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Web search lecture september 2011
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Web search lecture september 2011

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  • Note that all the major search engines are more-or-less the same.
  • Web pages come in stylized forms…
  • On the Stanford site, point out that links are usually blue and underlined, but NOT ALWAYS. (Stanford has lots of roll-overs.)
  • Transcript

    • 1. So you think you can search? Search engines and information acces on the internet Presenter Name : Stefania Druga Client Logo
    • 2. Objectives 1 Understand what a search engine is and how information is organised on the internet 2 Be able to find specific information 3 Identify the best source for your needs 4 Compare and evaluate results
    • 3. Search engines Or how the information is organised on the internet
    • 4. 1: Search Basics
        • Some basic terms:
        • Web site: a collection of web pages on a web server
        • Browser: the software you use to view web pages
            • such as: Internet Explorer (IE), Firefox, Safari, Opera
        • Query: the terms you send to Google to ask your question
        • URL: the string that refers to the web page
        • Plugin: an extra piece of code that plugs into the browser
            • such as: Quicktime, Flash, SVG, ….
    • 5. How to read a single result Title snippet URL Yahoo’s Microsoft’s
    • 6. How to read the whole page
    • 7. Web pages (the rhetoric of…) left hand nav ads onsite links
    • 8. What’s on the search page? Address bar Google tool bar Query box Search button
    • 9. Tools point #1: Finding a word on a web page
        • How do you find something on a long, complicated web page? (like this one…)
    • 10. How to FIND on page
        • Do you know how to find something on a web page?
        • Hint: Use the Find command…
          • Edit>Find (or Control-F)
          • Note that works differently on Firefox vs. Internet Explorer
          • (Demo)
      [tomatoes] then <gardening>
    • 11. How to find-on-this-page (IE)
        • Easy reminder…
        • NOTE that when you do the find , the computer will scroll the window to that location.
    • 12. How to find on a page (Chrome)
    • 13. Find on Chrome… Type into this “find” box Note how hits are shown in the scroll bar
    • 14. Tools point #2: How to use tabs
    • 15. 2: Knowing about sites
        • A website is:
          • a collection of web pages
          • a collection of links between the pages
          • programs that do services (such as lookup things)
          • tracking services (that watch users as they use the site)
      Demo: links / pages http://www.stanford.edu Demo: rollover link to see address Demo: offsite links (e.g., to YouTube) www.foo.com
    • 16. Sites often have their OWN search
        • Sometimes a site’s search tool can be very effective
          • More up-to-date with latest information
          • Might index parts of the website not visible to search engines
          • (And sometimes… not…)
    • 17. But…
        • Sometimes a site’s own search engine isn’t very effective
          • Their search engine might not be sophisticated
          • Their search engine might not cover the things you think are in the web site!
        • In such cases, it’s much better to back up and use an external search engine
      IMDB is great, but don’t try looking for the actor who won the most Oscars here….
    • 18. How the web works…
        • Visible web: everything that’s indexed by search engines
        • Deep web: everything that’s on the web, but not indexed!
          • Sometimes called the “invisible web”
      * * Demo: http://data.bls.gov/cgi-bin/surveymost?fi (Bureau of Labor Statistics databases)
    • 19. 3: How to organize a search
        • THINK FOR A SECOND!
        • What is it I’m looking for?
          • (think about common keywords)
        • How would someone else talk about it?
          • (what words would they use? how would THEY describe it?)
        • Which of those terms would be most common?
        • Which of those terms would be very specialized to this topic?
        • What kind of thing would make me happy?
          • (do I want a single web page, a definition, a collection, an image.... or … ?)
      Big tip!
    • 20. Great gateway sites:
        • www.cia.gov – primarily for international facts, data
        • www.wikipedia.com – wide-ranging encyclopedia on many topics
        • www.reference.com – another encyclopedia
        • www.about.com – tutorials, articles on many DIY topics, sports, hobbies, etc.
        • Many gateway / background sites exist on particular topics:
          • Tip : to find gateway sites, include “how-to” or “DIY”
          • Try : [ model airplanes how-to ]
    • 21. Demonstration: Go to gateway, learn key terms , then search
        • Example:
          • What are the Easter Island statues called? (What’s the special term?)
          • [ Easter Island statues ]
        • “ low frequency” terms don’t occur very often, except in the context of what you’re trying to lookup (that means they’re rare.. and precise!)
        • Demo: [ moai ]
        • Demo: [ raft ]
          • “ raft” also means something else… what’s this other stuff on the SERP??
        • Try: [ raft water ]
    • 22. The Art of Keyword Choice
    • 23. Hints to choose keywords…
        • Think about what you’re trying to find
        • Choose words that you think will appear on the page
        • Put yourself in the mindset of the author of those words
    • 24. Keywords: Naming the un-namable I noticed the other day that everyone has a little indentation on their upper lip. Question: What’s that thing called?
    • 25. Answer
        • Start with the simplest search you can think of:
      • [ upper lip indentation ] If it’s not right, you can always modify it.
        • When I did this, I clicked on the first result, which took me to Yahoo Answers. There’s a nice article there about something called the philtrum .
        • Then I double checked on that by doing a [ define:philtrum ]
    • 26. DEFINE:
        • A very useful thing to have…
        • Pattern:
        • [ DEFINE: <term or phrase> ]
        • Examples:
          • [ define:philtrum ]
          • [ define:paramecium ]
          • [ define:zero day attack ]
    • 27.  When you’re choosing search keywords…
        • When you eat pig, the meat is called “pork.” When you eat sheep, the meat is called “mutton.” When you eat deer, the meat is called “venison.”
    • 28. Exercise: Thinking about synonyms…
        • Suppose you visit your cousin in Sydney, Australia and they serve grilled kangaroo. What’s another word for “kangaroo meat”?
    • 29. Activity
    • 30. Activity
      • Find a search question. Think about a subject or a person that you would like to know more about.
      • Got to: http://www.noodletools.com/noodlequest and check the boxes that correspond to your question.
      • Follow the search strategy.
      • Present the result!
    • 31.  
    • 32.  
    • 33. Thank You! Resources and materials used from the repository created by Dan Russell- https://sites.google.com/site/gwebsearcheducation/

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