Journaling in the
Music Classroom
Travis Williamson
EDIM 510 Web 2.0
What is Journaling?
• Listening Journals
• Reflection Journals
• Read and Write Journals
Types of Journals
An opportunity ...
Standards and Journals
• Journals can match content-area standards
• Journals can integrate language arts standards
• Adop...
How to Journal
Journal begins with prompting.
• Prompt with Question
• Prompt with Recorded Music and Question
• Prompt wi...
Assessment and Journals
• Can be based on Grammar.
• Can be based on Quantity.
• Can be based on topic knowledge.
• Can be...
Classroom Management
• Used for opening or closing activities.
• Can provide clear structure and expectation.
• Individual...
Journaling Tech
• Classroom Stereo allows listening prompts.
• PowerPoint Prompts allow images and video.
• Blogging Promp...
Journal Samples…
What feelings are expressed in this
piece, and how do you know?
Journal Samples…
What genre does this piece fit,
and why?
Journal Samples…
What mental image(s)
does this recording give you?
Journal Samples…
What inspired the people of the
“Age of Enlightenment?”
Activity
At your seat, create a prompt to match a recording or
music-related video you could use in your classroom.
Is thi...
Resources
Entry with Pen Image: https://flic.kr/p/8fQsXR
Closed Journal Image: https://flic.kr/p/93MJC3
Reel-to-Reel Image...
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Journaling In The Music Room

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Journaling in the Music Classroom is a great way to engage and connect with your students, maintain a positive and structured classroom environment, and meet school-wide educational objectives such as Adopt-an-Anchor and Reading Across the Curriculum. View today and join the movement!

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  • Welcome to today’s session, Journaling in the Music Classroom. Today I would like to discuss ways that you could utilize Journaling in your Music Room.
  • First, we must discuss Journaling as a strategy. Although it may have many different appearances, Journaling is simply a way to provide students an opportunity for written response. In the music room, Listening Journals may invite students to comment on what they hear in a recording or how a recording relates to their experiences. A Reflection Journal may ask students to describe their feelings, experiences or ideas. A Read and Write Journal may ask students to write based on an Article or Summary they may have read in class.
  • In our increasingly data-driven world, it is important to note that Journaling provides a great way for Music Educators to connect students to content-area standards through writing, while also providing an opportunity to integrate language arts standards in the music room as well. Additionally, Journaling provides a clear strategy for Adopting-An-Anchor in music, a technique of integrating standardized-tested standards within courses not yet being standardized tested.
  • To take the plunge in Journaling in your classroom, you simply need to pick a prompt for your students. Music teachers can prompt students with a question, or combine that question with recorded music, reading materials, or even a video clip – perhaps a musical performance found on YouTube! By combining media with the prompt, teachers have the ability to make Journaling “fun,” all while meeting content and language standards.
  • A common fear is the need to assess daily journals. While the Journals can be graded on grammatical accuracy, they can also be based on quantity of writing or display of topic knowledge. Journals can also be shared (and assessed) through a daily class discussion following their “writing time.” Just keep in mind that you will want to avoid the assessment “stifling” the quality or quantity of the student’s efforts. The reflective and expressive nature of Journaling can make it another opportunity for students to be excited about learning music in your classroom.
  • In addition to another form of assessment in your classroom, Journaling can also aid in classroom management. It can easily be used for an opening or closing activity, and the daily process can provide clear structure and expectation for the beginning or ending of your time together. Additional, the individual nature of writing allows the teacher the freedom to coach individuals, pass back papers, or even conference with individual students as the class journals.
  • Depending on your access and comfort level with technology in the classroom, you may soon add technology tools to the Journaling process. A classroom stereo can allow the playing of recordings for listening prompts, and the use of a projector and PowerPoint can allow for images and video clips for reflection. If you have access to individual machines, blogging allows prompts to be collaborative – providing the ability for peer reading and commenting. Additionally, there are countless other options utilizing Computers, Tablets or Mobile technology in the classroom, depending on your school and facility resources and policies.
  • Let’s take a look at a few examples of Journals for the music classroom. “What feelings are expressed in this piece, and how do you know?” This is a reflective listening question that encourages opinion with support. On occasion, I have even had a student come up to me and ask me to place his song in class. After a few days to check the lyrics and appropriateness of his recording, I would sometimes use this question to share a student’s piece with the class during our journal.
  • Here’s another example. “What genre does this piece fit, and why?” Here you are asking students to define characteristics one or more styles of music as they relate to a recording, but in a simple and engaging way. Could you see how students would to discuss their answers after they write? For this question, I might use a lesser known artist, or a “B-side” from an artist they know – this question is fun for the students, but is truly a form of Classification on Bloom’s Taxonomy!
  • Here is another listening journal that is reflective in nature. “What mental image(s) does this recording give you?” I ask my students to copy the question and write 5 sentences in response, so the use of descriptive writing is a must for this question. This is such an individual question, and students may relate to their experiences or personal stories for this question as well. This is fun to share, and this type of Journal question followed by discussion can not only bring journaling into your classroom, but connect your students through their sharing sessions with the class.
  • This last example is a Read and Write question I developed to reinforce reading across the curriculum in our classroom. After the students read about the Classical Era of music in a Music Alive magazine, this was one of three short questions on the board. Still expecting a 5-sentence response, my students had to develop their responses a little more than a typical “find the answer” question, and then the discussion after the journaling would preview the Classical Era we were discussing in music class that day. In a way, this not only integrated reading across the curriculum, but also created a flipped-classroom environment where students learned individually before the class receive the “whole class” instruction.
  • Let’s take a look at a few minutes, and I’d like for you each to create a prompt to match a recording or music-related video you could use in your classroom. It may be something you already use or teach, or it could be something you’d like to try. (Pause)
    Now, take a moment and share your prompts with your “nearby neighbors.” (Pause)
    Is Journaling something you could use in your classroom? Is it something that would benefit your students?
    I’d like to end with a moment for questions and answers, if there are any!
    Thank you for your time.
  • Let’s take a look at a few minutes, and I’d like for you each to create a prompt to match a recording or music-related video you could use in your classroom. It may be something you already use or teach, or it could be something you’d like to try. (Pause)
    Now, take a moment and share your prompts with your “nearby neighbors.” (Pause)
    Is Journaling something you could use in your classroom? Is it something that would benefit your students?
    I’d like to end with a moment for questions and answers, if there are any!
    Thank you for your time.
  • Journaling In The Music Room

    1. 1. Journaling in the Music Classroom Travis Williamson EDIM 510 Web 2.0
    2. 2. What is Journaling? • Listening Journals • Reflection Journals • Read and Write Journals Types of Journals An opportunity for written response.
    3. 3. Standards and Journals • Journals can match content-area standards • Journals can integrate language arts standards • Adopt-An-Anchor strategy
    4. 4. How to Journal Journal begins with prompting. • Prompt with Question • Prompt with Recorded Music and Question • Prompt with Reading Material and Question • Prompt with Video Clip and Question
    5. 5. Assessment and Journals • Can be based on Grammar. • Can be based on Quantity. • Can be based on topic knowledge. • Can be assessed through discussion. • Assessment should not stifle writers.
    6. 6. Classroom Management • Used for opening or closing activities. • Can provide clear structure and expectation. • Individual writing allows for teacher coaching.
    7. 7. Journaling Tech • Classroom Stereo allows listening prompts. • PowerPoint Prompts allow images and video. • Blogging Prompts allow peer review and comment. • Other Computer, Tablet and Mobile Options.
    8. 8. Journal Samples… What feelings are expressed in this piece, and how do you know?
    9. 9. Journal Samples… What genre does this piece fit, and why?
    10. 10. Journal Samples… What mental image(s) does this recording give you?
    11. 11. Journal Samples… What inspired the people of the “Age of Enlightenment?”
    12. 12. Activity At your seat, create a prompt to match a recording or music-related video you could use in your classroom. Is this something you could use in your classroom? Questions and Answers.
    13. 13. Resources Entry with Pen Image: https://flic.kr/p/8fQsXR Closed Journal Image: https://flic.kr/p/93MJC3 Reel-to-Reel Image: https://flic.kr/p/cZa7oU Artist Easel Image: https://flic.kr/p/bihsHZ Piano Hands Image: https://flic.kr/p/38vTfb Pencil Jar Image: https://flic.kr/p/4qArjN
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