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A new partnership with parents Delivering the National Communications Campaign on Children, Young People and Alcohol David...
Our approach, ensuring long term change Building the Evidence Base
Early onset of drinking alcohol a factor in a range of harms experienced by young people: Accident and injury, sexual risk...
Policy Context – The UK has one of the highest levels of alcohol use amongst young people in Europe And young people in th...
How not to do it <ul><li>It is incredibly easy to get this sort of campaign wrong: </li></ul><ul><li>By focusing on delive...
A forensic approach <ul><li>Comprehensive evidence gathering included: </li></ul><ul><li>Initial consultation with more th...
Key Findings <ul><li>Parents have far more influence than they believe </li></ul><ul><li>- parents were one of the main so...
Key Findings (2) <ul><li>Currently, young people start drinking and form patterns of consumption before parents start talk...
I haven’t heard anything that I really understand – it goes over my head It’s my job as a parent to lead  my kids to safe ...
What we learnt about the proposition Powerful and emotive Needs direct link to alcohol consumption Preventative strategies...
Your Role <ul><li>You (or people like you) helped develop it! </li></ul><ul><li>Stakeholders and agencies working directly...
Contact details <ul><li>David Chater </li></ul><ul><li>Tel: 0114 259 3584 </li></ul><ul><li>Email: [email_address] </li></...
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A New Partnership with Parents

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Presentation from the DCSF about the Why Let Drink Decide? campaign

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  • Delivering this vision requires multi-layered attitude and behaviour change across many audiences. Drinking is a fundamental part of society, shared by almost everyone. It is therefore crucial that we develop compelling propositions for each audience, to drive the change we need
  • Transcript of "A New Partnership with Parents"

    1. 1. A new partnership with parents Delivering the National Communications Campaign on Children, Young People and Alcohol David Chater February 2010
    2. 2. Our approach, ensuring long term change Building the Evidence Base
    3. 3. Early onset of drinking alcohol a factor in a range of harms experienced by young people: Accident and injury, sexual risk taking, drug use, involvement in crime and anti social behaviour (including victimisation) Policy Context – PSA 14 (More young people on the path to success) NI 115 substance misuse amongst young people
    4. 4. Policy Context – The UK has one of the highest levels of alcohol use amongst young people in Europe And young people in the UK are the most likely to attribute positive effects to alcohol and least likely to associate negative consequences. All data from European Schools Project on Alcohol and Drugs 2007
    5. 5. How not to do it <ul><li>It is incredibly easy to get this sort of campaign wrong: </li></ul><ul><li>By focusing on delivering information, rather than changing behaviour </li></ul><ul><li>By not properly understanding the context and influences on drinking behaviour </li></ul><ul><li>By allowing people to ‘de-select’ or simply reject the message that is being delivered (i.e. where people feel they are being lectured to) </li></ul><ul><li>By being inconsistent with other implicit government messages (i.e. not part of a coherent alcohol strategy) </li></ul><ul><li>In particular, information-giving campaigns aimed at young people have had limited impact </li></ul>“ In general, across the evidence reviewed, public information campaigns have been found to be ineffective in reducing alcohol-related harms” W.H.O.
    6. 6. A forensic approach <ul><li>Comprehensive evidence gathering included: </li></ul><ul><li>Initial consultation with more than 500 parents and young people as part of the original YAAP development </li></ul><ul><li>Initial DCSF customer insight and segmentation work </li></ul><ul><li>Detailed responses to the CMO guidance from 3,000 people (with young people and parents amongst the main groups) and a further 20,000 online responses </li></ul><ul><li>Detailed field research with 12 families and a series of focus groups exploring how young people and parents discussed alcohol and their responses to the draft information leaflets </li></ul><ul><li>A review of the existing evidence base, barriers and insights to behaviour change and social marketing </li></ul>19
    7. 7. Key Findings <ul><li>Parents have far more influence than they believe </li></ul><ul><li>- parents were one of the main sources of information about alcohol cited by young people in the consultation responses. This was echoed in the Drinkaware research where 51% of young people listed said they listened to parents about alcohol </li></ul><ul><li>- the SDD survey shows a strong correlation between parental expressed attitudes to yp drinking and actual behaviour </li></ul><ul><li>- in the field research parents were found to have a significant influence on young people’s developing drinking attitudes and behaviours. However, this was rarely driven by planned, deliberate communication about alcohol by parents </li></ul>2. Dominant parenting style 3. Child’s age & developmental stage 1. Parent’s attitudes to alcohol & own drinking behaviour Interconnected factors
    8. 8. Key Findings (2) <ul><li>Currently, young people start drinking and form patterns of consumption before parents start talking to them about alcohol </li></ul><ul><li>- parents would typically start talking to young people </li></ul>8-11 yrs 13-15 yrs 15-17 yrs 17-18 yrs Aware Experimenting Established Entrenched Generally, alcohol exposure & relevance increases as YP mature: BUT, ‘lifestyle’ can speed up or slow down maturation & alcohol exposure/relevance impacting on the nature of engagement
    9. 9. I haven’t heard anything that I really understand – it goes over my head It’s my job as a parent to lead my kids to safe alcohol usage I’ve made my point, I think that’s enough It’s all about other people, not like us I don’t want to make a fuss, I’m sure they’ll be fine, we all did it It’s all too difficult to deal with I think it’s all best left alone 7 parent & carer segments Overarching ‘Attitudinal groups’ created, that shared a core common insight Parent & carer segments 12 Got Strategies No Strategies Risk to my family Not Risk to my family Overwhelmed Avoiders Uninformed Proactive Progressing Proactive Flawed Over confident Over relaxed It’s not talking to me they reject current information because it is off-putting, or even alienating, in tone and substance Non-credible information … they find the information exaggerated, irrelevant or unconvincing, so they ignore it Confusing information they find the information unclear and difficult to understand, so they can’t use it Insufficient information … they just don’t have enough information to deal with CYP drinking Not the biggest priority … they have even bigger concerns for their CYP than alcohol Avoiding own behaviour … engaging with CYP on alcohol would mean facing up to their own drinking behaviour Too uncomfortable to talk about it’s just too embarrassing - and personal - to talk about drinking too much Harsh or Helpless … like rabbits in headlights, they just don’t know what to do about the problem of alcohol Being a Guide … they discuss and model a sensible relationship with alcohol Acting as gatekeepers … providing and managing access to information and alcohol is the key An informed discussion their knowledge of their kids and of drinking means they are best placed to teach them Kids as mates … friendship with their CYP is more important than setting boundaries around drinking The ‘mass’ defence because drinking is integral to everyday adult life, it’s manageable, not worrying Safe rebellion … drinking is a safe and normal way for their children to ‘rebel’ Involvement is Pointless getting involved is a complete waste of time and may make things worse Safety through familiarity … just introducing alcohol gradually is the answer Inconsistent they want to do the right thing, but don’t really modify their own behaviour The problem is far away they are convinced that the problem is simply nowhere near them or their family Not going to be our problem the problem won’t breach the defences they’ve put in place around their family
    10. 10. What we learnt about the proposition Powerful and emotive Needs direct link to alcohol consumption Preventative strategies are vital Confronts parents who think ‘others’ are the problem General alcohol consumption not excess Child vulnerability leads to parents vulnerability The idea of ‘Vulnerability’ resonates with parents 20
    11. 11. Your Role <ul><li>You (or people like you) helped develop it! </li></ul><ul><li>Stakeholders and agencies working directly with families essential </li></ul><ul><li>Materials made available through a host of existing sites </li></ul><ul><li>Campaign ‘hub’ contains logos, workshop guides, copies of the ads and supporting materials </li></ul><ul><li>Ongoing stakeholder strategy </li></ul><ul><li>Visit www.direct.gov.uk/whyletdrinkdecide ? for more </li></ul>
    12. 12. Contact details <ul><li>David Chater </li></ul><ul><li>Tel: 0114 259 3584 </li></ul><ul><li>Email: [email_address] </li></ul>28
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