Read 3204 Feb. 18, 2010
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Read 3204 Feb. 18, 2010

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READ 3204 Feb. 18, 2010

READ 3204 Feb. 18, 2010

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  • Consider what the text says. Consider what the illustration shows. Then make inferences based on text, illustrations, AND your own background knowledge and experience.
  • Consider what the text says. Consider what the illustration shows. Then make inferences based on text, illustrations, AND your own background knowledge and experience.
  • There are no illustrations here. Use the text and your background knowledge to infer what the author might be implying here.
  • There is no text to consider here. Consider what the illustration shows. Then make inferences based on the illustrations and your own background knowledge and experience.

Read 3204 Feb. 18, 2010 Read 3204 Feb. 18, 2010 Presentation Transcript

  • Fundamentals of Reading Instruction
    Thursday, February 18, 2010
    READ 3204
  • Announcements
    How is the LSS project with Voice Thread going?
    Mary Lois Staton Conference: How was it? Submit your paper within one week of attendance
    Tar River Reading Council Meeting: Feb. 18th4:30 @ St. Timothy’s Episcopal Church
    Scholastic Book Order - New brochures (Due date?)
    February 23rd– Group 1 LSS Due
    February 25th– Second literature circle meeting (complete role sheet with two discussion questions on the back AND response activity)
    Practicum Placements are Available:
    By Thursday, March 4th, submit a “Practicum Interview Protocol and Plan,” including your assigned school and teacher, an interview protocol (at least 4 interview questions about his/her beliefs about reading, how s/he teaches reading in her classroom, and what materials s/he typically uses when providing reading instruction), and the date(s)/time(s) you have arranged to complete your practicum experience.
    VOTE? http://www.sandboxthreads.com/design-voting.html
  • Review
    Debrief: Literature Circles for Listen to the Wind
    Open-ended questions vs. explicit questions
    Think Alouds: Model your thinking about text
    Comprehension strategy instruction: trash
  • Examine the evidence in order to make inferences about my mystery neighbors. Remember that each inference you make must be directly supported by evidence!
    Inferring Stems:
    My guess is …
    Maybe …
    Perhaps …
    It could be that …
    This could mean …
    I predict …
    I infer …
  • Next, make the connection to the kids’ reading.
    Remember to be explicit and model.
    “You can use inferring when you read stories to help you understand what the author is suggesting.”
    Authors imply and readers infer.
    Looking carefully at the illustrations in picture books and combining them with words from the text, you can make inferences that can help you better comprehend the text.
  • Model: Read AloudThe Three Pigs by David Wiesner
    It is a good idea to begin with book covers when modeling inferring.
    Record Inferences:
    Quote or picture from text/Inference
    When a student makes an inference, ask,
    “How do you know?”
    “Did the author tell you that?” or
    “Does the text say that?”
    Encourage connections between the inference and evidence in the text.
    Remember that when you make an inference you use your background knowledge/schema and the text to construct main idea, predict, hypothesize.
    Inferring Stems:
    My guess is …
    Maybe …
    Perhaps …
    It could be that …
    This could mean …
    I predict …
    I infer …
  • Independent Practice
    Gradually release control and let students try it on their own with text.
    Use examples of text that are on their independent level (easy)
  • Comics
  • Comics
  • He put down $20.00 at the window. The woman behind the window gave him $4.00. The next person gave him $8.00, but he gave it back to her. So, when they went inside, she bought him a large popcorn.
  • Wordless Picture Books
    The Red Book
    By Barbara Lehman
    2004
  • Keep practicing!
    Provide lots of opportunities over time for kids to see you make inferences with various texts and for kids to try to make inferences with various types of texts.
  • REVIEW
    Comprehension Strategy instruction
    *Gradual release of support: provide lots of support initially, followed by more student independence.*
    1. Introduction of strategy
    2. Teacher demonstration of thinking
    3. Strategy-in-use with text all kids can understand
    4. Independent practice with text at kids’ independent level
    5. Application of the strategy repeatedly across a number of different texts.
  • Determine Roles for Lit. Circle Meeting #2
    Henry and the Kite Dragon
    Danielle Cooper
    Kristin Gates
    Emily Hinrichs
    Kristy Morton
    Katherine Stewart
    Jessica Bullock
    Wangari’s Trees of Peace: A True Story from Africa
    Kelly Derby
    Nic Orrison
    Faith Sutton
    Kathryn Allen
    Elaina Essey
    Katie McMahon
    One Hen - How One Small Loan Made a Big Difference
    Leigh Anna Tyson
    Mary Shiflet
    Nicole Craig
    Mary Sweeney
    Lindsey Faithful
    Cortnee Bullock
    Give a Goat
    Katlin Cartwright
    Nikki Tozzi
    Taffy Repass-Jones
    Rebecca Harrell
    Morgan Heine
    Lindsay Chapman
    The Wall: Growing up Behind the Iron Curtain
    Abby Fare
    Lauren Seeman
    Shannon Leonard
    Andrea Wooten
    Georgia Shafer
  • Ticket Out the Door
    Write down at least one of the following:
    A personal connection to the article – be specific
    A text-to-text connection to the article (another article or textbook) – be specific
    An important passage of the article – tell why
  • For Tuesday …
    Group 1 LSS due
  • Read Aloud
    Science
    Oscar and the Frogby Geoff Waring
    A Seed is Sleepy by Dianna Hutts Aston and Sylvia Long
    Actual Size by Steve Jenkins