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Read 4534 Feb. 9, 2010
Read 4534 Feb. 9, 2010
Read 4534 Feb. 9, 2010
Read 4534 Feb. 9, 2010
Read 4534 Feb. 9, 2010
Read 4534 Feb. 9, 2010
Read 4534 Feb. 9, 2010
Read 4534 Feb. 9, 2010
Read 4534 Feb. 9, 2010
Read 4534 Feb. 9, 2010
Read 4534 Feb. 9, 2010
Read 4534 Feb. 9, 2010
Read 4534 Feb. 9, 2010
Read 4534 Feb. 9, 2010
Read 4534 Feb. 9, 2010
Read 4534 Feb. 9, 2010
Read 4534 Feb. 9, 2010
Read 4534 Feb. 9, 2010
Read 4534 Feb. 9, 2010
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Read 4534 Feb. 9, 2010

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READ 4534 Feb 9, 2010 word study, in-text citations

READ 4534 Feb 9, 2010 word study, in-text citations

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  • 1. READ 4534-001<br />Dr. Elizabeth Swaggerty<br />February 9, 2010<br />
  • 2. REVIEW<br />In2Books/ePals<br />Cite, site, sight<br />Plurals and possessives<br />Its vs It’s<br />Walker-Dalhouse, D., & Risko, V. J. (2008). Homelessness, poverty, and children&apos;s literacy development. The Reading Teacher, 62(1), 84–86. doi: 10.1598/RT.62.1.1<br />Podcast: Beating the Odds, Book by Book<br />Read alouds: Neil Gaiman’sWolves in the Walls and The Day I Swapped my Dad for Two Goldfish and Woolvs in the Sitteeby Margaret Wild<br />
  • 3. Announcements<br />No Class Meeting on Feb. 16th<br />Topic and Rationale paper due Feb 16th<br />Mary Lois Staton Reading/Language Arts Conference: Feb. 16th<br />Scholastic Book Orders … placed orders last Thursday. <br />
  • 4. Topic Selection and Rationale Paper<br />Include the following 2 components:<br />I. Topic and Rationale<br /> In a paragraph, identify and explain the topic (related to literacy instruction) you would like to research. Explain why knowledge of this topic is important to your future as a literacy educator. <br /> Some possible topics might include (a) reading comprehension (this topic will need to be narrowed down; for example, online reading comprehension, the comprehension process, comprehension strategies, etc.), (b) reading motivation and engagement, (c) the role of sociocultural theory in constructing knowledge about texts, (d) digital literacies, (e) vocabulary/decoding/word study. In addition to this topic choice, keep in mind that you may further restrict your search to a certain level (primary, intermediate, middle school, strugglers, etc.), gender (girls, boys), or format (guided reading, shared reading, read aloud, etc).<br />II. Possible References<br /> Do an initial search of the available literature. Include 2-5 reference citations (in APA style) from a peer-reviewed journal that seem (upon initial review) to match with your topic choice. <br />
  • 5. Writing Mini-Lesson<br />In-text citations …<br />Smith (2007) and Henry (2004) suggest that teachers should explicitly teach comprehension strategies.<br />Many experts in the field advocate the use of graphic organizers when teaching narrative story structure (Jones & Smith, 2007; Henry, 2003; Swaggerty & Caron, 2006).<br />Pikulski and Chard (2005) found that if a reader can utilize one comprehension strategy well, then comprehension will be improved; but if a reader can successfully utilize a host of strategies, there will be a substantial increase in reading comprehension.<br />However, Anderson, Mason and Shirey (1984) found unequivocal evidence that third grade reading lessons with an emphasis on meaning produced better recall than lessons with an emphasis on accurate oral reading. <br />Although literacy coaching is increasingly gaining interest, little research has been conducted on the topic and the professional literature that is available reveals inconsistency in the roles of literacy coaches (Walpole & Blamey, 2008). <br />
  • 6. Williams, C., Phillips-Birdsong, C., Hufnagel, K., Hungler, D., & Lundstrom, R. P. (2009). Word study instruction in the K–2 classroom. The Reading Teacher, 62(7), 570–578. doi: 10.1598/RT.62.7.3 <br />Mellon, E. (2009). Schools take a new direction on spelling, but some parents balk at eliminating traditional quizzes. Houston Chronicle.http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/moms/6786453.html<br />Where is the purpose statement in the Word Study article?<br />
  • 7. Turn and Talk<br />What did you think of these two pieces?<br />How did you connect to them?<br />What questions do you have?<br />
  • 8. Word Study: Words Their Way<br />Orthographic knowledge: spelling<br />
  • 9. Based on INVENTED SPELLING<br />Charles Read and Carol Chomsky analyzed children’s invented spelling and found that they were not random guesses but showed how children develop word knowledge.<br />Teachers can use students’ invented spellings as a guide to provide instruction in phonics, spelling and vocabulary.<br />
  • 10. Based on patterns and generalizations<br />Short words have patterns with onsets and rimes and longer words (polysyllabic words) often have patterns in terms of morphemes (prefixes, suffixes, and roots).<br />
  • 11. Stages of development<br />Emergent Spelling<br />Pre-K to middle of grade 1<br />Letter Name-Alphabetic Spelling<br />K to middle of grade 2<br />Within Word Pattern Spelling<br />Grade 1 to middle of grade 4<br />Syllables and Affixes Spelling<br />Grade 3 to grade 8<br />Derivational Relations Spelling<br />Grade 5 to grade 12<br />
  • 12. Begin with ASSESSMENT<br />Effective teaching can’t begin until you know what your students already know about words and what they are ready to learn.<br />Spelling inventories<br />
  • 13. Spelling Inventory for Individual Student<br />
  • 14. Spelling Inventory Classroom Composite<br />
  • 15. Explicit Instruction: SORTS<br />Categorize, compare, contrast, analyze to form generalizations that can be applied to new words encountered in reading.<br />Hands-on; manipulative; fun; require thinking<br />Sort by sound, pattern, or meaning<br />Picture Sorts, Word Sorts<br />
  • 16. Picture Sort: Based on Sound<br /><ul><li>Sort by beginning sounds: /f/ and /b/</li></li></ul><li>Word Sort:<br />-able, -ible (derivational relations stage)<br />Go over words, reading each one aloud<br />Are there any sound clues which tell you how to spell the last syllable?<br />Sort the words by the endings to see if you can discover any principle at work.<br />Underline each base word or root word. What do you notice?<br />Generalization: <br />Words that end with –able have a base word that stands by itself and is a word. Words that end with –ible have a root that will not stand alone.<br />Oddball: flexible.<br />Based on what you now know, how would you spell …<br />Tie it to authentic reading (read aloud, guided reading, etc.)<br />The Incredible Book Eating Boy<br />Miss Smith’s Incredible Storybook<br />Owen & Mzee: The True Story of a Remarkable Friendship <br />Invincible series by Robert Kirkman (superheroes)<br />Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day by Judith Viorst<br />Horrible Harry books by Suzy Kline<br />Twelve Terrible Things by Marty Kelly<br />
  • 17. Read Aloud<br />DO NOT OPEN THIS BOOK! By Michaela Muntean and Pascal Lemaitre<br />The Monster at the End of This Book or Please Do Not Open This Book! By Jon Stone<br />That Rabbit Belongs to Emily Brown by Cressida Cowell and Neal Layton<br />
  • 18. By next Tuesday, Feb. 16th<br />Submit topic selection and rationale paper.<br />

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