Task 24 Behaviour Change presentation to Energy Savers Dubai

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I gave a long presentation to a very enthusiastic group of people, particularly young adults who have formed their own environmental groups, in Dubai (UAE) on June 17, 2013. It was organised by Ravinder Bhan from the UAE Energy Savers and outlined the main aspects of Task 24, various behaviour change models currently in use, and examples of cases collected for Task 24 where they were used in practice. I continued the use of storytelling, as employed by Ruth Mourik and Katy Janda at the eceee summer study to see if it was a good way to get the message across.

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Task 24 Behaviour Change presentation to Energy Savers Dubai

  1. 1. Subtasks of Task XXIV social media and Task XXIV Dr Sea Rotmann, Operating Agent Dubai Energy Savers Conference, June 17, 2013 Closing the Loop - Behaviour Change in DSM: From Theory to Practice IEA DSM TASK 24
  2. 2. Subtasks of Task XXIV social media and Task XXIV Some context !"#$%&'((')*($+,$-%.)-/$0'10$'*$#23#$ !0+*1%$'*$%*%-145-%6+,%/$!"#$%&'((')*(7$#23#$ !"#$%&'((')*($+,%-$./$0123$4)$,%567$8019$:4$'*$#;0#<$.=4$4,%*>($?5,/$./$6)=*4,/$ .-++" .*++" .,++" +" ,++" *++" -++" /++" 0++" 12345" %6789" :9;98" $<32;=98" >8728" >87?=5" @?9?=A" B?"%#*" B7554=" $9A?" (8579"
  3. 3. Subtasks of Task XXIV social media and Task XXIV Some context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
  4. 4. Subtasks of Task XXIV social media and Task XXIV Some context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
  5. 5. Subtasks of Task XXIV social media and Task XXIV Some context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
  6. 6. Subtasks of Task XXIV social media and Task XXIV Some context
  7. 7. Subtasks of Task XXIVTask 24: who are we ? THEORY PRACTICE Ruth: Science and Technology Studies, Cross-EU Behaviour Change research projects, DSM consulting Sea: Animal behaviour studies, research funding & evaluation, sustainable energy policy, sustainability implementation
  8. 8. Committee for Energy Research & Technology (CERT) Oversees 40 intʼl implementing agreements DSM Implementing Agreement (www.ieadsm.org) 15 Participating Countries Each country has ExCo member 24 Tasks - each task has Operating Agent/s (OA) Task 24: Behaviour Change in DSM (OAs: Ruth and Sea) Countries participating © OECD/IEA, October 2011 !"#$%&'#($()%(*&+%&%,(&-)(#./&!0#&122&30)4(#()5(&")&6$207&80#9+/&")&65%0:(#&;<== !"#$%&'(#&)'*(#+$#)",(-.(,/#(0-)'1(23#)4*(56,'--7(89:: Netherlands Switzerland New Zealand Belgium Norway Sweden Italy South Africa UK Austria Australia US Portugal Spain (in kind) Subtasks of Task XXIV IEA DSM Task 24 participating countries
  9. 9. Task premise The underlying proposition is that the energy efficiency gap results from:
  10. 10. 8 Target Audience of Task XXIV Pics via: theinnovativeeducator.blogspot.com, dreamstime.com, agu.org, lifesupplemented.org, rassutassu.com, change.comminit.com 1. Intermediaries 2. Policymakers 3. (Research) funders/investors 4. Technology developers, industry target audience of Task 24
  11. 11. 9 Some special features of Task XXIV Text Premise for Task XXIVspecial features of Task 24
  12. 12. 9 Some special features of Task XXIV Text Premise for Task XXIVspecial features of Task 24
  13. 13. 9 Some special features of Task XXIV Text Premise for Task XXIVspecial features of Task 24
  14. 14. 9 Some special features of Task XXIV Text Premise for Task XXIVspecial features of Task 24
  15. 15. 9 Some special features of Task XXIV Text Premise for Task XXIVspecial features of Task 24
  16. 16. 9 Some special features of Task XXIV Text Premise for Task XXIVspecial features of Task 24
  17. 17. Subtasks of Task XXIV WHY, OH WHY BEHAVIOUR? 30% of energy demand is locked in behavioural wedge Includes: technology uptake, use and maintenance purchasing and investment behaviour habits and routine behaviour social acceptability
  18. 18. What is DSM and Behaviour Change in Task 24? (in a tweet)
  19. 19. 12 An important caveat In this Task, a successful behaviour change outcome results in improved energy use by households and businesses.This does not necessarily focus solely on an immediate reduction in total energy use, but on the most efficient and environmentally friendly use of energy to derive the services that underpin societal and economic wellbeing. an important caveat
  20. 20. Subtasks of Task XXIVSubtasks 5- Expert platform 1- Helicopter view of models, frameworks, contexts, case studies and evaluation metrics 2- In depth analysis in areas of greatest need (buildings, transport, SMEs, smart metering) 3- Evaluation tool for stakeholders 4- Country- specific project ideas, action plans and pilot projects
  21. 21. Subtasks of Task XXIV subtask V - expert platform
  22. 22. 1 World Map of Participating countries, contributing experts Expert platform currently has over 170 experts from 21 countries and 7 main sectors.
  23. 23. Subtasks of Task XXIVsocial media in Task 24 @IEADSM @DrSeaRotmann IEA DSM facebook Group IEA DSM LinkedIn Group Expert platform: www.ieadsmtask24.ning.com Task 24 Wiki: www.ieadsmtask24wiki.info IEA DSM website: www.ieadsm.org Behaviour Change & Energy News www.youtube.com/IEADSM Pearltree: drsearotmann Instagram: drsea77 Storify: DrSeaRotmann
  24. 24. Subtasks of Task XXIVsocial media in Task 24
  25. 25. Subtasks of Task XXIVsocial media in Task 24
  26. 26. Subtasks of Task XXIVsocial media in Task 24
  27. 27. Subtasks of Task XXIVsocial media in Task 24
  28. 28. Subtasks of Task XXIVD2: Task 24 Wiki
  29. 29. Subtasks of Task XXIV face to face is important too! Task workshops
  30. 30. Subtasks of Task XXIV face to face is important too! Task workshops
  31. 31. Subtasks of Task XXIVenergy expert stories
  32. 32. Subtasks of Task XXIVenergy stories: sectoral !"#$%&"'() !"#$%&'%$( !"#$%&'($ !"#$%&'($% )*"$+%,-$./0"1(%,++"2$.% Energy Behaviour Challenge 1 Changing household energy cultures A research perspective Fuel efficient driving behaviour in the light vehicle fleet 15 February 2013 | Jörn Scherzer | Transport Partnerships
  33. 33. Subtasks of Task XXIVenergy stories: national IEA DSM – Task XXIV Belgian Story Brussels, September 7, 2012 The New Zealand energy story Sea Rotmann and Janet Stephenson demand-side ^ Norwegian Energy Story
  34. 34. 23 Subtask I - Helicopter OverviewPremise for Task XXIV subtask I - Helicopter Overview • Overview of models, theories, frameworks used in case studies • Overview of definitions • Inventory of experts • Inventory of evaluation metrics and contexts • Navigation tool to translate theory to be useful by practitioners
  35. 35. 24 Subtask I - Helicopter OverviewPremise for Task XXIV subtask I - some definitions Models of behaviour help us to understand specific behaviours, by identifying the underlying factors which influence them. There are individualistic models and social models. By contrast, theories of change show how behaviours change over time, and how they can be changed. Behavioural theory is diagnostic, and change theory is more pragmatic. Both are important to understand when designing interventions.
  36. 36. Subtasks of Task XXIV feedback from workshops wrong, but some of George E.P. Box (1979) owards a multiple models approach
  37. 37. 26 Subtask I - Helicopter OverviewPremise for Task XXIVmain models INDIVIDUALISTIC (A-B-C Models) Rational choice models based on cost-benefit calculations (classical economics) Information deficit models are based on linear assumptions: information generates knowledge, which shapes attitudes, which lead to behaviour (classical economics) Bounded rationality models include psychological principles such as cognitive biases and environmental constraints (behavioural economics) Value Action Gap shows the difference of what people say and what they do (social psychology) single specific rational decision every time it is done. In e is always important to bear both perspectives in mind. Individualist Model of B This section sets out an individualist representation of beh models that can be used from this social psychological pe around “Triandis’ Theory of Interpersonal Behaviour”4 , a m range of research as being well suited to use with regard describing the basic structure of this model, this section th concerning ‘Behavioural Economics (or MINDSPACE)’ an currently being adopted to explain behaviour change and the model. Simple Models - ABC Individualist models of behaviour focus on different compo processes, and how these then lead to actions. They ran complex ones. However, most follow a basic structure th Attitude Behaviour Choice/Context/Constraint (different pe the ‘C’ at different times but the general principle remains very instrumental in their view of behaviour. They treat pe independent individuals who decide what they want to do intention give-or-take sets of identifiable constraints or ba grounding in traditional economically rational views of beh been extensively adopted by government.
  38. 38. 27 Subtask I - Helicopter OverviewPremise for Task XXIVmain models INDIVIDUALISTIC Theory of Planned Behaviour (social psychology) Figure 2.5: Rogers’ Protection Motivation Theory (1975) As EV models become more extended (and thus more ‘adjusted’) through the inclusion of additional factors, so the relative influence of attitudes in predicting behavioural outcomes declines. This pattern can be seen as Ajzen extended the TRA into the even more widely- used Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB, first published in 1986, in Ajzen 1991 - Figure 2.6). B e h a v io u rIn te n tio n A ttitu d e to w a rd s th e b e h a v io u r S u b je c tiv e n o rm B e lie fs a b o u t o u tc o m e s E v a lu a tio n o f o u tc o m e s B e lie fs a b o u t w h a t o th e rs th in k R e la tiv e im p o rta nc e o f a ttitu d e a nd n o rm P e rc e iv e d B e h a v io u ra l C o n tro l Figure 2.6: Ajzen’s Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB), (1986) 10 very instrumental in their view of behaviour. They treat independent individuals who decide what they want to d intention give-or-take sets of identifiable constraints or b grounding in traditional economically rational views of b been extensively adopted by government. Figure 1: Linear model of decision making and beh Figure 1 shows a simplistic model of this rational, individ individual has a range of attitudes and preferences. On of relevant information, he/she forms an intention to act enacted – resulting in “behaviour”. ! "#$%&'(%)*"+,*"-.//,"0'12$32$)4'&5"627&8%49$,":4'12$2;*"<=>"?$44@()A<452
  39. 39. 28 Subtask I - Helicopter OverviewPremise for Task XXIVmain models INDIVIDUALISTIC Value Belief Norms Theory (social psychology) Cialdini’s Focus Theory of Normative Conduct (social psychology) Schwartz’ Norm Activation Theory (social psychology) Triandis’ Theory of Interpersonal Behaviour includes habit (social psychology) single specific rational decision every time it is done. In encoura is always important to bear both perspectives in mind. Individualist Model of Beh This section sets out an individualist representation of behaviour models that can be used from this social psychological perspect around “Triandis’ Theory of Interpersonal Behaviour”4 , a model t range of research as being well suited to use with regard to ener describing the basic structure of this model, this section then intr concerning ‘Behavioural Economics (or MINDSPACE)’ and ‘Valu currently being adopted to explain behaviour change and which the model. Simple Models - ABC Individualist models of behaviour focus on different components processes, and how these then lead to actions. They range from complex ones. However, most follow a basic structure that is de Attitude Behaviour Choice/Context/Constraint (different people h the ‘C’ at different times but the general principle remains much very instrumental in their view of behaviour. They treat people a independent individuals who decide what they want to do, and th intention give-or-take sets of identifiable constraints or barriers. B grounding in traditional economically rational views of behaviour been extensively adopted by government. Figure 1: Linear model of decision making and behaviour
  40. 40. 29 Subtask I - Helicopter OverviewPremise for Task XXIV MAIN MODELS: psychology DUAL PROCESS Models of Cognition Triandis’ Theory of Interpersonal Behaviour (TIB) (social psychology)
  41. 41. 29 Subtask I - Helicopter OverviewPremise for Task XXIV MAIN MODELS: psychology DUAL PROCESS Models of Cognition Triandis’ Theory of Interpersonal Behaviour (TIB) (social psychology)
  42. 42. 29 Subtask I - Helicopter OverviewPremise for Task XXIV MAIN MODELS: psychology DUAL PROCESS Models of Cognition Triandis’ Theory of Interpersonal Behaviour (TIB) (social psychology)
  43. 43. 30 Subtask I - Helicopter OverviewPremise for Task XXIV societal model: practice theory SOCIALLY ORIENTED MODELS Needs Opportunities Abilities Theory (sociology) Theory of Consumption as Social Practices (socio- technical studies) DECC running header
  44. 44. 31 Subtask I - Helicopter OverviewPremise for Task XXIVsociology Practice Theory (worked example line drying) 54 Figure 6: 3 Elements Worked Example: Linedrying
  45. 45. 32 Subtask I - Helicopter OverviewPremise for Task XXIVtheories of change  Central to many conceptions of change is the merging of theory and practice.  Applied approaches: Social Marketing, Shared Learning, Defra’s 4 E Model etc segment 5. Whilst they are more dependent on behaviours becoming the norm before they will act and more embarrassed to be green, segment 5 are willing to do more. The emphasis here should be on interventions that enable, encourage and, in particular, exemplify, for example providing fiscal incentives or businesses and government leading by example. Segments 6 and 7 are generally less willing to act and are less likely to be open to voluntary engagement or exemplification by others; the emphasis here is likely to have to be on interventions that enable and encourage, for example choice editing in product availability or, where necessary, regulation. Success in encouraging segment 1 to do more may also help encourage 3 and 4, given the higher numbers in group 1 that seek to influence others and that this is a broader group than ‘deep greens’. It is likely that motivating segments 1, 3 and 4 to adopt more environmentally friendly behaviours will help interventions to encourage segment 5. Figure 9: diagrammatic representation of the 4E’s model
  46. 46. 33 Subtask I - Helicopter OverviewPremise for Task XXIV changing habits - individuals Methods:  Unfreezing/Refreezing (emotional stir-up) Vigilant Monitoring (avoid cues)  Implementation Intentions (if-then plans) ==> But: individuals need to be pre-motivated, they need to be done quickly and intensely and they may not be easily scaleable  Moments of Change
  47. 47. 34 Subtask I - Helicopter OverviewPremise for Task XXIVpros and cons Individualistic modelsIndividualistic models Social modelsSocial models Pros Cons Pros Cons Some have understanding of dual process of cognition Easy to follow A+B +C= behaviour change Can look at various (mostly influencing) contexts affecting individuals Known and tested Very powerful with segmentation and bottom-up tailoring Scaleability Inclusivity Breadth of Scope Causal relationship hard to determine Not shown to be that effective, especially if based on intentions More complex models hard to use Takes systemic approach thus easily scaled up If you change a practice, it can be a global change Looped, re-inforcing Influencing and contextual factors Fosters collaboration among all sectors More realistic? Too complex to understand? Dependent on many elements to work together Frustrating if right collaboration can’t be fostered Hard to put into practice May only speed up change
  48. 48. 35 Subtask I - Helicopter OverviewPremise for Task XXIVworked examples in Task 24 Domain/Country Cases and used theories/models Netherlands New Zealand Switzerland Italy Austria Norway Sweden Belgium UK Other countries Smart Metering/ Feedback Jouw Energie Moment Theories/Models used: Expectancy Value Theory Design with Intent Interpretation for sustainable behaviour Responses to Time Varying Prices for Electricity (Otago Uni) Theories/Model used: Classical Economics and marketing Smart Metering Zurich Pilot EWZ and EKZ Theories/Model used: behavioural economics and social norms/comparisons Time of Use Tariff Theories/Models: Classical Economics Die Energiejagd Theories/Models: Shared learning, Social Norming, freezing/ unfreezing Demosteinkjer Theories/Models: Theory of Planned Behaviour Clockwise Theories/Models: Constructivist Learning Theory Shared learning Rettie, Ruth CHARM Theories/Models used: social norms approach practice theory Spain (Juan Pablo Garçia): VERDIEM Theories/Models: Classical Economics Smart Metering/ Feedback Smart Metering EKT Dietikon Theories/Model used: behavioural model of residential energy use by Raaij & Verhallen behavioural economics and social norms/comparisons !CO2 Management Theories/Models: Classical Economics Portugal (Joane Abreu): Smart meter feedback in North Theories: Nudge, classical economics, moments of change Smart Metering/ Feedback Munx Repower website Theories/Model used: behavioural economics, social norming US (Michela Beltracchi): Opower feedback programme Models: Cialdini’s Social Norming Retrofitting Blok voor Blok aanpak, retrofitting programme Theories/models used: Behavioural economics Warm Up New Zealand: Heat Smart Theories/Models used: social marketing; social norms; classical economic; TPB Swiss Building Retrofit Program Models: Classical Economics Retrofitting of Myhrenenga Housing Theories: TPB Building retrofits Theories: Shared Learning Retrofitting 2000 Watts Society (housing) Models: Ethics, long-term visioning SMEs De Groene Daad Theory/model used: Nudge EECA SME Crown Loans Scheme Theory/model used: originally based on TPB; changed to social learning and social norm theories Energy-Model and SME-Model from (EnAW) Theories/Models used: Classical Economics Social norm Finnfjord Theories: Leadership Build4Change Model: Nudge Energy Cultures SMEs pilot Model used: Energy Cultures Mobility Het Nieuwe Rijden (the New Driving) Theories and models used: Psychology: Henry A Murray (1938) and the acceptability/availability model of behaviour by Rose (1990). Active a2b Theory/models used: Norm Activation Theory Elaboration Likelihood Model Stern’s Principles for Intervening Triandis TIB Lewin’s Unfreezing/Refreezing McKenzie-Mohr 2000 Watt on mobility Models: Ethics, long-term visioning Electric vehicles Nobil Theories/Models used: TPB Stockholm congestion tax Models: activity based models Chatterton & Wilson Framework Combining individualistic (eg Triandis) and societal (Practice theory) approaches to help UK policymakers Kevin Luten UrbanTrans (Australia) Transport behaviour change based on BJ Fogg Mobility NZ Post Transport Driver behaviour training Theory/models used: Value Action Gap Theory Fuel consumption of newly purchased cars Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) and Norm-Activation Model (NAM) Case studies collected for IEA DSM Task 24 in transport, building retrofits, SMEs and smart metering Note: Blue boxes denote government-led policies and programmes, green boxes denote business, research or community-led programmes and pilots
  49. 49. 36 Subtask I - Helicopter OverviewPremise for Task XXIVsome of the cases TRANSPORT:The New Driving, Netherlands Models used:Various psychological models BUILDING RETROFITS: Retrofitting Myhrenenga Housing, Norway Models used:Theory of Planned Behaviour SMART METERING: Smart metering pilots, Switzerland Models used: Behavioural Economics, social norming SMEs: Crown loans for SME energy savings, New Zealand Models used: Classical economics then shared learning
  50. 50. 37 • Identify the range of models/theories used in DSM interventions in: • smart metering • SMEs • (personal) mobility • retrofitting • Understand the benefits and drawbacks • Impact on design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation • We collected more than 40 cases, often “learning” stories • Currently 3 main models or theories informing the retrofitting interventions Subtask I: Analysis by example of retrofitting
  51. 51. 38 Several of our Retrofitting cases informed by neo classical economics: money and information http://www.contemporaryartdaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/2.jpg http://pinterest.com/kyrpersa/homo-economicus/ Observations retrofitting
  52. 52. 39 • Money makes the world go round • You need to change your home’s energy use and we will help you by paying (part of) its retrofitting • By the way, you need to pay up first and then it’ll take a while before we pay you back…. • The information we need from you will teach you all you need to know • You only need to make a one-time decision to invest • We have the technology you need, we will put it in and that’s it! • If you do not understand the technology, just don’t touch the buttons… • You will save money for a nice weekend to the Bahamas • You only need to give us a bill from your installer, we probably won’t check what actually happened in your home • What counts for us is how many ( m2, $ spent, Number of homes) • We will do the number crunching but we do not need to know what you actually saved, we will use models to calculate all energy savings • But if you want to know how much energy you saved, buy a metering device. Neo classical economics and retrofitting
  53. 53. 40 Observations retrofitting enayetkabir.blogspot.com greenbookblog.com Several of our Retrofitting cases informed by behavioural economics
  54. 54. 41 • Money makes the world go round • Information helps us both • You have many choices but we will make sure you will make the right one to retrofit your home • And to do so, we have the money & technology you need and we will design rules, regulations, institutions, or infrastructure that will nudge you in the right direction • You only need, not only for yourself but for the sake of everyone, to make a one-time decision to invest • You will save money or the environment or whatever matters to you • You only need to give us a bill from your installer, we won’t check what really happened in your home • What counts for us is how many ( M2, $, homes) • We will use models to calculate energy savings • But if you want to know how much energy, CO2, trees or polar bears you saved, buy a metering device Behavioural economics and retrofitting
  55. 55. 42 They do well within what they intend to do • The programmes are relatively easy to evaluate in quantitative terms and often show really good results • The retrofitting market can grow • Subsidies are often used up to the max • Many homes do get insulated • Behavioural economics does manage to nudge a certain percentage • Free riders upgrade their plans and retrofit more comprehensively • Sometimes even a new norm seems to be emerging… But if we want to tell a learning story: • One-off programmes, no continuity after insulation • Paradox: demand for information! And a lot of pre-financing required… • Only financial and technological tailoring • Hardly any flexibility or end user participation • Only fostering self-interested, extrinsic motivations (money) • Technocratic and policy-driven approach • Not focused on changing energy use patterns (routine behaviour) • Danger of rebound • And: will this really change the building sector or market long term? What can we learn?
  56. 56. 43 blogs.scientificamerican.com   Systemic approaches and retrofitting
  57. 57. 44 • Together we will make the world go round • You embody what we need to know and change: do, feel, learn • We will help you understand and use the technology, and train those that install and sell it to you • We will create a supportive material, institutional and social environment to ensure your needs are met • Your needs are important so we need to do this together, as if this were your kitchen or bathroom you are renovating • Your life will change • Its all about us now and our grandchildren - altruistic, intrinsic • Quality matters and we will keep learning and sharing • If we need to be flexible we will • This is only the start of a long way and your home is the first step • We will monitor, calculate and report on energy, money, health, welfare, comfort, wellbeing • And learnings based on qualitative and quantitative inputs will be shared (with you) • We will help you figure out what your impact is to be able to make sure you get where we collectively want to! Systemic approaches and retrofitting
  58. 58. 45 The storyline certainly appeals to many and acknowledges the social and inter-related elements of practices And these approaches are often experienced as successful by those who are participating Important additional elements to highlight: 1. Focus on creating trusted messengers and market parties (audits, certification schemes, quality standards, energy labeling, provider training etc) 2. More focus on institutional capacity building 3. Targeting needs central: also non-energy! 4. More pre-scoping to understand what and why of behaviour But if we want to tell a learning story: • These types of interventions are very complex with many partners • They cannot be driven by policy alone, need all levels collaborating • Not everyone wants to change everything or their lifestyle • Not everyone wants to engage • The flexibility of changing goals, aims and interrelatedness of issues etc makes it difficult to evaluate What can we learn?
  59. 59. 46 1. Theories or models were mainly used explicitly…? 2. Storytelling very powerful way to avoid social dilemma 3. Peer-training is essential (learning to cycle, drive, save fuel) 4. Programmes hardly ever about energy or money! 5. Mostly all do pre-scoping! Evidence based… 6. Importance of urban design and accompanying infrastructures appreciated 7. Capacity building and habit breaking central to many programmes 8. Often mix of interventions 9. Getting people to use the car less proves difficult (Sweden exception?), it’s mostly about using it differently…. 10. Direct social environment hardly tackled (work, family, friends, colleagues) General conclusions: transport
  60. 60. 47 Subtask I - Helicopter OverviewPremise for Task XXIV subtask II - case studies
  61. 61. 48 Subtask I - Helicopter OverviewPremise for Task XXIV subtask III - evaluation  WHAT IS A SUCCESSFUL LONG-TERM BEHAVIOUR CHANGE OUTCOME TOYOU?
  62. 62. 49 Subtask IV: Country-specific recommendations 19 subtask IV - country-specific recommendations
  63. 63. Subtasks of Task XXIVquestions or comments? drsea@orcon.net.nz

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