Conceptualizing the Role of Sediment in Ecosystem Service Frameworks   Developing a framework for Sediment-Ecosystem Regio...
Ecological risk assessment is the process that evaluates the probability of adverse effects to endpoints as a result of on...
Pathways for  contaminated sediment  impact in a typical EcoRA Conceptual Model All  complete exposure pathways have the p...
Pathways for  contaminated sediment  impact in a typical EcoRA Conceptual Model All  complete exposure pathways have the p...
Sediment as Habitat: Sediment organisms play critical roles in ecosystem functioning Animal burrows pH imaging O 2  imagin...
Sediment balance also essential. Sediment lack affects coastal and land defence... <ul><li>Source: The Benefits of Using D...
...but sediment excess creates other problems, both when deposited... From  Sediment Matters , Atkins Ltd, 2009
The assumptions behind sediment assessment are more complex than those behind contaminant assessment
The assumptions behind sediment assessment are more complex than those behind contaminant assessment  Sediment-Ecosystem R...
A range of river basin objectives are affected by sediment; these can be reflected by  endpoints  or  Service Providing Un...
A range of river basin objectives are affected by sediment; these can be reflected by  endpoints  or  Service Providing Un...
There are a range of ecosystem services affected by sediment; these can be reflected by  endpoints  or  Service Providing ...
Landscape use and  biophysical conditions  define sediment  status ; sediment  role  depends upon  endpoint  under conside...
Landscape use and  biophysical conditions  define sediment  status ; sediment  role  depends upon  endpoint  under conside...
Landscape use and  biophysical conditions  define sediment  status ; sediment  role  depends upon  endpoint  under conside...
Landscape use and  biophysical conditions  define sediment  status ; sediment  role  depends upon  endpoint  under conside...
Landscape use and  biophysical conditions  define sediment  status ; sediment  role  depends upon  endpoint  under conside...
Landscape use and  biophysical conditions  define sediment  status ; sediment  role  depends upon  endpoint  under conside...
Fine-Grained Soil/ Sediment Fisheries Supporting/ Regulating 1 ˚ Production Stabilization/ Habitat maintenance Provisionin...
Fine-Grained Soil/ Sediment Fisheries Supporting/ Regulating 1 ˚ Production Stabilization/ Habitat maintenance Provisionin...
Natural ecosystems provide a “bundle” of services From de Groot et al 2009
The more intensively we manage land to enhance specific services, the more others suffer From de Groot et al 2009
More sustainable mangement seeks to optimise the bundle of services From de Groot et al 2009
Different land use types result in different ecosystem service bundles from Rausdepp-Hearne et al 2010
Different land use types result in different ecosystem service bundles from Rausdepp-Hearne et al 2010  Utilization of eco...
Landscape Biophysical Conditions Landscape Management Soil Status Sediment Status Aquatic Biophysical Conditions Aquatic M...
Landscape Biophysical Conditions Landscape Management Soil Status Sediment Status Aquatic Biophysical Conditions Aquatic M...
Both intrinsic landscape properties and management activities (service use practices) affect sediment  status Agricultural...
Both intrinsic landscape properties and management activities (service use practices) affect sediment  status Agricultural...
Sediment status as a result of land use can be modelled using site-specific or probabilistic conditions *From S E Apitz, S...
The transport/location continuum. In terms of SEcoRA, these are  exposure  factors, and must be addressed
Exposure issues can be modelled Calculation module for evaluating river transport issues* *From S E Apitz, S Casper, A Ang...
We manage the landscape (on land and in water) to optimize chosen ecosystem services... Watershed image from  Natural Reso...
This affects the status of water, soils and sediments at sites and in downstream systems... Watershed image from  Natural ...
Ultimately, this affects the viability and sustainability of a variety of aquatic ecosystem services Watershed image from ...
Watershed image from  Natural Resources Conservation Service   These trade-offs must be assessed and managed in a spatiall...
We have been developing models and tools that allow us to evaluate how management choices from the landscape perspective a...
In future, landscape, aquatic and coastal  management should be considered in terms of maximizing ecosystem services while...
Conclusions <ul><li>Sediment plays complex and varied roles in ecosystem functioning and the provision of ecosystem servic...
For more information... <ul><li>S E Apitz (2011) Conceptualising the role of sediment in sustaining ecosystem services: Se...
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Sediment-Ecosystem Regional Assessment

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Brief description of the SEcoRA concept

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Sediment-Ecosystem Regional Assessment

  1. 1. Conceptualizing the Role of Sediment in Ecosystem Service Frameworks Developing a framework for Sediment-Ecosystem Regional Assessment (SEcoRA) Sabine E. Apitz SEA Environmental Decisions, Ltd. *1 South Cottages, The Ford; Little Hadham, Herts, SG11 2AT, UK; +44 (0)1279 771890; drsea@cvrl.org Transform information into action… ©SEA Environmental Decisions, Ltd, 2011
  2. 2. Ecological risk assessment is the process that evaluates the probability of adverse effects to endpoints as a result of one or multiple stressors from Power, B., Crane, M., Bradford, P., 2008. Guidance on desk studies and conceptual site models in ecological risk assessment. Science Report – SC070009/SR2a. Environment Agency, Bristol, UK, p. 51.
  3. 3. Pathways for contaminated sediment impact in a typical EcoRA Conceptual Model All complete exposure pathways have the potential to cause negative effects
  4. 4. Pathways for contaminated sediment impact in a typical EcoRA Conceptual Model All complete exposure pathways have the potential to cause negative effects Sediment, on the other hand, cannot be treated as a typical stressor – it has both desirable and undesirable roles in ecosystems
  5. 5. Sediment as Habitat: Sediment organisms play critical roles in ecosystem functioning Animal burrows pH imaging O 2 imaging fluorescent SPI O 2 imaging Benthic photosynthsis www.cobo.org.uk 5 mm 5 mm
  6. 6. Sediment balance also essential. Sediment lack affects coastal and land defence... <ul><li>Source: The Benefits of Using Dredged Material in Aquatic Systems, </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Lindsay Murray, Cefas, UK, SedNet, Venice November 2006 </li></ul></ul>From van Baars, 2004
  7. 7. ...but sediment excess creates other problems, both when deposited... From Sediment Matters , Atkins Ltd, 2009
  8. 8. The assumptions behind sediment assessment are more complex than those behind contaminant assessment
  9. 9. The assumptions behind sediment assessment are more complex than those behind contaminant assessment Sediment-Ecosystem Regional Assessment (SEcoRA) Must Address the Complexity of Sediment-Endpoint Interactions
  10. 10. A range of river basin objectives are affected by sediment; these can be reflected by endpoints or Service Providing Units
  11. 11. A range of river basin objectives are affected by sediment; these can be reflected by endpoints or Service Providing Units Biotic Endpoints/ SPUs
  12. 12. There are a range of ecosystem services affected by sediment; these can be reflected by endpoints or Service Providing Units Abiotic Endpoints/ SPUs
  13. 13. Landscape use and biophysical conditions define sediment status ; sediment role depends upon endpoint under consideration
  14. 14. Landscape use and biophysical conditions define sediment status ; sediment role depends upon endpoint under consideration
  15. 15. Landscape use and biophysical conditions define sediment status ; sediment role depends upon endpoint under consideration
  16. 16. Landscape use and biophysical conditions define sediment status ; sediment role depends upon endpoint under consideration
  17. 17. Landscape use and biophysical conditions define sediment status ; sediment role depends upon endpoint under consideration
  18. 18. Landscape use and biophysical conditions define sediment status ; sediment role depends upon endpoint under consideration This then defines the desirable and undesirable effects of sediment on service providing units
  19. 19. Fine-Grained Soil/ Sediment Fisheries Supporting/ Regulating 1 ˚ Production Stabilization/ Habitat maintenance Provisioning/ game Cultural/ Recreation Fine-grained sediment pathways Fine Bed Coarse Bed Water Column Estuaries Mudflats Coastal Floodplain Upland Floodplain Wetlands River and Nav Channel/Bank Lakes, Ponds, Reservoirs Salmonids/ cyprinids Column Feeding Fish Bottom Feeding Fish Invertebrates Coarse Bed Invertebrates Fine Bed Diatoms Coarse Bed Diatoms Fine Bed Macrophytes Coarse Bed Macrophytes Fine Bed Waterfowl
  20. 20. Fine-Grained Soil/ Sediment Fisheries Supporting/ Regulating 1 ˚ Production Stabilization/ Habitat maintenance Provisioning/ game Cultural/ Recreation Sediment of a given status... Arrvies at locations throughout a watershed... Having positive and negative effects on endpoints... Which are necessary to sustain ecosystem services. Fine-grained sediment pathways Fine Bed Coarse Bed Water Column Estuaries Mudflats Coastal Floodplain Upland Floodplain Wetlands River and Nav Channel/Bank Lakes, Ponds, Reservoirs Salmonids/ cyprinids Column Feeding Fish Bottom Feeding Fish Invertebrates Coarse Bed Invertebrates Fine Bed Diatoms Coarse Bed Diatoms Fine Bed Macrophytes Coarse Bed Macrophytes Fine Bed Waterfowl
  21. 21. Natural ecosystems provide a “bundle” of services From de Groot et al 2009
  22. 22. The more intensively we manage land to enhance specific services, the more others suffer From de Groot et al 2009
  23. 23. More sustainable mangement seeks to optimise the bundle of services From de Groot et al 2009
  24. 24. Different land use types result in different ecosystem service bundles from Rausdepp-Hearne et al 2010
  25. 25. Different land use types result in different ecosystem service bundles from Rausdepp-Hearne et al 2010 Utilization of ecosystem services on the landscape affects soil, sediment and water status From de Groot et al 2009
  26. 26. Landscape Biophysical Conditions Landscape Management Soil Status Sediment Status Aquatic Biophysical Conditions Aquatic Management Landscape Ecosystem Services Aquatic Ecosystem Services Sediment provides connections between landscape service use and aquatic services
  27. 27. Landscape Biophysical Conditions Landscape Management Soil Status Sediment Status Aquatic Biophysical Conditions Aquatic Management Landscape Ecosystem Services Aquatic Ecosystem Services Sediment provides connections between landscape service use and aquatic services Thus, these cannot be assessed or managed independently
  28. 28. Both intrinsic landscape properties and management activities (service use practices) affect sediment status Agricultural land use Quality parameters: Sediment-associated contaminants (C), nutrients (N), pathogens (P), organic-rich particles (O), fine sediment (FS), and coarse sediment (CS)
  29. 29. Both intrinsic landscape properties and management activities (service use practices) affect sediment status Agricultural land use Quality parameters: Sediment-associated contaminants (C), nutrients (N), pathogens (P), organic-rich particles (O), fine sediment (FS), and coarse sediment (CS)
  30. 30. Sediment status as a result of land use can be modelled using site-specific or probabilistic conditions *From S E Apitz, S Casper, A Angus and S M White (2010) The Sediment Relative Risk Model (SC080018) – A User’s Guide.
  31. 31. The transport/location continuum. In terms of SEcoRA, these are exposure factors, and must be addressed
  32. 32. Exposure issues can be modelled Calculation module for evaluating river transport issues* *From S E Apitz, S Casper, A Angus and S M White (2010) The Sediment Relative Risk Model (SC080018) – A User’s Guide.
  33. 33. We manage the landscape (on land and in water) to optimize chosen ecosystem services... Watershed image from Natural Resources Conservation Service © 2011 S E Apitz
  34. 34. This affects the status of water, soils and sediments at sites and in downstream systems... Watershed image from Natural Resources Conservation Service © 2011 S E Apitz
  35. 35. Ultimately, this affects the viability and sustainability of a variety of aquatic ecosystem services Watershed image from Natural Resources Conservation Service © 2011 S E Apitz
  36. 36. Watershed image from Natural Resources Conservation Service These trade-offs must be assessed and managed in a spatially explicit manner © 2011 S E Apitz
  37. 37. We have been developing models and tools that allow us to evaluate how management choices from the landscape perspective affect downstream aquatic ecosystem services From Apitz et al (2010) The Sediment Relative Risk Model (SC080018) – A User’s Guide
  38. 38. In future, landscape, aquatic and coastal management should be considered in terms of maximizing ecosystem services while minimizing impacts, at many scales, at sea and upland Mapping and zoning for Marine Spatial Planning
  39. 39. Conclusions <ul><li>Sediment plays complex and varied roles in ecosystem functioning and the provision of ecosystem services </li></ul><ul><li>Landscape biophysical conditions (intrinsic and due to service use) affect attributes of sediment status (quantity, quality, location and transport) </li></ul><ul><li>Effects (desirable or undesirable) of sediment to a given endpoint/SPU are a function of all aspects of status </li></ul><ul><li>SEcoRA and decision frameworks must balance the benefits of landscape-scale service use against the sustainability of aquatic ecosystem services </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Sediments themselves are only one component of ecosystems and SEcoRA is thus a component of landscape management </li></ul></ul><ul><li>While this is complex, tools are being developed to aid in such work </li></ul>
  40. 40. For more information... <ul><li>S E Apitz (2011) Conceptualising the role of sediment in sustaining ecosystem services: Sediment-Ecosystem Regional Assessment (SEcoRA), Science of the Total Environment (2011), doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2011.05.060 </li></ul><ul><li>P von der Ohe, S E Apitz, M Beketov, D Borchardt, D de Zwart, W Goedkoop, M Hein, S Hellsten, D Hering, B J Kefford, A Marcomini, V Panov, L Posthuma, R B Schäfer, E Semenzin and W Brack (in press). Chapter 3. Risk Assessment to Support River Basin Management in J Brils, D Barcelo, W Brack, D Mueller, P Negrel, T Track, J Vermaat (eds), Towards Risk-Based Management of River Basins , Handbook of Environmental Chemistry Series, Springer. </li></ul><ul><li>S E Apitz, S Casper, A Angus and S M White (2010) The Sediment Relative Risk Model (SC080018) – A User’s Guide. Report to the Environment Agency, SEA Environmental Decisions Ltd and Cranfield University, March 2010 (175p supplemented with a PowerPoint Guide). </li></ul>

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