be the creator of all of the materials or </li></ul><ul><li>Must have the express permission of the creator or copyright owner of materials included to license their materials under a Creative Commons license </li></ul><ul><li>Creative Commons License Options: http://creativecommons.org/about/licenses/meet-the-licenses </li></ul>
    25. 27. <ul><li>Find Creative Commons work: http://search.creativecommons.org/ </li></ul><ul><li>Yahoo! : ( http://search.yahoo.com/search/options ) clearly illustrates how you can limit your search results to Creative Commons-licensed works. </li></ul><ul><li>Google : ( http://www.google.com/advanced_search ) by limiting your search according to “Usage Rights”, this will restrict your searching to find CC-licensed materials only. </li></ul>
    26. 28. <ul><li>You DO NOT need to secure the separate permission of the provider of a work in 5 main instances: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>When the material is not protected by copyright; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>When the text was protected by copyright but is in the public domain; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>When you are using US Government works; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>When you are making a “fair use” of the work; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>When you wish to make more than a “fair use” of the work and the work is under a Creative Commons license that authorizes your intended use </li></ul></ul>
    27. 29. <ul><li>Identify some content that you might use in your course that is copyright-safe </li></ul><ul><li>Share what you find with your neighbor </li></ul>
    28. 31. Veronica Diaz, PhD
    29. 32. <ul><li>A podcast is a multimedia file distributed over the Internet using RSS feeds, for playback on mobile devices and personal computers </li></ul><ul><li>The term “Podcasting” is a synonym for audioblogging </li></ul><ul><li>What makes a podcast different from other digital audio formats is its ability to be downloaded automatically using software capable of reading feeds like Google Reader </li></ul>
    30. 33. <ul><li>RSS in Plain English </li></ul><ul><li>Podcast audio uses a syndication feed that passes the address of a media file to the RSS aggregator </li></ul><ul><li>RSS 2.0 stands for Really Simple Syndication and is a type of web feed, a data format used for serving users' frequently updated content </li></ul><ul><li>Websites syndicate the web feed, which allows users to subscribe to it, like a newspaper subscription </li></ul><ul><li>Other Common Craft Resources </li></ul>
    31. 34. <ul><li>Course content dissemination </li></ul><ul><li>Classroom recording </li></ul><ul><li>Field recording </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Audio journaling, interviews, observations, learning experience </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Audio research (in field/discipline) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Study support </li></ul><ul><ul><li>via repeated listening to audio content </li></ul></ul>
    32. 35. <ul><li>Course Content Dissemination </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Interviews </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Music samples </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Foreign language passages </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Time Shifting </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Expanding the classroom, time on task </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Review capability </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>iPod technology offers the potential to shift the proportion of class time devoted to learning that benefits from face-to-face interactions between faculty and students, and shift preparatory work to outside times and locations. (Leland quoted in Blaisdell, 2006) </li></ul></ul>
    33. 36. <ul><li>Create a learning environment that extends well outside the boundaries of the classroom </li></ul><ul><li>Review Capability </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Course lectures can be dense and difficult to process in just one sitting </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Podcasts allow for review, review, and more review </li></ul></ul>
    34. 37. <ul><li>Recording tools </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Macs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Garage Band (apple) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.apple.com/ilife/garageband/ </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Macs and PCs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Odeo: http://odeo.com/ </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Audacity </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>http://audacity.sourceforge.net/ </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Audacity ABCs.pdf </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>
    35. 38. <ul><li>Before you start recording, think about what you want to say, and organize your podcast accordingly </li></ul><ul><li>Make notes, prepare your interviews (if any), improvise as little as possible </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Kirk McElhearn’s 8 Rules of Effective Podcasting </li></ul></ul>
    36. 39. <ul><li>Copyright law is relevant to podcasts because it applies to creative and expressive works and copyright attaches automatically </li></ul><ul><li>Rights and permissions need to be secured for material included </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.podcastingnews.com/topics/Podcast-Legal_Music.html </li></ul><ul><li>Look for free content </li></ul>
    37. 40. <ul><li>Get an iPod or other MP3 player or </li></ul><ul><li>Check one out from MCLI for a semester </li></ul><ul><li>Download iTunes (free) </li></ul><ul><li>Search the podcast library </li></ul><ul><li>Assign one or two to your students </li></ul><ul><ul><li>See how it works and see if they like it </li></ul></ul>
    38. 41. <ul><li>http://drcoop.pbwiki.com/iTunesU </li></ul>
    39. 42. <ul><li>Alisa Cooper </li></ul><ul><ul><li>http://drcoop.pbwiki.com/ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>http://drcoop.pbwiki.com/PodcastingLegalIssues </li></ul></ul><ul><li>iTunes (free download) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.apple.com/itunes/download/ </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Educause </li></ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.educause.edu/ > resources > podcasting (keyword) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>iTunes U </li></ul><ul><ul><li>iTunes U at Stanford University </li></ul></ul>
    40. 43. <ul><li>Beginner’s guide to podcasting </li></ul><ul><li>Create your own podcast (Rick Broida) </li></ul><ul><li>Creating a podcast with GarageBand </li></ul><ul><li>All the world’s a podcast (Michael Calore) </li></ul><ul><li>Academic Podcasts </li></ul><ul><li>University of Wisconsin examples </li></ul>

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