Eight Kinds of Smart - Responding to Student Diversity with Engaging Learning Strategies
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Eight Kinds of Smart - Responding to Student Diversity with Engaging Learning Strategies

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These are handouts from a workshop I did for teachers at the Yav Pem Suab Academy and the Joseph Bonnheim Elementary School in Sacramento, California, on April 26, 2013.

These are handouts from a workshop I did for teachers at the Yav Pem Suab Academy and the Joseph Bonnheim Elementary School in Sacramento, California, on April 26, 2013.

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  • I’d like to ask a question to begin this presentation. How many people know their IQ score? Let’s have a show of hands. Don’t worry, I’m not going to ask you what that score is! Okay, now, let’s have another show of hands. How many people are glad that they DON’T know what their IQ score is? Yah, who needs another thing to worry about at night?
  • But think about it for a moment. Here’s what we do to find out how intelligent somebody is in our society: We take them out of their natural living and learning environment Put them in a room they’ve never been in before Sit them across the table from someone they’ve never met before (the testing examiner) And make them do things that they’ve never done before (and would never choose to do again on their own), and on the basis of all that, they’re given a score – an IQ score – which represents their intelligence. As a special education teacher, we used to use the IQ score as a measure of a student’s POTENTIAL! I
  • If your car breaks down, who do you want: a guy with a high IQ score, or someone who knows car engines?
  • If you get lost in the woods, who do you want helping you: a person with a high IQ score, or someone familiar with natural surroundings and a good sense of direction.
  • If you have a conflict with your boss at work, who you do want helping you: a person with a high IQ, or an individual who has skill in human relations, counseling, and conflict mediation?
  • He suggested that instead of only one intelligence there are at least eight of them.
  • This is the intelligence of talking, writing, reading. You can see this very early babies babbling. You see the toddler picking up books and pretending to read them, picking up paper and pretending to write. You see some young child actually learn to read and write at three and four, while other kids won’t do this until they’re eight or nine.
  • This is logic smart (or number smart). This is the intelligence of numbers and logic – the intelligence of the scientist and mathematician, the computer programmer, the accountant. Jean Piaget told us that even babies are developing this intelligence as they try to figure out how things happen in the crib – they’re like little scientists experimenting. You see young kids play in logical ways, experimenting with blocks, or creating patterns (3 red blocks, 2 yellow blocks etc.).
  • This is picture smart, the intelligence of pictures and images – both inside of us and outside of us. We know young kids often have eidetic imagery – they see inner images as clearly as we do outer perceptions (which is why nightmares can be so frightening to them). We see young children drawing very early – some show greater interest and ability at an early age. This also shows up in block play – interesting structures.
  • This is body smart. The intelligence of the whole body and the intelligence of the hands. Piaget called the earliest stage of thinking the sensori-motor, because the infant thinks with his body. Young kids work out their thinking, not in their heads, but in their hands, building, shaping, forming as they work with blocks, wood, finger paint, etc. Kids show this in dance, in sports, in being dramatic with their body in expressing themselves. As they grow up some kids continue to need to move to learn – some of these kids get labeled ADHD, but we need to recognize they need more movement.
  • This introduces music smart. Some psychologists believe that musical intelligence begins in the womb with the mother’s heartbeat. But right away we can see it in the way that baby responds to music, that the toddler bangs on pots and pans, the young child gravitates toward simple musical instruments. This is an important intelligence – before reading, most cultures transmitted knowledge through music.
  • Most young children are social animals – although we’re learning more and more about kids who have tremendous difficulty in this area – kids on the autistic spectrum – this intelligence is certainly nurtured by the bonding with the mother and significant others – but there’s a lot here to learn – interpret social cues – learn procedures for becoming a friend, for sharing a toy – some are really good at this, some really need work -
  • This is the intelligence of knowing who you are. This is something that doesn’t happen right away – like people smart it takes time for kids to get good at this – they need to have experiences – fail – overcome challenges – get feedback from the world – some kids show this by early on having a sense of self-confidence, self-direction, working well on their own, independent spirit -
  • Nature smart was added about fifteen years ago. Intelligence of the kids who wants to find out about dinosaurs, who loves lizards, who loves the outdoors – we has a rapport with animals – a green thumb – an ecological sensibility -
  • Experiments with rats at U.C. Berkeley in the 1960’s – describe experiment – different environments – more stimulation – don’t know if all the multiple intelligences were stimulated! -- but certainly body smart, rat smart, etc.
  • This is what they discovered (and replicated in the 1990’s) – here you see a neuron on the left from a rat in an enriched environment – more dendrites than the rat in the isolated cage – connections to other brain cells – a richer more complex brain -
  • Picture of preschool library
  • experimenting
  • Drawing and painting
  • Playing music
  • Outdoor experiences – physical exercise -
  • Learning about nature -
  • Socially interacting
  • Time to spend by oneself thinking, dreaming, reflecting
  • He suggested that instead of only one intelligence there are at least eight of them.
  • If we only use one intelligence – the IQ intelligence - to think about a child’s potential, then we’ve only got one note to work with (bong!) - And if we keep on using that limited concept of who a child as that child grows up– we’re always using this same one note (bong bong bong bong) – Aren’t there some cultures that have torture methods that are similar to this? On the other hand, if we recognize that each and every child has at least eight intelligence (go up the scale) Eight areas of the brain to be nurtured and stimulated (play twinkle twinkle little star) Eight ways to help them grow and achieve success in life (play happy birthday to you) Then, we’ll soon realize that there’s no end to the beautiful music that this child can contribute toward making the world a better place in which to live! (make a twill) – Thank you very much!

Eight Kinds of Smart - Responding to Student Diversity with Engaging Learning Strategies Eight Kinds of Smart - Responding to Student Diversity with Engaging Learning Strategies Presentation Transcript

  • 8 Kinds of Smart:Responding to Student Diversity with EngagingLearning StrategiesThomas Armstrong, Ph.D. (www.institute4learning.com)Urban Charter Schools CollectiveSacramento, CAApril 26, 2013.
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  • The Eight IntelligencesThe Eight Intelligences Word SmartWord Smart
  • Jennifers brother Matthew hasone more brother than he hassisters How many more brothersthan sisters does Jennifer have?
  • The Eight IntelligencesThe Eight Intelligences Word SmartWord Smart Logic SmartLogic Smart
  • Visualize in as much detail as possible:•Your bedroom•A yellow hippo with orange spots in apink tutu•Your mother on the ceiling•A photo of Barack Obama0Nothing10Likeoutersights
  • The Eight IntelligencesThe Eight Intelligences Word SmartWord Smart Logic SmartLogic Smart Picture SmartPicture Smart
  • Stand Off•Choose a partner about your same height•Stand facing each other at arms length•Bend your knees slightly•Count: one….two…three…•Then attempt to put your partner offbalance•You can make contact only with yourpartner’s palms•Two out of three wins
  • The Eight IntelligencesThe Eight Intelligences Word SmartWord Smart Logic SmartLogic Smart Picture SmartPicture Smart Body SmartBody Smart
  • Listen in your mind’s ear to:•The sound of rain on the roof•Your favorite popular song•The sound of a violin playing•A large group of people singing‘’Three Blind Mice’’ as a round•Any song you loved as a child10Likeoutersights0Nothing
  • The Eight IntelligencesThe Eight Intelligences Word SmartWord Smart Logic SmartLogic Smart Picture SmartPicture Smart Body SmartBody Smart Music SmartMusic Smart
  • To discuss (one minute each):•A student you’ve had (present orpast) who is particularly good at‘’pushing your buttons’’
  • The Eight IntelligencesThe Eight Intelligences Word SmartWord Smart Logic SmartLogic Smart Picture SmartPicture Smart Body SmartBody Smart Music SmartMusic Smart People SmartPeople Smart
  • Reflect on:•Your most important goal forthe future.•The biggest mistake you’ve evermade in your past.Note: You will not share this!
  • The Eight IntelligencesThe Eight Intelligences Word SmartWord Smart Logic SmartLogic Smart Picture SmartPicture Smart Body SmartBody Smart Music SmartMusic Smart People SmartPeople Smart Self SmartSelf Smart
  • The Eight IntelligencesThe Eight Intelligences Word SmartWord Smart Logic SmartLogic Smart Picture SmartPicture Smart Body SmartBody Smart Music SmartMusic Smart People SmartPeople Smart Self SmartSelf Smart Nature SmartNature Smart
  • The Nine Intelligences?The Nine Intelligences? Word SmartWord Smart• Logic Smart• Picture Smart• Body Smart• Music Smart• People Smart• Self Smart• Nature Smart• Life Smart ?
  • MI and HETMI and HET Biologically Based LearningBiologically Based Learning
  • (PictureSmart)((((Music Smart) (Body Smart)(People andSelf Smart)(Logic andNature Smart)Word Smart
  • Source: Rosenzweig, M. R., Bennett, E. L., & Diamond, M. C. (1972). Brainchanges in response to experience. Scientific American, 226, 22-29.S
  • Source: Bryan Kolb, Margaret Forgie, Robbin Grazyna Gorny, Sharon Rowntree, Age, Experience and theChanging Brain, Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Review, March 1998
  • MI and HETMI and HET Biologically Based LearningBiologically Based Learning Enriched Learning EnvironmentEnriched Learning Environment
  • MI and HETMI and HET Biologically Based LearningBiologically Based Learning Enriched Learning EnvironmentEnriched Learning Environment Life Skills = Personal IntelligencesLife Skills = Personal Intelligences
  • LIFESKILLS•CARING – To feel and show concern for others•COMMON SENSE – To use good judgment•COOPERATION – To work together toward a common goal or purpose•COURAGE – To act according to one’s beliefs despite fear of adverse consequences•CREATIVITY – To generate ideas; To create something original or redesign through imaginative skill•CURIOSITY – A desire to investigate and seek understanding of one’s world•EFFORT – To do your best•FLEXIBILITY – To be willing to alter plans when necessary•FRIENDSHIP – To make and keep a friend through mutual trust and caring•INITIATIVE – To do something, of one’s own free will, because it needs to be done•INTEGRITY – To act according to a sense of what’s right and wrong•ORGANIZATION – To plan, arrange, and implement in an orderly way; to keep things orderly and ready to use•PATIENCE – To wait calmly for someone or something•PERSEVERANCE – To keep at it•PRIDE – Satisfaction from doing one’s personal best•PROBLEM SOLVING – To create solutions to difficult situations and everyday problems•RESOURCEFULNESS – To respond to challenges and opportunities in innovative•RESPONSIBILITY – To respond when appropriate; to be accountable for one’s actions•SENSE OF HUMOR – To laugh and be playful without harming others
  • MI and HETMI and HET Biologically Based LearningBiologically Based Learning Enriched Learning EnvironmentEnriched Learning Environment Life Skills = Personal IntelligencesLife Skills = Personal Intelligences Lifelong Guidelines = Personal IntelligencesLifelong Guidelines = Personal Intelligences
  • Lifelong Guidelines•TRUSTWORTHINESS – To act in a manner that makes oneworthy of trust and confidence•TRUTHFULNESS – To be honest about things and feelingswith oneself and others•ACTIVE LISTENING – To listen with the intention ofunderstanding what the speaker intends to communicate•NO PUT-DOWNS – To never use words, actions and/or bodylanguage that degrade, humiliate, or dishonor others•PERSONAL BEST – To do one’s best given thecircumstances and available resources
  • MI and HETMI and HET Biologically Based LearningBiologically Based Learning Enriched Learning EnvironmentEnriched Learning Environment Life Skills = Personal IntelligencesLife Skills = Personal Intelligences Lifelong Guidelines = Personal IntelligencesLifelong Guidelines = Personal Intelligences One of Five Learning PrinciplesOne of Five Learning Principles
  • ‘’There are multiple intelligences (ways of solvingproblems and/or producing products)’’
  • MI and HETMI and HET Biologically Based LearningBiologically Based Learning Enriched Learning EnvironmentEnriched Learning Environment Life Skills = Personal IntelligencesLife Skills = Personal Intelligences Lifelong Guidelines = Personal IntelligencesLifelong Guidelines = Personal Intelligences One of Five Learning PrinciplesOne of Five Learning Principles Instructional StrategiesInstructional Strategies
  • Thinking MinuteThinking Minute Reflect on something interesting youReflect on something interesting youjust learned.just learned.• Reflect on something that’s stillunclear to you.
  • Sharing MinuteSharing Minute Share something interesting you justShare something interesting you justlearned.learned.• Share something that’s still unclearto you.
  • Introducing MI to Your StudentsIntroducing MI to Your Students MI PizzaMI Pizza
  • SelfSmartWordSmartNumber/LogicSmartPictureSmartBodySmartMusicSmartNatureSmartPeopleSmartMI Pizza
  • Introducing MI to Your StudentsIntroducing MI to Your Students MI PizzaMI Pizza• Experiences
  • Human Intelligence HuntHuman Intelligence Hunt Find Someone Who Can:Find Someone Who Can:– whistle Mozart (M)whistle Mozart (M)– do a dance step (BK)do a dance step (BK)– recite four lines of poetry (L)recite four lines of poetry (L)– draw a picture of a horse (S)draw a picture of a horse (S)– share a dream they’ve had (Intra)share a dream they’ve had (Intra)– explain why the sky is blue (LM)explain why the sky is blue (LM)– say they’re feeling relaxed now (Inter)say they’re feeling relaxed now (Inter)– name 5 common birds in this area (N)name 5 common birds in this area (N)
  • Introducing MI to Your StudentsIntroducing MI to Your Students MI PizzaMI Pizza• Experiences• Games
  • Introducing MI to Your StudentsIntroducing MI to Your Students MI PizzaMI Pizza• Experiences• Games• People
  • Introducing MI to Your StudentsIntroducing MI to Your Students MI PizzaMI Pizza• Experiences• Games• People• Trips
  • Introducing MI to Your StudentsIntroducing MI to Your Students MI PizzaMI Pizza• Experiences• Games• People• Trips• Displays
  • Introducing MI to Your StudentsIntroducing MI to Your Students MI PizzaMI Pizza• Experiences• Games• People• Trips• Displays• Books
  • Human Intelligence HuntHuman Intelligence Hunt Find Someone Who Can:Find Someone Who Can:– whistle Mozart (M)whistle Mozart (M)– do a dance step (BK)do a dance step (BK)– recite four lines of poetry (L)recite four lines of poetry (L)– draw a picture of a horse (S)draw a picture of a horse (S)– share a dream they’ve had (Intra)share a dream they’ve had (Intra)– explain why the sky is blue (LM)explain why the sky is blue (LM)– say they’re feeling relaxed now (Inter)say they’re feeling relaxed now (Inter)– name 5 common birds in this area (N)name 5 common birds in this area (N)
  • NeurodiversityNeurodiversityAn idea which asserts that atypicalAn idea which asserts that atypical(neurodivergent) neurological(neurodivergent) neurologicaldevelopment is a normal humandevelopment is a normal humandifference that is to be recognized anddifference that is to be recognized andrespected as any other human variation.respected as any other human variation.
  • Niche ConstructionNiche Construction• Helping to ensure the thriving of anorganism by directly modifying theenvironment in such a way that itenhances that organism’s chances forsurvival.
  • Positive Niche ConstructionPositive Niche Construction• Helping to ensure the thriving of achild by directly modifying theenvironment in such a way that itenhances that child’s chances forsuccess.
  • Positive Niche ConstructionPositive Niche Construction Strength AwarenessStrength Awareness
  • Positive Niche ConstructionPositive Niche Construction Strength AwarenessStrength Awareness– Autistic Spectrum DisorderAutistic Spectrum Disorder
  • 05/03/13 89Happé, F. (1999) ‘Understanding assets and deficits in autism: why success is more interestingthan failure’, Spearman Medal Lecture, The Psychologist, vol. 12, no. 11, November 1999
  • 05/03/13 90Source: Wikimedia Commons
  • 05/03/13 91
  • Positive Niche ConstructionPositive Niche Construction Strength AwarenessStrength Awareness– Autistic Spectrum DisorderAutistic Spectrum Disorder– Learning DisabilitiesLearning Disabilities
  • 94Source: Wikimedia Commons
  • 95
  • Positive Niche ConstructionPositive Niche Construction Strength AwarenessStrength Awareness– Autistic Spectrum DisorderAutistic Spectrum Disorder– Learning DisabilitiesLearning Disabilities– ADD/ADHDADD/ADHD
  • 97
  • 05/03/13 99
  • NEOTENYNO NEOTENY
  • Positive Niche ConstructionPositive Niche Construction Strength AwarenessStrength Awareness– Autistic Spectrum DisorderAutistic Spectrum Disorder– Learning DisabilitiesLearning Disabilities– ADD/ADHDADD/ADHD– Intellectual DisabilitiesIntellectual Disabilities
  • Source: Vicky Broadus, Lexington (KY) Herald Leader
  • Positive Niche ConstructionPositive Niche Construction Strength AwarenessStrength Awareness– Autistic Spectrum DisorderAutistic Spectrum Disorder– Learning DisabilitiesLearning Disabilities– ADD/ADHDADD/ADHD– Intellectual DisabilitiesIntellectual Disabilities– Emotional and Behavioral DisordersEmotional and Behavioral Disorders
  • Identifying Strengths in StudentsIdentifying Strengths in Students ObservationObservation
  • Identifying Strengths in StudentsIdentifying Strengths in Students ObservationObservation• Documentation
  • Identifying Strengths in StudentsIdentifying Strengths in Students ObservationObservation• Documentation• Cum Files
  • Identifying Strengths in StudentsIdentifying Strengths in Students ObservationObservation• Documentation• Cum Files• Colleagues
  • Identifying Strengths in StudentsIdentifying Strengths in Students ObservationObservation• Documentation• Cum Files• Colleagues• Parents
  • Identifying Strengths in StudentsIdentifying Strengths in Students ObservationObservation• Documentation• Cum Files• Colleagues• Parents• Students
  • Neurodiversity Strengths ChecklistNeurodiversity Strengths ChecklistPersonal StrengthsPersonal Strengths___ Enjoys working independently___ Enjoys working independently___ Has a good sense of his/her personal strengths and___ Has a good sense of his/her personal strengths andweaknessesweaknesses___ Learns from past mistakes___ Learns from past mistakes___ Has persistence in carrying out assignments or activities___ Has persistence in carrying out assignments or activities___ Is courageous in dealing with adversity and/or the___ Is courageous in dealing with adversity and/or theunknownunknown___ Keeps a personal diary or journal___ Keeps a personal diary or journal___ Has a good sense of humor___ Has a good sense of humor___ Possesses a sense of responsibility___ Possesses a sense of responsibility___ Has strong opinions about controversial topics___ Has strong opinions about controversial topics___ Marches to the beat of a different drummer___ Marches to the beat of a different drummer___ Handles stressful events well (e.g. is resilient)___ Handles stressful events well (e.g. is resilient)___ Has good character (e.g. honesty, integrity, fairness)___ Has good character (e.g. honesty, integrity, fairness)___ Has the ability to set realistic goals for him/herself___ Has the ability to set realistic goals for him/herself___ Has a sense of confidence or high self-esteem___ Has a sense of confidence or high self-esteem___ Has good self-discipline___ Has good self-discipline___ Has personal ambitions in life___ Has personal ambitions in life___ Displays good common sense___ Displays good common sense___ Possesses personal vitality, vigor, or energy___ Possesses personal vitality, vigor, or energyCommunication StrengthsCommunication Strengths___ Explains ideas or concepts well to others___ Explains ideas or concepts well to others___ Asks good questions___ Asks good questions___ Is a good storyteller___ Is a good storyteller___ Is a good joke teller___ Is a good joke teller___ Has good listening skills___ Has good listening skills___ Handles verbal feedback (especially negative feedback)___ Handles verbal feedback (especially negative feedback)wellwell___ Has good articulation ability___ Has good articulation ability___ Is able to effectively use non-verbal cues to communicate___ Is able to effectively use non-verbal cues to communicatewith otherswith others___ Is persuasive in getting someone to do something___ Is persuasive in getting someone to do something___ Has good assertive skills without being pushy___ Has good assertive skills without being pushyEmotional StrengthsEmotional Strengths____ Is emotionally sensitive to perceiving the world around____ Is emotionally sensitive to perceiving the world aroundhim/herhim/her____ Has an optimistic attitude toward life____ Has an optimistic attitude toward life____ Can tell how he/she is feeling at any given moment____ Can tell how he/she is feeling at any given moment____ Can easily pick up on the emotional state of another____ Can easily pick up on the emotional state of anotherpersonperson____ Is able to handle strong internal feelings in a____ Is able to handle strong internal feelings in aconstructive mannerconstructive manner____ Receives gut feelings about things____ Receives gut feelings about thingsFrom: Thomas Armstrong, Neurodiversity in the Classroom: Strength-Based Strategies to HelpStudents with Special Needs Succeed in School and Life. Alexandria, VA: ASCD, 2012."Reproduced with permission. Learn more about ASCD at www.ascd.org."
  • Neurodiversity Strengths ChecklistNeurodiversity Strengths ChecklistSocial StrengthsSocial Strengths___ Has leadership ability___ Has leadership ability___ Has a good sense of empathy for others___ Has a good sense of empathy for others___ Enjoys socializing with others___ Enjoys socializing with others___ Is good at helping others___ Is good at helping others___ Is kind or affectionate towards others___ Is kind or affectionate towards others___ Has at least one good friend___ Has at least one good friend___ Prefers working with others___ Prefers working with others___ Likes to play board games and/or card games with others___ Likes to play board games and/or card games with others___ Has skill in refereeing disputes conflicts between___ Has skill in refereeing disputes conflicts betweenclassmatesclassmates___ Is polite and has good manners___ Is polite and has good manners___ Is able to work out his/her own conflicts with others___ Is able to work out his/her own conflicts with others___ Works well in groups___ Works well in groups___ Volunteers his/her time in some worthy cause___ Volunteers his/her time in some worthy cause___ Belongs to at least one club or social group (e.g. Scouts.)___ Belongs to at least one club or social group (e.g. Scouts.)___ Has a good relationship with at least one family member___ Has a good relationship with at least one family member___ Is friendly to others___ Is friendly to others___ Is good at sharing with others___ Is good at sharing with others___ Follows class rules___ Follows class rules___ Has a good relationship with at least one teacher in the___ Has a good relationship with at least one teacher in theschoolschool___ Has good personal hygiene___ Has good personal hygiene___ Trusts others without being taken in___ Trusts others without being taken in___ Is liked by his peers___ Is liked by his peersCognitive StrengthsCognitive Strengths___ Has good organizational skills___ Has good organizational skills___ Has good study skills___ Has good study skills___ Is able to use cognitive strategies (e.g. self-talk) in___ Is able to use cognitive strategies (e.g. self-talk) insolving problemssolving problems___ Is able to pay close attention to details___ Is able to pay close attention to details___ Has a good short-term and/or long-term___ Has a good short-term and/or long-termmemorymemory___ Is able to think ahead___ Is able to think ahead___ Is able to become totally absorbed in an activity___ Is able to become totally absorbed in an activity___ Can easily divide his attention between two or more___ Can easily divide his attention between two or moreactivitiesactivitiesCultural StrengthsCultural Strengths___ Has traveled to other countries___ Has traveled to other countries___ Speaks more than one language___ Speaks more than one language___ Is tolerant of others who have cultural, ethnic, or racial___ Is tolerant of others who have cultural, ethnic, or racialdifferencesdifferences___ Has pride in his/her own cultural, ethnic, or racial___ Has pride in his/her own cultural, ethnic, or racialbackgroundbackground___ Likes to find out about historical events around the world___ Likes to find out about historical events around the world___ Enjoys learning about different cultural traditions___ Enjoys learning about different cultural traditionsFrom: Thomas Armstrong, Neurodiversity in the Classroom: Strength-Based Strategies to HelpStudents with Special Needs Succeed in School and Life. Alexandria, VA: ASCD, 2012."Reproduced with permission. Learn more about ASCD at www.ascd.org."
  • Neurodiversity Strengths ChecklistNeurodiversity Strengths ChecklistLiteracy StrengthsLiteracy Strengths___ Enjoys reading books___ Enjoys reading books___ Has good reading comprehension___ Has good reading comprehension___ Enjoys doing word puzzles or playing word games___ Enjoys doing word puzzles or playing word games___ Is a good writer in one or more genres (e.g. poetry,___ Is a good writer in one or more genres (e.g. poetry,stories, reports, letters)stories, reports, letters)___ Is a good speller___ Is a good speller___ Has a large vocabulary___ Has a large vocabulary___ Enjoys listening to audio books or to someone telling a___ Enjoys listening to audio books or to someone telling astory or reading out loudstory or reading out loudLogical StrengthsLogical Strengths___ Does well in science class___ Does well in science class___ Can estimate things easily___ Can estimate things easily___ Enjoys working with numbers and/or statistics___ Enjoys working with numbers and/or statistics___ Is good at solving math problems___ Is good at solving math problems___ Has a chemistry set or other science kit that he/she works with___ Has a chemistry set or other science kit that he/she works withat homeat home___ Has an interest in astronomy, chemistry, physics, or biology___ Has an interest in astronomy, chemistry, physics, or biology___ Enjoys logical or number games or puzzles like Rubik’s cube___ Enjoys logical or number games or puzzles like Rubik’s cubeor Sudokuor Sudoku___ Can easily calculate numbers in his/her head___ Can easily calculate numbers in his/her headVisual-Spatial StrengthsVisual-Spatial Strengths___ Has an aptitude for fixing machines___ Has an aptitude for fixing machines___ Likes to create three-dimensional structures with building___ Likes to create three-dimensional structures with buildingmaterialsmaterials___ Is good at doing jigsaw puzzles or other visual puzzles___ Is good at doing jigsaw puzzles or other visual puzzles___ Is able to read maps well___ Is able to read maps well___ Reports being able to visualize images clearly___ Reports being able to visualize images clearly___ Gets information more easily through pictures than words___ Gets information more easily through pictures than words___ Is sensitive to the visual world around him/her___ Is sensitive to the visual world around him/herPhysical StrengthsPhysical Strengths___ Has a good sense of balance___ Has a good sense of balance___ Learns material best when moving around___ Learns material best when moving around___ Likes to ride his/her bike, skateboard, and/or other self-powered___ Likes to ride his/her bike, skateboard, and/or other self-poweredpersonal vehiclepersonal vehicle___ Is good at playing team sports like baseball, soccer, basketball, or___ Is good at playing team sports like baseball, soccer, basketball, orfootballfootball___ Is good at playing individual sports like tennis, swimming,___ Is good at playing individual sports like tennis, swimming,gymnastics, or golfgymnastics, or golf___ Is in good physical health___ Is in good physical health___ Likes to dance___ Likes to dance___ Is physically strong___ Is physically strong___ Is a fast runner or has other athletic abilities___ Is a fast runner or has other athletic abilities___ Likes to exercise (e.g. weights, aerobics, jogging, treadmill)___ Likes to exercise (e.g. weights, aerobics, jogging, treadmill)___ Has good physical endurance___ Has good physical endurance___ Has good physical flexibility___ Has good physical flexibilityFrom: Thomas Armstrong, Neurodiversity in the Classroom: Strength-Based Strategies to HelpStudents with Special Needs Succeed in School and Life. Alexandria, VA: ASCD, 2012."Reproduced with permission. Learn more about ASCD at www.ascd.org."
  • Neurodiversity Strengths ChecklistNeurodiversity Strengths ChecklistDexterity StrengthsDexterity Strengths___ Has a hobby building model cars, planes, ships or other___ Has a hobby building model cars, planes, ships or othersimilar projectssimilar projects___ Displays good handwriting___ Displays good handwriting___ Likes to juggle or do magic tricks___ Likes to juggle or do magic tricks___ Enjoys hand crafts like knitting, crocheting, embroidery,___ Enjoys hand crafts like knitting, crocheting, embroidery,or needlepointor needlepoint___ Likes to make things with his/her hands___ Likes to make things with his/her hands___ Has good tactile ability___ Has good tactile ability___ Enjoys arts and crafts like origami, collage, and/or paper___ Enjoys arts and crafts like origami, collage, and/or papermachémaché___ Enjoys woodworking, carpentry, carving, and/or metal___ Enjoys woodworking, carpentry, carving, and/or metalworkwork____Has good eye-hand coordination____Has good eye-hand coordinationNature StrengthsNature Strengths___ Has good rapport with animals___ Has good rapport with animals___ Is good at taking care of plants in the classroom or at home___ Is good at taking care of plants in the classroom or at home___ Is sensitive to weather patterns___ Is sensitive to weather patterns___ Takes care of a pet at home or at school___ Takes care of a pet at home or at school___ Is concerned about the welfare of the planet (e.g. is___ Is concerned about the welfare of the planet (e.g. isecologically-minded)ecologically-minded)___ Likes to go hiking and/or camping in nature___ Likes to go hiking and/or camping in nature___ Enjoys studying nature (e.g. insects, plants, birds, rocks,___ Enjoys studying nature (e.g. insects, plants, birds, rocks,and/or animals)and/or animals)___ Likes to hunt or fish___ Likes to hunt or fish___ Has a good sense of direction___ Has a good sense of directionMusical StrengthsMusical Strengths___ Is sensitive to the rhythms of music___ Is sensitive to the rhythms of music___ Enjoys playing a musical instrument___ Enjoys playing a musical instrument___ Knows the music and lyrics of many songs___ Knows the music and lyrics of many songs___ Has a particular interest in one or more musical___ Has a particular interest in one or more musicalgenres (e.g. rock, classical, jazz)genres (e.g. rock, classical, jazz)___ Enjoys listening to music___ Enjoys listening to music___ Has a good sense of hearing auditory acuity___ Has a good sense of hearing auditory acuity___ Has a good sense of pitch___ Has a good sense of pitch___ Has a good singing voice___ Has a good singing voice___ Makes up his/her own tunes or melodies with or___ Makes up his/her own tunes or melodies with orwithout/lyricswithout/lyricsHigh Tech StrengthsHigh Tech Strengths___ Likes to spend time using a computer, tablet, or smart___ Likes to spend time using a computer, tablet, or smartphonephone___ Has a facility for playing video games___ Has a facility for playing video games___ Likes to surf the Internet___ Likes to surf the Internet___ Knows how to set up audio-visual or computer equipment___ Knows how to set up audio-visual or computer equipment___ Likes to text on the phone___ Likes to text on the phone___ Enjoys social networking (e.g. blog, website, Facebook)___ Enjoys social networking (e.g. blog, website, Facebook)___ Enjoys using a still camera or video camera to record___ Enjoys using a still camera or video camera to recordevents or express him/herselfevents or express him/herself___ Has several his/her own favorite movies or TV shows that___ Has several his/her own favorite movies or TV shows thathe/she likes to talk abouthe/she likes to talk about____Understands at least one computer language____Understands at least one computer languageFrom: Thomas Armstrong, Neurodiversity in the Classroom: Strength-Based Strategies to HelpStudents with Special Needs Succeed in School and Life. Alexandria, VA: ASCD, 2012."Reproduced with permission. Learn more about ASCD at www.ascd.org."
  • Neurodiversity Strengths ChecklistNeurodiversity Strengths ChecklistCreative StrengthsCreative Strengths___ Expresses him/herself dramatically___ Expresses him/herself dramatically___ Has a good imagination___ Has a good imagination___ Enjoys doodling, drawing, and/or painting___ Enjoys doodling, drawing, and/or painting___ Likes to act in plays and skits___ Likes to act in plays and skits___ Works well with clay or other forms of sculpture___ Works well with clay or other forms of sculpture___ Demonstrates creativity in one or more school assignments___ Demonstrates creativity in one or more school assignments___ Possesses a love of beautiful things___ Possesses a love of beautiful things___ Has ideas for futuristic or fantastic projects___ Has ideas for futuristic or fantastic projects___ Comes up with ideas that nobody else has thought of___ Comes up with ideas that nobody else has thought ofSpiritual StrengthsSpiritual Strengths___ Enjoys meditation, yoga, or some other form of___ Enjoys meditation, yoga, or some other form ofcontemplationcontemplation___ Asks big life questions (e.g. what is the purpose of___ Asks big life questions (e.g. what is the purpose oflife?)life?)___ Has a deep sense of wisdom___ Has a deep sense of wisdom___ Participates in religious or other spiritual events___ Participates in religious or other spiritual events___ Has a philosophical attitude toward life___ Has a philosophical attitude toward life___ Has a strong faith in something higher than___ Has a strong faith in something higher thanhim/herselfhim/herselfMiscellaneous StrengthsMiscellaneous Strengths___ Likes collecting things (e.g. stamps, coins, buttons)___ Likes collecting things (e.g. stamps, coins, buttons)___ Loves to cook___ Loves to cook___ Has a love of learning new things___ Has a love of learning new things___ Is a good test taker___ Is a good test taker___ Possesses a good memory for nighttime dreams___ Possesses a good memory for nighttime dreams___ Is curious about the world around him/her___ Is curious about the world around him/her___ Has a good sense of time___ Has a good sense of time___ Manages money well___ Manages money well___ Has good fashion sense in the clothes he/she wears___ Has good fashion sense in the clothes he/she wears___ Has good entrepreneurial skills (e.g. has started own___ Has good entrepreneurial skills (e.g. has started ownbusiness) started his/her own businessbusiness) started his/her own businessOther StrengthsOther Strengths (write in other strengths not mentioned(write in other strengths not mentionedelsewhere in checklist):elsewhere in checklist):From: Thomas Armstrong, Neurodiversity in the Classroom: Strength-Based Strategies to HelpStudents with Special Needs Succeed in School and Life. Alexandria, VA: ASCD, 2012."Reproduced with permission. Learn more about ASCD at www.ascd.org."
  • Positive Niche ConstructionPositive Niche Construction Strength AwarenessStrength Awareness Positive Role ModelsPositive Role Models Assistive Technologies/UDLAssistive Technologies/UDL Strength-Based Learning StrategiesStrength-Based Learning Strategies Enhanced Human Resource NetworkEnhanced Human Resource Network Affirmative Career AspirationsAffirmative Career Aspirations Positive Environmental ModificationsPositive Environmental Modifications
  • Boyle’s Law - 8 WaysBoyle’s Law - 8 Ways LinguisticLinguistic - verbal definition- verbal definition
  • Boyle’s LawBoyle’s LawFor a fixed mass and temperature ofgas, the pressure is inverselyproportional to the volume.
  • Boyle’s Law - 8 WaysBoyle’s Law - 8 Ways LinguisticLinguistic - verbal definition- verbal definition• Logical-MathematicalLogical-Mathematical - equation- equation
  • Boyle’s LawBoyle’s LawP x V = K4ATM x 2cm³ = __2ATM x __ = 88ATM x __ = 81cm³84cm³
  • Boyle’s Law - 8 WaysBoyle’s Law - 8 Ways LinguisticLinguistic - verbal definition- verbal definition Logical-MathematicalLogical-Mathematical - equation- equation• SpatialSpatial – visual metaphor– visual metaphor
  • Boyle’s LawBoyle’s Law
  • Boyle’s Law - 8 WaysBoyle’s Law - 8 Ways LinguisticLinguistic - verbal definition- verbal definition Logical-MathematicalLogical-Mathematical - equation- equation SpatialSpatial - visual metaphor- visual metaphor Bodily-KinestheticBodily-Kinesthetic - mouth experiment- mouth experiment MusicalMusical – Boyle’s law chant– Boyle’s law chant
  • Boyle’s Law ChantBoyle’s Law ChantWhen the volume goes downThe pressure goes upThe blood starts to boilAnd a scream erupts“I need more space or I’m going to frown!”The volume goes upAnd the pressure goes down.
  • Boyle’s Law - 8 WaysBoyle’s Law - 8 Ways LinguisticLinguistic - verbal definition- verbal definition Logical-MathematicalLogical-Mathematical - equation- equation SpatialSpatial - visual metaphor- visual metaphor Bodily-KinestheticBodily-Kinesthetic - mouth experiment- mouth experiment MusicalMusical - Boyle’s law chant- Boyle’s law chant InterpersonalInterpersonal – cooperative activity– cooperative activity IntrapersonalIntrapersonal – “think of a time in your life”– “think of a time in your life” NaturalistNaturalist– marine biology– marine biology
  • Boyle’s LawBoyle’s LawFor a fixed mass and temperature ofgas, the pressure is inverselyproportional to the volume.
  • MI Lesson Plan Mind-MapMI Lesson Plan Mind-MapObjectiveLinguistic - How can Iuse the spoken orwritten word?
  • MI Lesson Plan Mind-MapMI Lesson Plan Mind-MapObjectiveLinguistic - How can Iuse the spoken orwritten word?Logical-Mathematical - How can Ibring in numbers, calculations,logic, classifications, or criticalthinking?
  • MI Lesson Plan Mind-MapMI Lesson Plan Mind-MapObjectiveLinguistic - How can Iuse the spoken orwritten word?Logical-Mathematical - How can Ibring in numbers, calculations,logic, classifications, or criticalthinking?Spatial - How can I usevisual aids, visualization,color, art, or metaphor?
  • MI Lesson Plan Mind-MapMI Lesson Plan Mind-MapObjectiveLinguistic - How can Iuse the spoken orwritten word?Logical-Mathematical - How can Ibring in numbers, calculations,logic, classifications, or criticalthinking?Spatial - How can I usevisual aids, visualization,color, art, or metaphor?Musical - How can I bring in music orenvironmental sounds, or set key points ina rhythmic or melodic framework?
  • MI Lesson Plan Mind-MapMI Lesson Plan Mind-MapObjectiveLinguistic - How can Iuse the spoken orwritten word?Logical-Mathematical - How can Ibring in numbers, calculations,logic, classifications, or criticalthinking?Spatial - How can I usevisual aids, visualization,color, art, or metaphor?Musical - How can I bring in music orenvironmental sounds, or set key points ina rhythmic or melodic framework?Bodily-Kinesthetic - How can Iinvolve the whole body or the useof hands-on experiences?
  • MI Lesson Plan Mind-MapMI Lesson Plan Mind-MapObjectiveLinguistic - How can Iuse the spoken orwritten word?Logical-Mathematical - How can Ibring in numbers, calculations,logic, classifications, or criticalthinking?Spatial - How can I usevisual aids, visualization,color, art, or metaphor?Musical - How can I bring in music orenvironmental sounds, or set key points ina rhythmic or melodic framework?Bodily-Kinesthetic - How can Iinvolve the whole body or the useof hands-on experiences?Naturalist - How can I incorporateliving things or systems?
  • MI Lesson Plan Mind-MapMI Lesson Plan Mind-MapObjectiveLinguistic - How can Iuse the spoken orwritten word?Logical-Mathematical - How can Ibring in numbers, calculations,logic, classifications, or criticalthinking?Spatial - How can I usevisual aids, visualization,color, art, or metaphor?Musical - How can I bring in music orenvironmental sounds, or set key points ina rhythmic or melodic framework?Bodily-Kinesthetic - How can Iinvolve the whole body or the useof hands-on experiences?Naturalist - How can I incorporateliving things or systems?Interpersonal - How can I engagestudents in peer sharing, cooperativelearning, or large group simulation?
  • MI Lesson Plan Mind-MapMI Lesson Plan Mind-MapObjectiveLinguistic - How can Iuse the spoken orwritten word?Logical-Mathematical - How can Ibring in numbers, calculations,logic, classifications, or criticalthinking?Spatial - How can I usevisual aids, visualization,color, art, or metaphor?Musical - How can I bring in music orenvironmental sounds, or set key points ina rhythmic or melodic framework?Bodily-Kinesthetic - How can Iinvolve the whole body or the useof hands-on experiences?Naturalist - How can I incorporateliving things or systems?Interpersonal - How can I engagestudents in peer sharing, cooperativelearning, or large group simulation?Intrapersonal - How can I evokepersonal feelings or memories, orgive students choices?
  • SpellingSpellingLinguistic - TraditionalapproachesSpelling
  • • copy ten times• use in a sentence• syllabify it• look it up in the dictionary• take practice tests
  • SpellingSpellingLinguistic - TraditionalapproachesLogical-Mathematical -Digitalizewords (or use code)Spelling
  • Consonants = 1Vowels = 0Foundation = 1001101001
  • A = 1B = 2C = 3etc.Foundation = 6-15-21-14-4-1-20-9-15-14
  • SpellingSpellingLinguistic - TraditionalapproachesLogical-Mathematical -Digitalizewords (or use code)Spatial - Visualize wordsSpelling
  • AXOLOTL
  • SpellingSpellingLinguistic - TraditionalapproachesLogical-Mathematical -Digitalizewords (or use code)Spatial - Visualize wordsMusical - Sing wordsSpelling
  • PHTHALOCYANINE
  • SpellingSpellingLinguistic - TraditionalapproachesLogical-Mathematical -Digitalizewords (or use code)Spatial - Visualize wordsMusical - Sing wordsBodily-Kinesthetic -Stand up onvowels, sit down on consonantsSpelling
  • ONOMATOMANIA
  • SpellingSpellingLinguistic - TraditionalapproachesLogical-Mathematical -Digitalizewords (or use code)Spatial - Visualize wordsMusical - Sing wordsBodily-Kinesthetic -Stand up onvowels, sit down on consonantsNaturalist - Spelling outside (usenaturalist lists)Spelling
  • SpellingSpellingLinguistic - TraditionalapproachesLogical-Mathematical -Digitalizewords (or use code)Spatial - Visualize wordsMusical - Sing wordsBodily-Kinesthetic -Stand up onvowels, sit down on consonantsNaturalist - Spelling outside (usenaturalist lists)Interpersonal - People spellingSpelling
  • Empathy
  • SpellingSpellingLinguistic - TraditionalapproachesLogical-Mathematical -Digitalizewords (or use code)Spatial - Visualize wordsMusical - Sing wordsBodily-Kinesthetic -Stand up onvowels, sit down on consonantsNaturalist - Spelling outside (usenaturalist lists)Interpersonal - People spellingIntrapersonal - Personalizedspelling listsSpelling
  • Learning Centers ActivityLearning Centers Activity Select an MI symbolSelect an MI symbol• Do the activity listed on the sheet.• When you hear five consecutive beats go tothe next center (clockwise)• Go to your seat on ‘’shave and a haircut twobits”’• On the signal (drum beat) go to that MIcenter (bring handouts, pencil or pen).
  • Instructional Objective:To make students aware of thedangers of fast food eating, andthe benefits of eating a healthydiet.
  • MI Lesson Plan Mind-MapMI Lesson Plan Mind-MapWord Smart -Logic Smart -Picture Smart -Music Smart -Body Smart -Nature Smart -People Smart -Self Smart -
  • Group ActivityGroup Activity Select a scribeSelect a scribe• Choose a specific topic• Brainstorm strategies usingmind-map• Be prepared to demonstrate one30-second strategy
  • ResourcesResourcesArmstrong, Thomas. The Power of Neurodiversity: Unleashing the Advantages of Your Differently WiredBrain. Cambridge, MA: DaCapo Lifelong, 2010.Armstrong, Thomas. Neurodiversity in the Classroom: Strength-Based Strategies to Help Students with SpecialNeeds Succeed in School and Life. Alexandria, VA: ASCD, 2012.Armstrong, Thomas. Multiple Intelligences in the Classroom, 3nd Ed.. Alexandria, VA: ASCD, 2009.Armstrong, Thomas. 7 Kinds of Smart: Identifying and Developing Your Many Intelligences: Revised andUpdated with Information on 2 New Kinds of Smart. , New York: Plume, 1999.Armstrong, Thomas. In Their Own Way: Discovering and Encouraging Your Child’s Multiple Intelligences.New York: Tarcher/Putnam-Penguin, 2000.Armstrong, Thomas. The Multiple Intelligences of Reading and Writing: Making the Words Come Alive.Alexandria, VA: ASCD, 2003.Armstrong, Thomas. You’re Smarter Than You Think: A Kids’ Guide to Multiple Intelligences. Minneapolis,MN: Free Spirit, 2003.Campbell, L. and B. Campbell. Multiple Intelligences and Student Achievement: Success Stories from SixSchools. Alexandria, VA: ASCD, 2000.Gardner, Howard. Frames of Mind: The Theory of Multiple Intelligences. New York: Basic Books, 1983.Gardner, Howard.. Intelligence Reframed: Multiple Intelligences for the 21st Century. New York: Basic, 1999.
  • Contact InformationContact Information• Email: thomas@institute4learning.com• Website: www.institute4learning.com• Blog: http://institute4learning.com/blog/• Twitter: @Dr_Armstrong
  • How to Follow Up This PresentationHow to Follow Up This PresentationResearch in the field of staff development suggests that single presentations by themselves do not producesignificance change, but rather that on-going programs serve to keep the ideas alive, provide opportunities forpractice and feedback, and establish an atmosphere of trust and safety necessary for effective transformation ofteaching practices. Consequently, I’d like to suggest three different structures for on-going support of the ideasI’ve “planted” in this presentation1. Curriculum Planning Groups. These groups would consist of 5-10 teachers who would come togetherregularly to plan lessons, units, semester long themes, or other curricular modules based on the theory of multipleintelligences. Teachers could use the brainstorming/mind-mapping techniques used in this presentation as aformat for each meeting. Each teacher could choose to take primary responsibility for at least one intelligence sothat group members could pool their respective expertise in developing teaching strategies that cover all 8intelligences. Each meeting might begin with a sharing of how strategies developed in the previous meetingworked or didn’t work. Group members could help provide feedback and support in revising or developing newcurricular strategies.2. Support Groups. These groups are more generic sources of support for teachers charting new directions intheir teaching approaches as they seek to incorporate the philosophy as well as the specific tools of multipleintelligences theory. A suggested format for each group meeting might go as follows:a. Success Sharing: The first five minutes of the meeting, participants share something positivethat happened to them in their teaching since the previous support group.
  • b. Negotiating for Time: Participants then tell the group what they would likeindividual help with and how much time they need from the group (e.g. “I need ten minutes for somefeedback on bodily-kinesthetic and musical strategies for teaching regrouping in subtraction” or “Ineed fifteen minutes just to let off a little steam about a parent’s criticism of MI theory”). Timeamounts may need to be adjusted so that everyone has an opportunity to have their needs met. Thenthe main part of the meeting involves each of these individuals getting help in the areas they havespecified.c. Networking and Resource Sharing: The last part of every meeting can be aninformal “party-like” atmosphere (with refreshments etc.) where participants network and shareteaching materials they’ve found effective.3. Study Groups. These groups are structured around my book Multiple Intelligences in theClassroom. Before each meeting, participants read a chapter in the book and do one or more of thesuggested activities at the end of the chapter. They then come together to discuss the material in thechapter and to share the results of the activities. Another way of doing this would involveparticipants talking about the material in the chapter at one meeting, and then at the next meetingsharing experiences suggested at the end of the chapter. Study groups provide an opportunity forteachers to talk about MI theory and connect it to their own classroom experience in a safe andpositive small group atmosphere.Follow-Up (page 2):
  • Leonardo da Vinci’s IEP Meeting
  • Principal: ”Okay, I think we’re ready to start. Whowants to get the ball rolling?”‘
  • School Psychologist: ”Well, I ran him through sometests, but his attention was all over the place. He keptlooking at a part of the wall in my office where theplaster had fallen off, and said he saw a battleshipfighting a dragon. I’m wondering whether he needs aworkup by a psychiatrist to rule out possible psychoticfeatures.”
  • Learning Disability Specialist: “I’m concerned thathe occasionally writes backwards. As you know,this is a soft sign for neurological dysfunction.”
  • Classroom Teacher: “Yes, I’ve seen those reversalsin my classroom. He never seems to get any workdone. He’ll start one thing and then lose interest.He’s always doodling in the margins of theworksheets I give him. And when he’s not doingthat, he’s looking out the window daydreaming.”
  • Learning Disability Specialist: ”I’ve noticed that inmy remediation sessions with him. He appears tobe a good candidate for psycho-stimulantmedication.”
  • Classroom Teacher: ”Yes! That would help me SOMUCH! Last week, we found him in the boilerroom with a screw driver. He said he had a greatidea about how to improve the heating ductsystem in the school. We had to put him on
  • Learning Disability Specialist: ”He’s falling waybehind in reading and most of his other academicsubjects, although, his math and science aren’t toobad. I recommend that we take him out of his artclass for more one-on-one remediation to focus onhis spelling, handwriting, and phonemic awarenessskills.”
  • Principal: “That sounds like a great idea. And canyou set up some workable instructional objectives?I’m concerned that with the Common CoreStandards just around the corner he’s going to belost. And then what’s going to happen to him? Imean, he can’t exactly make a living by doodling,now, can he?”
  • I’m not so sure about that!
  • Thank you!