Well balanced child

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Well balanced child

  1. 1. © 2007 Peter Pan PotentialAll rights reserved.Well-TheBalancedChild
  2. 2. © 2007 Peter Pan PotentialAll rights reserved.Every parent wants to raise the perfect child:healthy, happy, loved and respected withhigh achievements and even higher goals.
  3. 3. © 2007 Peter Pan PotentialAll rights reserved.We want our children to “have the things wedidn’t have” and to achieve their dreams.This is all well and good, unless we becomeso focused on our desires for our child thatwe forget what’s inherently best for the child.
  4. 4. © 2007 Peter Pan PotentialAll rights reserved.This phrase has beencoined to describe adangerous trend inchild rearing in middleand upper-middleclass homes.Hyper-Parenting
  5. 5. © 2007 Peter Pan PotentialAll rights reserved.Hyper-ParentingParents become overlyinvolved in every detailof their children’s lives:• Academically• Athletically• Socially
  6. 6. © 2007 Peter Pan PotentialAll rights reserved.Hyper-ParentingDespite a parent’sheartfelt desire to helptheir children succeed,hyper-parenting actuallyhinders them by notallowing them to simplybe children.
  7. 7. © 2007 Peter Pan PotentialAll rights reserved.Children today are getting so much more thanjust basic schooling. Many participate in severalof the following extra-curricular activities:• Sports• Clubs• Music lessons• Art lessons• Foreign language lessons• Necessary tutoringOver-Activities
  8. 8. © 2007 Peter Pan PotentialAll rights reserved.Over-ActivitiesIndividually these activitiesare valuable but combinedthey can leave parents andchildren frazzled.Some parents claim thatthey involve their children inthese activities to avoid therisk of boredom.
  9. 9. © 2007 Peter Pan PotentialAll rights reserved.Over-ActivitiesDon’t forget that boredomis a catalyst for creativityand can fuel a child’simagination.Over-scheduling a childdoesn’t allow them theopportunity to exercisetheir innate ability toentertain themselves.
  10. 10. © 2007 Peter Pan PotentialAll rights reserved.Raising the perfect child hasalmost become a competitivesport with the prizes being:Competitive-Parenting• Speaking early• Qualifying for gifted ortalented programs• Early acceptance to anelite university
  11. 11. © 2007 Peter Pan PotentialAll rights reserved.Alvin Rosenfeld, M.D., theauthor of “The Over-ScheduledChild” says that competitiveparents are reacting to all the“latest science reported in themedia, which professionalsknow is of dubious validity.”Competitive-Parenting
  12. 12. © 2007 Peter Pan PotentialAll rights reserved.“In response to this science parents are playingMozart in their infant’s nurseries, enrollingtoddlers in organized gymnastics programs andputting children too young to comprehend therules in competitive team sports; all for the sakeof raising the perfect child.”- Alvin Rosenfeld, M.D.Competitive-Parenting
  13. 13. © 2007 Peter Pan PotentialAll rights reserved.Where is this pressure coming from?Why do parents feel this overwhelmingdrive to push their children to not onlysucceed but to excel?© 2007 Peter Pan PotentialAll rights reserved.
  14. 14. © 2007 Peter Pan PotentialAll rights reserved.There was a time whenDr. Spock urged parentsto trust themselves andtheir instincts.Not so today, whenexperts imply that eachdecision made for childrenwill have crucial futureimplications.The Experts
  15. 15. © 2007 Peter Pan PotentialAll rights reserved.With their tone ofurgency and authority,these experts raiseparental anxiety to afever pitch and bringout the worst in allconcerned.The Experts
  16. 16. © 2007 Peter Pan PotentialAll rights reserved.School PressureSchools react to the pressureplaced on them to showresults for the tax dollarsthey’ve been receiving byplacing higher demands onchildren. This is in the formof increased homework thatis supposed to enhancefuture performance.
  17. 17. © 2007 Peter Pan PotentialAll rights reserved.Parental PressureParents mistakenly believethat if their child reads earlythat they’ll score higher ontheir verbal SATs whenthey’re older.So, they push their childrento achieve milestones earlyexpecting that this will helpthem in the future.
  18. 18. © 2007 Peter Pan PotentialAll rights reserved.We have to wonder how this is affecting the children.What are the children feeling when faced with an endlessparade of activities?What damage is being done to a developing self-esteem?
  19. 19. © 2007 Peter Pan PotentialAll rights reserved.Subliminal MessageThe message kids get fromthis constant scrutiny andhyperactivity is that theyare inadequate in theircurrent unpolished state.They convince themselvesthat if they were acceptablethey wouldn’t need all of thisextra enrichment.
  20. 20. © 2007 Peter Pan PotentialAll rights reserved.Subliminal MessageThey begin to feel inadequateor inferior and try escapinginto video games.Taken to the extreme thesechildren begin feeling likethey’ll never measure upanyway and go so far asto drop out of school.
  21. 21. © 2007 Peter Pan PotentialAll rights reserved.It’s been determined thatHyper-parenting may alsobe a contributing factor tothe increased incidencesof teenage depression andsubstance abuse.Additional Danger
  22. 22. © 2007 Peter Pan PotentialAll rights reserved.FiveSimple StepsTo PreventHyper-Parenting
  23. 23. © 2007 Peter Pan PotentialAll rights reserved.Step #5Family time – makeeating mealstogether a priority.
  24. 24. © 2007 Peter Pan PotentialAll rights reserved.Step #4Keep it simple -limit your child tojust one outsideactivity.
  25. 25. © 2007 Peter Pan PotentialAll rights reserved.Step #3Don’t be too quickto say “yes’ tonew activities.
  26. 26. © 2007 Peter Pan PotentialAll rights reserved.Step #2Trust your instincts:if it feels like it maybe too much, itprobably is.
  27. 27. © 2007 Peter Pan PotentialAll rights reserved.Step #1Get adjusted regularlyand ask your FamilyChiropractor for adviceon how to createwellness and balancefor your child.
  28. 28. © 2007 Peter Pan PotentialAll rights reserved.Your Doctor of Chiropractic is dedicated to yourfamily’s overall health and wellness. Take a momenttoday to ask your Family Wellness Chiropractor howto create a family wellness environment.
  29. 29. © 2007 Peter Pan PotentialAll rights reserved.
  30. 30. © 2007 Peter Pan PotentialAll rights reserved.
  31. 31. © 2007 Peter Pan PotentialAll rights reserved.How to Contact Us…Gregson Health Chiropractic425 Winter StreetMadawaska, ME 04756P: (207) 436-1256www.GregsonHealth.comDrGregson@GregsonHealth.com

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