Bonfire Health Corporate Wellness Seminars
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  • In this slide we demonstrate the effects of co-morbid illnesses with hypertension, arthritis, asthma and ulcers. The average number of days in a month in which an individual reports missing or cutting back on work is the measure of role impairment. It is clear that the presence of co-morbid mental illnesses dramatically decreases work productivity relative to the effects of other chronic illnesses alone. Kessler et al (2003) conclude that…”All 4 physical disorders were associated with significant role impairments in bivariate analyses. However, further analysis showed that these impairments were almost entirely confined to cases with co-morbid mental disorders. In this slide we demonstrate the effects of co-morbid illnesses with hypertension, arthritis, asthma and ulcers. The average number of days in a month in which an individual reports missing or cutting back on work is the measure of role impairment. It is clear that the presence of co-morbid mental illnesses dramatically decreases work productivity relative to the effects of other chronic illnesses alone. Kessler et al (2003) conclude that…”All 4 physical disorders were associated with significant role impairments in bivariate analyses. However, further analysis showed that these impairments were almost entirely confined to cases with co-morbid mental disorders.

Bonfire Health Corporate Wellness Seminars Bonfire Health Corporate Wellness Seminars Presentation Transcript

  • Bonfire Health Wellness Foundations
  • IGNITE YOUR HEALTH“The United States is experiencing an unsustainabledisease burden – 130 million people today suffer fromchronic illnesses. We spend over $2 trillion a year – about16 percent of our gross domestic product – on healthcare. The vast majority of our health care dollars are spenttreating chronic disease.” Dr. Richard H. Carmona, MD 17th Surgeon General of the United States Almanac of Chronic Disease, 2008 Edition
  • If left unchecked, chronic diseases will cost our economy over $4.1 trillion by the year 2023… Projected costs associated with seven of the most common chronic diseases* $4,500 $4,000 Lost Economic Output $3,500 Treatment Expenditures $3,000 $2,500 $2,000 $1,500 $1,000 $500 $0 09 12 21 03 06 15 18 20 20 20 20 20 20 20*This study evaluated the burden of seven of the most common chronic diseases/conditions (cancer, diabetes, heart disease, hypertension,mental disorders, pulmonary conditions, and stroke. Source: DeVol, R, Bedroussian, A, et al. An Unhealthy America: The Economic Burden of Chronic Disease. The Milken Institute. October 2007. Full report and methodology available at: www.chronicdiseaseimpact.com. 3
  • …And could cost the U.S. almost $6 trillion in lost economic output by 2050 Projected lost economic output associated with seven of the most common chronic diseases* 6 5 4 $US Trillions 3 2 1 0 05 15 20 25 30 35 40 10 45 50 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20*This study evaluated the burden of seven of the most common chronic diseases/conditions (cancer, diabetes, heart disease, hypertension,mental disorders, pulmonary conditions, and stroke. Source: DeVol, R, Bedroussian, A, et al. An Unhealthy America: The Economic Burden of Chronic Disease. The Milken Institute. October 2007. Full report and methodology available at: www.chronicdiseaseimpact.com. 4
  • Workplace health promotion programs have been shown to reduce health care costs, increase productivity and reduce absenteeism Average percent change in employers’ costs resulting from workplace health promotion and wellness programs Workers’ comp./ disability Health management Absenteeism costs claims costs -25 -26 Average Change -27 -27% -28 -28% -29 -30 -30% -31Source: Chapman, L. (2003). Meta-evaluation of Worksite Health Promotion Economic Return Studies. Art of Health Promotion Newsletter, 6(6). 5Taken from: American Hospital Association. Trendwatch. Summer 2007. Accessed at: http://www.aha.org/aha/trendwatch/2007/twoct2007health.ppt
  • Wellness Foundations Series
  • IGNITE YOUR HEALTHWellness Series Objectives•Information that empowers, inspires and equips•Environment that promotes and rewards healthier choices•Resources that make it easier to make healthier choices•Community that supports a healthier lifestyle•Specific team interests like weight-loss and stress reduction
  • IGNITE YOUR HEALTHBonfire Health Wellness Foundations Program• Bonfire Wellness Foundations: $1200 (Single event 45 – 90 mins) Recorded / DVD produced and provided for company lending library• Complete Series: $3900 (Four events 60 - 90 mins) Bonfire Wellness Foundations Seminar Bonfire FUEL (how well people EAT) Bonfire AIR (how well people MOVE) Bonfire SPARK (how well people THINK) Recorded / DVD produced and provided for company lending library
  • IGNITE YOUR HEALTH“Overwhelming evidence from a variety of sources, includingepidemiological, prospective cohort, and intervention studies,links most chronic diseases seen in the world today tophysical inactivity and inappropriate diet consumption.” Roberts CK, et al. Effects of exercise & diet on chronic disease. Journal Applied Physiology 2005; 98: 3-30 “You don’t GET sick… You DO sick.”
  • Chapter One: The Human Cost TodayIntroduction: Chronic diseases are a significant problem in the United States, accounting for many of the most prevalent and costly illnesses that affect Americans. More than 133 million Americans, or 45 percent of the population, have at least one chronic condition. These conditions include arthritis, asthma, cancer, cardiovascular (heart) disease, depression and diabetes, though these are only a few of many chronic illnesses that negatively impact the lives of Americans. Many chronic diseases are caused or exacerbated by poor nutrition, lack of exercise, smoking and other lifestyle choices. As a result of these factors, as well as a lack of emphasis on preventive care, incidence rates of chronic disease have increased substantially over the last two decades. Risk factors like obesity are also on the rise. Since 1980, obesity rates have increased 250 percent, now affecting 71 million Americans. This has tremendous implications for future generations; for example, it is predicted that 1 in 3 children born in 2000 will develop diabetes over the course of their lives, given current trends in overweight and obesity. Not surprisingly, chronic diseases have become the leading cause of death and disability in the United States. Seven out of every 10 deaths are attributable to chronic disease, and illnesses like heart disease and cancer top the list of most common causes of death. Minority populations are often disproportionately impacted by chronic disease, with African Americans and Hispanics often 1.5 to 2 times more likely to have a certain condition than their white counterparts. 10
  • States in the South and New England have the highest rates of chronic diseases* Top Quartile Second Third Bottom Quartile States in the top quartile have the lowest rates of seven common chronic diseases*This study evaluated the burden of seven of the most common chronic diseases/conditions (cancer, diabetes, heart disease, hypertension,mental disorders, pulmonary conditions, and stroke.Source: DeVol, R, Bedroussian, A, et al. An Unhealthy America: The Economic Burden of Chronic Disease. The Milken Institute. October 2007.Full report and methodology available at: www.chronicdiseaseimpact.com. 11
  • Chapter Two: The Economic Cost TodayIntroduction Chronic diseases are at the root of a significant portion of rising health care costs. About two-thirds of the rise in health care spending over the last two decades is due to the rise in treated rates of chronic disease. In addition, the vast majority of current spending is for treatment of Americans with one or more chronic conditions. Indeed, more than 75 percent of the approximately $2 trillion Americans spend each year on health care is spent on chronic diseases, and public health programs like Medicare and Medicaid are seeing sizable portions of their budget devoted to treatment of chronic diseases and complications from those conditions. But direct health care costs represent only a quarter of the total cost of chronic diseases. Indirect costs such as absenteeism and presenteeism* cost businesses – and our economy -- $1 trillion a year. Every year, millions of work days are missed because employees are suffering themselves from a chronic disease, or they have to care for a loved one who is ill. *Presenteeism is defined as lost productivity that occurs when employees come to work but perform below par due to any kind of illness. 12
  • Three in four dollars spent on health care in the U.S. are for patients with one or more chronic conditions Total U.S. health spending in 2006 = $2.1 trillion 25% Health care costs associated with patients with one or 75% more chronic diseases = ~$1.58 trillionSource: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Chronic Disease Overview page. Available at:http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/overview.htm. Accessed April 6, 2007. 13
  • Within public health problems, patients with chronic diseases represent an even higher percentage of spending More than 96 cents of every dollar …and 83 cents of every dollar spent in Medicare… spent in Medicaid Share spent on patients with chronic diseasesSource: Partnership for Solutions. Chronic Conditions: Making the Case for Ongoing Care. September 2004 Update. Available at:http://www.rwjf.org/files/research/Chronic%20Conditions%20Chartbook%209-2004.ppt. Accessed on April 17, 2007. 14
  • Increases in the prevalence and treatment intensity of chronic disease are responsible for about two-thirds of the increase in health care costs over the past two decades $700 Level of health spending among the noninstitutionalized U.S. population, 1987–2000 $627.9 $600 (in billions of nominal dollars) = Increase attributable $500 to rise in prevalence $400 of treated $313.5 ~$211 billion chronic disease $300 $200 $100 $0 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 00 YearsSource: Thorpe K. The Rise In Health Care Spending And What To Do About It. Health Affairs. 2005;6:1436-1445. Also, Thorpe K,Florence CS, Joski P. Which Medical Conditions Account For The Rise In Health Care Spending? 15
  • The doubling of obesity is responsible for about one-third of the rise in health care costs since the mid-1980s Percent of U.S. adults who are obese* 1985 2005 No data <10% 10%-14% No data <10% 10%-14% 15%-19% 20%-24% 25%-29% >30%*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” personSource: Thorpe K, Florence, C, Howard, D, Joski, P. The Impact of Obesity in Rising Medical Spending. Health Affairs. 2004. Also, Centers for DiseaseControl and Prevention. U.S. Obesity Trends 1985-2000. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/obesity/trend.maps 16
  • Health care spending related to chronic diseases is dwarfed by the indirect costs of these health problems Total cost burden in 2003 for seven common chronic diseases* Direct costs represent about a fifth of the total cost burden of $277 billion chronic diseases 21% Indirect costs amount to four- fifths of the total $1.0 trillion burden 79% Direct costs = Health care costs associated with treatment of chronic disease Indirect costs = Productivity losses such as absenteeism and presenteeism associated with people with chronic diseases*This study evaluated the burden of seven of the most common chronic diseases/conditions (cancer, diabetes, heart disease, hypertension,mental disorders, pulmonary conditions, and stroke.Source: DeVol, R, Bedroussian, A, et al. An Unhealthy America: The Economic Burden of Chronic Disease. The Milken Institute. October 2007.Full report and methodology available at: www.chronicdiseaseimpact.com. 17
  • Cancer and hypertension are among the most costly chronic conditions, accounting for over $500 billion annually in treatment expenditures and lost economic output Treatment expenditures and lost economic output (in billions) per chronic condition* Stroke $22 Diabetes $27 $105 Pulmonary Conditions $45 $94 Heart Disease $65 $105 Mental Disorders $46 $171 Hypertension $33 $280 Cancers $48 $271 $0 $50 $100 $150 $200 $250 $300 $350 $400 Treatment Expenditures Lost Economic Output*This study evaluated the burden of seven of the most common chronic diseases/conditions (cancer, diabetes, heart disease, hypertension,mental disorders, pulmonary conditions, and stroke.Source: DeVol, R, Bedroussian, A, et al. An Unhealthy America: The Economic Burden of Chronic Disease. The Milken Institute. October 2007.Full report and methodology available at: www.chronicdiseaseimpact.com. 18
  • Presenteeism is responsible for the largest share of lost economic output associated with chronic health problems Cost of chronic diseases by category, 2003 Total = Lost Workdays Presenteeism is Individual, ~$1 trillion $127 billion defined as lost productivity that Presenteesism Caregiver, occurs when $80 billion employees come to work but perform below par Lost Workdays due to any kind of Presenteesism Caregiver, illness. Individual, $11 billion $828 billion*This study evaluated the burden of seven of the most common chronic diseases/conditions (cancer, diabetes, heart disease, hypertension,mental disorders, pulmonary conditions, and stroke.Source: DeVol, R, Bedroussian, A, et al. An Unhealthy America: The Economic Burden of Chronic Disease. The Milken Institute. October 2007.Full report and methodology available at: www.chronicdiseaseimpact.com. 19
  • When it comes to presenteeism, arthritis, hypertension, and depression are among the most costly conditions Estimated average annual cost of presenteeism per employee with condition $300 Cost per Employee with Condition $252 $247 $246 $222 $200 $189 $159 $100 $76 $72 $71 $33 $0 Arthritis A rth riti s Hypertension H y e rte n sio n M ig ra in /H e a d a c h e p Depression/ D e p re ssio n /S a d n e ss/Me n ta l Illn e ss Allergy A lle rg y Migraine/ M ig ra in e /H e a d a c h e Diabetes D ia b e te s Any A n yC a n c e r Asthma A sth ma Heart H e a rt D i se a se Respiratory R e sp ira to ry D i so rd e rs Sadness/ Headache Cancer Disease Disorders Mental IllnessSource: Goetzel, R.Z., et al. (2004). Health, Absence, Disability, and Presenteeism Cost Estimates of Certain Physical and Mental Health Conditions Affecting U.S.Employers. Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 46(4), 398-412.Taken from: American Hospital Association. Trendwatch. Summer 2007. Accessed at: http://www.aha.org/aha/trendwatch/2007/twoct2007health.ppt 20
  • Depression and stress are the most common causes of absenteeism Number of days absent per affected individual per year due to 10 conditions, 1997-1999 60 50 Days per Year Absent (Low, Average, High) 40 30 25.6 20 16.9 14.7 12.0 10.7 10 8.2 6.8 5.9 2.0 0.9 0 Depression/S Any Respiratory Asthma Migraine/ Allergy Heart Arthritis Diabetes Hypertension adness/ Cancer Disorders Headache Disease Mental IllnessSource: Goetzel, R.Z., et al. (2004). Health, Absence, Disability, and Presenteeism Cost Estimates of Certain Physical and Mental Health Conditions Affecting U.S.Employers. Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 46(4), 398-412. 21Taken from: American Hospital Association. Trendwatch. Summer 2007. Accessed at: http://www.aha.org/aha/trendwatch/2007/twoct2007health.ppt
  • … And mental illnesses, when comorbid* with other chronic diseases, significantly decrease work productivity Number of 30-day role impairment days associated with pure and comorbid* chronic illnesses 4 (Role impairment = sickness absence days plus work cut-back days) Average Number of Impaired Days per 3 Month 2 1 0 Hypertension Arthritis Asthma Ulcers Chronic Disease Chronic Disease and Mental Illness *Cormorbidity is the condition of having two or more diseases at the same time.Source: Kessler, RC, Ormel, J, Demler, O, et al. Comorbid Mental Disorders Account for the Role Impairment of Commonly Occurring ChronicPhysical Disorders: Results From the National Comorbidity Survey. Journal of Occupational & Environmental Medicine. 45(12):1257-1266,December 2003. 22
  • Chapter Three: The Cost TomorrowIntroduction: While chronic diseases exact a huge toll on Americans today, the future is even more troubling. Over the next 15 years, the prevalence of chronic conditions in the U.S. is expected to rise dramatically. According to a study by the Milken Institute, there will be 230 million reported cases of chronic disease in 2023, an increase of 42 percent from 2003. Cases of cancer, diabetes and mental disorders are expected to rise most substantially, by 53 to 60 percent per illness. In addition, the number of obese Americans, currently one third of the total population, is also projected to increase. By the year 2015, it is predicted that 75 percent of Americans will be obese, significantly contributing to the rise in chronic illnesses. Indeed, if current U.S. health trends continue, the results could be catastrophic for future generations, the health care system and the economy. Without immediate focus on prevention, the direct and indirect costs of chronic diseases are predicted to grow exponentially. Research has shown that, if left unchecked, chronic conditions will cost the U.S. economy over $4.1 trillion annually in treatment expenditures and lost economic output by the year 2023. Certain diseases, like heart disease and cancers, will be the most costly. 23
  • By the year 2023, the incidence of chronic disease is expected to rise dramatically 100% Projected rise in cases of seven of the most common chronic diseases, 2003-2023* 80% 62 60% 54 53 41 39 40% 31 29 20% 0% rs e es e ns s on k as er e et ro o i rd c ns e it i b St an is o ia e d is tD C rt on D D e r C yp ea l ta y H H en ar on M lm Pu*This study evaluated the burden of seven of the most common chronic diseases/conditions (cancer, diabetes, heart disease, hypertension,mental disorders, pulmonary conditions, and stroke.Source: DeVol, R, Bedroussian, A, et al. An Unhealthy America: The Economic Burden of Chronic Disease. The Milken Institute. October 2007.Full report available at: www.chronicdiseaseimpact.com. Note: Statistics only include data for top seven chronic diseases 24
  • The rate of obesity is also expected to increase, and contribute to rising rates of chronic diseases By 2015, it is predicted that 41 percent of Americans will be obese 100% By 2015 without major changes, researchers predict 75 percent of adults and 24 percent of children will be overweight or obese 80% 60% 41 40% 32 20% 13 0% 1960 2004 2015 YearSource: Wang, Y and Beydoun, M. The Obesity Epidemic in the United States—Gender, Age, Socioeconomic, Racial/Ethnic, and GeographicCharacteristics: A Systematic Review and Meta-Regression Analysis. Epidemiologic Review. 2007 29(1):6-28; doi:10.1093/epirev/mxm007 25
  • If left unchecked, chronic diseases will cost our economy over $4.1 trillion by the year 2023… Projected costs associated with seven of the most common chronic diseases* $4,500 $4,000 Lost Economic Output $3,500 Treatment Expenditures $3,000 $2,500 $2,000 $1,500 $1,000 $500 $0 09 12 21 03 06 15 18 20 20 20 20 20 20 20*This study evaluated the burden of seven of the most common chronic diseases/conditions (cancer, diabetes, heart disease, hypertension,mental disorders, pulmonary conditions, and stroke. Source: DeVol, R, Bedroussian, A, et al. An Unhealthy America: The Economic Burden of Chronic Disease. The Milken Institute. October 2007. Full report and methodology available at: www.chronicdiseaseimpact.com. 26
  • …And could cost the U.S. almost $6 trillion in lost economic output by 2050 Projected lost economic output associated with seven of the most common chronic diseases* 6 5 4 $US Trillions 3 2 1 0 05 15 20 25 30 35 40 10 45 50 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20*This study evaluated the burden of seven of the most common chronic diseases/conditions (cancer, diabetes, heart disease, hypertension,mental disorders, pulmonary conditions, and stroke. Source: DeVol, R, Bedroussian, A, et al. An Unhealthy America: The Economic Burden of Chronic Disease. The Milken Institute. October 2007. Full report and methodology available at: www.chronicdiseaseimpact.com. 27
  • Chapter Four: Opportunity for ImprovementIntroduction: Right now, far too little is being invested in improving Americans’ health and effectively preventing and managing common and costly chronic health problems. In an average year, the U.S. spends less than $10 per person on prevention -- about the same amount of money as a single movie ticket costs in many places in the U.S.! Improvements in personal health behaviors, investment by business and the health care system in population health improvement could save millions of lives, and trillions of dollars. By the year 2023, the U.S. could save over $1 trillion through investing in prevention, mostly by reducing indirect costs of chronic health problems, such as absenteeism and presenteeism. 28
  • But simple changes in behaviors could lead to significant decreases in cases of common and costly chronic diseases The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates up to… 80% of heart 80% of type 2 disease and diabetes 40% of cancer stroke …could be prevented if only Americans were to do three things:  Stop smoking  Start eating healthy  Get in shapeSource: Mensah G. Global and Domestic Health Priorities: Spotlight on Chronic Disease. National Business Group on Health Webinar. May 23, 2006.Available at: http://www.businessgrouphealth.org/opportunities/webinar052306chronicdiseases.pdf. Accessed April 17, 2007. 29
  • Workplace health promotion programs have been shown to reduce health care costs, increase productivity and reduce absenteeism Average percent change in employers’ costs resulting from workplace health promotion and wellness programs Workers’ comp./ disability Health management Absenteeism costs claims costs -25 -26 Average Change -27 -27% -28 -28% -29 -30 -30% -31Source: Chapman, L. (2003). Meta-evaluation of Worksite Health Promotion Economic Return Studies. Art of Health Promotion Newsletter, 6(6). 30Taken from: American Hospital Association. Trendwatch. Summer 2007. Accessed at: http://www.aha.org/aha/trendwatch/2007/twoct2007health.ppt
  • By the year 2023, the U.S. can save over $1 trillion through investing in prevention, mostly in indirect costs* $1,200 Lost economic output (indirect) $1,000 Treatment expenditures (direct) $800 $600 $400 $200 $0 04 06 08 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20*This study evaluated the burden of seven of the most common chronic diseases/conditions (cancer, diabetes, heart disease, hypertension,mental disorders, pulmonary conditions, and stroke. Alternative assumptions on the future path of chronic-disease incidence, prevalence andcost were developed based on best practices in prevention, early detection and new innovations in disease treatment and management. Source: DeVol, R, Bedroussian, A, et al. An Unhealthy America: The Economic Burden of Chronic Disease. The Milken Institute. October 2007. Full report and methodology available at: www.chronicdiseaseimpact.com. 31
  • Investing in prevention will save the U.S. billions of dollars in direct and indirect health costs Costs of chronic disease (in billions) in 2023 due to treatment expenditures and lost economic output Stroke $74 $24 Pulmonary Conditions $310 $73 Diabetes $340 $90 Heart Disease $292 $213 Mental Disorders $587 $116 Hypertension $731 $196 Cancers $696 $410 $0 $400 $800 $1200 Billions Alternate future Costs that could be avoided through preventionSource: DeVol, R, Bedroussian, A, et al. An Unhealthy America: The Economic Burden of Chronic Disease. The Milken Institute. October 2007. 32Full report and methodology available at: www.chronicdiseaseimpact.com.
  • … and that the U.S. should invest more in prevention Four out of five Americans prefer health care dollars to be spent on preventive measures as opposed to treating diseases after the fact. 81 percent of adults interviewed believe the U.S. should prioritize our health care dollars to “invest in preventive measures”Survey by the Partnership to Fight Chronic Disease: Conducted by APCO Insight, April 27-29, 2007 and based on telephone interviews with anational adult sample of 1,001. 33
  • ResourcesPFCD Resources• PFCD Policy Platform: http://www.fightchronicdisease.com/advocate/platform/index.cfm• PFCD “Unhealthy Truth” Presentation: http://www.fightchronicdisease.com/resources/national.cfm• Chronic Care “Chartbook”: http://www.fightchronicdisease.com/crisis/index.cfmPartner Resources• Alliance for Aging Research Silver Book: http://www.silverbook.org/• American Cancer Society Cancer Facts & Figures 2007: http://www.cancer.org/docroot/STT/content/stt_1x_cancer_facts__figures_2007.asp• American Hospital Association Trendwatch Reports: http://www.aha.org/aha_app/trendwatch/archive.jsp• Milken Institute “An Unhealthy America” Report: http://www.chronicdiseaseimpact.com/• Partnership for Prevention 34
  • IGNITE YOUR HEALTHcontact@bonfirehealth.com