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Sea Rotmann IEA DSM Task 24 workshop Subtask 2 case studies
Sea Rotmann IEA DSM Task 24 workshop Subtask 2 case studies
Sea Rotmann IEA DSM Task 24 workshop Subtask 2 case studies
Sea Rotmann IEA DSM Task 24 workshop Subtask 2 case studies
Sea Rotmann IEA DSM Task 24 workshop Subtask 2 case studies
Sea Rotmann IEA DSM Task 24 workshop Subtask 2 case studies
Sea Rotmann IEA DSM Task 24 workshop Subtask 2 case studies
Sea Rotmann IEA DSM Task 24 workshop Subtask 2 case studies
Sea Rotmann IEA DSM Task 24 workshop Subtask 2 case studies
Sea Rotmann IEA DSM Task 24 workshop Subtask 2 case studies
Sea Rotmann IEA DSM Task 24 workshop Subtask 2 case studies
Sea Rotmann IEA DSM Task 24 workshop Subtask 2 case studies
Sea Rotmann IEA DSM Task 24 workshop Subtask 2 case studies
Sea Rotmann IEA DSM Task 24 workshop Subtask 2 case studies
Sea Rotmann IEA DSM Task 24 workshop Subtask 2 case studies
Sea Rotmann IEA DSM Task 24 workshop Subtask 2 case studies
Sea Rotmann IEA DSM Task 24 workshop Subtask 2 case studies
Sea Rotmann IEA DSM Task 24 workshop Subtask 2 case studies
Sea Rotmann IEA DSM Task 24 workshop Subtask 2 case studies
Sea Rotmann IEA DSM Task 24 workshop Subtask 2 case studies
Sea Rotmann IEA DSM Task 24 workshop Subtask 2 case studies
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Sea Rotmann IEA DSM Task 24 workshop Subtask 2 case studies

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  • 1. Subtasks of Task XXIV social media and Task XXIV Dr Sea Rotmann, Operating Agent Trondheim Expert workshop May 28, 2013 Closing the Loop - Behaviour Change in DSM: From Theory to Practice IEA DSM TASK 24
  • 2. Subtasks of Task XXIVsubtasks 5- Expert platform 1- Helicopter view of models, frameworks, contexts, case studies and evaluation metrics 2- In depth analysis in areas of greatest need (buildings, transport, SMEs, smart metering) 3- Evaluation tool for stakeholders 4- Country- specific project ideas, action plans and pilot projects
  • 3. Subtasks of Task XXIVsubtasks 5- Expert platform 1- Helicopter view of models, frameworks, contexts, case studies and evaluation metrics 2- In depth analysis in areas of greatest need (buildings, transport, SMEs, smart metering) 3- Evaluation tool for stakeholders 4- Country- specific project ideas, action plans and pilot projects 2- In depth analysis in areas of greatest need (buildings, transport, SMEs, smart metering)
  • 4. 3 Subtask I - Helicopter OverviewPremise for Task XXIV subtask II - case studies 1. Description of the preparation, implementation and impact of the intervention (case) A. Key words/tags (e.g. Energy policy; Efficient housing; Sustainable mobility; Sustainable consumption; Lifestyle; ….) B. Intervention: basic characteristics - Year, name, country, geographical scope, is it a project, programme or policy? - Available resources (people, money) - to get an idea of the scope and magnitude of the intervention - Who is involved in the preparation, implementation / monitoring and evaluation? How is the distribution of roles, tasks and responsibilities? - Contact details of person in charge/in the know, website or link to report, if available - list of evaluation materials, interviews taken etc. C. Context: (e.g. country level legislation, geography, social norms, tradition, technology, infrastructure, previous experience etc) - Context-specific issues that (may have) had an impact on the design and implementation of the intervention. - Context-specific issues that (may have) had an impact on the choice and and the use of the MoU D. Goals and focus on behaviour Goals, problems addressed, behaviours targeted and context addressed • What is the stated overall aim of the intervention? • What problem does the intervention address? (as stated by the intervention) • What goals in terms of behavioural changes are formulated? (according to this intervention) (eg reduce energy use, increase comfort and warmth, reduced GHGs, change market, increase jobs etc) • Which target group (s) does the intervention aim at? What does the intervention focus on (try to use these categories): - Individual behaviours: (e.g. reduction of energy consumption at the individual level) - Social norms: (e.g. establishment of social norms) - Social practices: (e.g. addressing daily practices like washing, caring, cooking) - Institutional environment (e.g. improving collaboration stakeholders; policy) - Physical infrastructure & technology: (e.g. choice architecture, physical architecture, smart meters) Types of behaviour and lasting behaviours • Does the intervention/approach distinguish between different types of behaviour? (e.g. routine behaviours; one-off actions; conscious behaviours; or does it focus on social practices?). • How does the intervention aim at persistence/lasting behavioural change (relevant in case of routine behavioural changes) E. Monitoring and evaluation metrics What monitoring and evaluation metrics or key performance indicators have been used to evaluate the outcomes of the intervention? H. Main outcomes (up to ½ side A4): (successfulness of the intervention and other other impacts, effects and lessons) Outcomes and effects • To what extent has the intervention contributed to the intended behavioural changes? • What contextual variables and alternative explanations for the observed effects that are independent of the intervention) may have played a role (eg economic growth; crisis; demographic trends; supporting policies / regulations) • What are the immediate effects, e.g. in terms of target range, number of participants etc? How is this measured? Are these incidental or structural? • What are the indirect effects? How is this measured? Are these incidental or structural? • Are there any unintended undesirable side effects of the intervention? Which ones? • Are there desirable side effects of the the intervention? Which ones? • What can be said about the cost-benefit distribution? (who beard the costs, who benefits) Success? To what extent can this intervention be regarded successful in affecting behavioural change? • Which elements of the intervention have proven effective? Which ones have not? • Under what conditions can the impact be optimized? • Is this intervention, or parts thereof, replicable elsewhere? Under what conditions? • To what extent have the original aims been achieved? To what extent have ex ante theoretical notions about how to achieve behavioural change 2. The underlying Models of Understanding (MoU)/Theories of Change (ToC) and other insights and how these have been used in the preparation, implementation and evaluation of the intervention A. Summary of the MoU/ToC used and how it was used (up to ½ side A4) • What MoU/ToC or perspective(s) informed or inspired the intervention (ex-ante)? • Was this underlying perspective made explicit and if so, how/where? • Why was the MoU/ToC used? (e.g. prior experience, failure of p/p/p) • How was the model/theory chosen? (e.g. chance, on purpose) • Which elements of the MoU/ToC were used? • in the design of the intervention
  • 5. 4 Subtask I - Helicopter OverviewPremise for Task XXIVworked examples in Task 24 Domain/Country Cases and used theories/models Netherlands New Zealand Switzerland Italy Austria Norway Sweden Belgium UK Other countries Smart Metering/ Feedback Jouw Energie Moment Theories/Models used: Expectancy Value Theory Design with Intent Interpretation for sustainable behaviour Responses to Time Varying Prices for Electricity (Otago Uni) Theories/Model used: Classical Economics and marketing Smart Metering Zurich Pilot EWZ and EKZ Theories/Model used: behavioural economics and social norms/comparisons Time of Use Tariff Theories/Models: Classical Economics Die Energiejagd Theories/Models: Shared learning, Social Norming, freezing/ unfreezing Demosteinkjer Theories/Models: Theory of Planned Behaviour Clockwise Theories/Models: Constructivist Learning Theory Shared learning Rettie, Ruth CHARM Theories/Models used: social norms approach practice theory Spain (Juan Pablo Garçia): VERDIEM Theories/Models: Classical Economics Smart Metering/ Feedback Smart Metering EKT Dietikon Theories/Model used: behavioural model of residential energy use by Raaij & Verhallen behavioural economics and social norms/comparisons !CO2 Management Theories/Models: Classical Economics Portugal (Joane Abreu): Smart meter feedback in North Theories: Nudge, classical economics, moments of change Smart Metering/ Feedback Munx Repower website Theories/Model used: behavioural economics, social norming US (Michela Beltracchi): Opower feedback programme Models: Cialdini’s Social Norming Retrofitting Blok voor Blok aanpak, retrofitting programme Theories/models used: Behavioural economics Warm Up New Zealand: Heat Smart Theories/Models used: social marketing; social norms; classical economic; TPB Swiss Building Retrofit Program Models: Classical Economics Retrofitting of Myhrenenga Housing Theories: TPB Building retrofits Theories: Shared Learning Retrofitting 2000 Watts Society (housing) Models: Ethics, long-term visioning SMEs De Groene Daad Theory/model used: Nudge EECA SME Crown Loans Scheme Theory/model used: originally based on TPB; changed to social learning and social norm theories Energy-Model and SME-Model from (EnAW) Theories/Models used: Classical Economics Social norm Finnfjord Theories: Leadership Build4Change Model: Nudge Energy Cultures SMEs pilot Model used: Energy Cultures Mobility Het Nieuwe Rijden (the New Driving) Theories and models used: Psychology: Henry A Murray (1938) and the acceptability/availability model of behaviour by Rose (1990). Active a2b Theory/models used: Norm Activation Theory Elaboration Likelihood Model Stern’s Principles for Intervening Triandis TIB Lewin’s Unfreezing/Refreezing McKenzie-Mohr 2000 Watt on mobility Models: Ethics, long-term visioning Electric vehicles Nobil Theories/Models used: TPB Stockholm congestion tax Models: activity based models Chatterton & Wilson Framework Combining individualistic (eg Triandis) and societal (Practice theory) approaches to help UK policymakers Kevin Luten UrbanTrans (Australia) Transport behaviour change based on BJ Fogg Mobility NZ Post Transport Driver behaviour training Theory/models used: Value Action Gap Theory Fuel consumption of newly purchased cars Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) and Norm-Activation Model (NAM) Case studies collected for IEA DSM Task 24 in transport, building retrofits, SMEs and smart metering Note: Blue boxes denote government-led policies and programmes, green boxes denote business, research or community-led programmes and pilots
  • 6. 5 Subtask I - Helicopter OverviewPremise for Task XXIV subtask II - case studies
  • 7. Subtask IV: Country-specific recommendations 6 subtask IV - country-specific recommendations
  • 8. 7 Subtask I - Helicopter OverviewPremise for Task XXIV subtask II - case studies Individual behaviour Social norm Social Practice Institutional environment Physical environment (technology; infrastructure Policy, legislation, regulation, requirements, emission levels, permits, (in) formal agreements etc. Economic instruments (subsidies; levies; fiscal measures; technology procurement etc) + (blabla…) + (blabla… ) + (blabla…) + (blabla…) Information, communication, education (Labelling, certificates, emission-information, foodprints, marketing, eduction, campaigns etc.) + (blabla… ) + (blabla…)
  • 9. 7 Subtask I - Helicopter OverviewPremise for Task XXIV subtask II - case studies Individual behaviour Social norm Social Practice Institutional environment Physical environment (technology; infrastructure Policy, legislation, regulation, requirements, emission levels, permits, (in) formal agreements etc. Economic instruments (subsidies; levies; fiscal measures; technology procurement etc) + (blabla…) + (blabla… ) + (blabla…) + (blabla…) Information, communication, education (Labelling, certificates, emission-information, foodprints, marketing, eduction, campaigns etc.) + (blabla… ) + (blabla…) Cases Types of instrumenten: - policy/legislative; - economic - information/ communication Types of instrumenten: - policy/legislative; - economic - information/ communication Types of instrumenten: - policy/legislative; - economic - information/ communication What does the intervention focus on: - individual behaviour - social norms - social practices - institutional aspects - physical environment What does the intervention focus on: - individual behaviour - social norms - social practices - institutional aspects - physical environment What does the intervention focus on: - individual behaviour - social norms - social practices - institutional aspects - physical environment What does the intervention focus on: - individual behaviour - social norms - social practices - institutional aspects - physical environment What does the intervention focus on: - individual behaviour - social norms - social practices - institutional aspects - physical environment Type of behaviour: - routine - concious behaviour - one-shot behaviour Type of behaviour: - routine - concious behaviour - one-shot behaviour Type of behaviour: - routine - concious behaviour - one-shot behaviour Cases Policy/ leg economic inform ation Individual behaviour S o c i a l norm Practice Institutional context Physical context routine concious behaviour one-shot behaviour e . g . name + - + + + +
  • 10. Subtasks of Task XXIVor? Full framework for characterising behaviours: 4 dimensions x 5 levels Developed from Wilson and Chatterton (2011) SCOPE! Discrete! Inter- Related! Bundled! Structuring! Lifestyle! DOMAIN! Cognitive! Bodily! Tech- nological! Institutional / Social! Infra- structural! What are the influences on the behaviour? DURABILITY! One-off! Repeated! Dependent! Enduring! Norm- Setting! What relationship does time have with the behaviour? How does the behaviour relate to other behaviours? ACTOR! Individual! Inter-Personal Network! Community! Segment/ Group! Population! Who, or what is enacting the behaviour?
  • 11. 9 Subtask I - Helicopter OverviewPremise for Task XXIV subtask II - semi-structured interviews 1. What drove the project manager/initiator 2. How has the organisational culture affected design and implementation? 3. How have earlier experiences influenced the choice for a particular intervention, the design and implementation of it? 4. How have national, regional and local context factors been of influence on the choices made (for the intervention, the MoU, design and implementation). 5. How successful is the intervention? In what terms? How has this been assessed? 6. To what extent is it useful for replication? (which elements, where, what scale) 7. What preliminary ideas did the PM have with regard to (the need for) behavioural change and the mechanisms behind behavioural change? 8. What, if any, theories or insights did the PM draw upon? How were these insights translated into the project design? 9. How where these insights translated into the monitoring and evaluation approach? 10.What trade-offs have been made in terms of the scope of the project, elements addressed, and in terms of monitoring and evaluation (e.g. what things that might have seemed logical to do, considering the choice for this particular approach and intervention, but was not done, and why?) 11.Have these MoU/ToC and (other) social scientific insights of use? Why and how (not)? 12.What practical barriers are there that hinder a proper use of existing social scientific insights? 13.What if they would not have used these insights as a basis, would that have been a problem? Why (not) ? 14.To what extent is the design an outcome of the choice of a particular MoU? 15.Do you think that this choice resulted in too little attention for other aspects? If so, for which ones? How did you resolve that? 16.What are the 3 most important lessons to be learned from this intervention?
  • 12. 10 Subtask I - Helicopter OverviewPremise for Task XXIV First in-depth analysis Austria
  • 13. 11 Subtask I - Helicopter OverviewPremise for Task XXIV€CO2 Management www.grazer-ea.at Haushaltskasse aufbessern Wärmekosten senken Klimaschonend durchstarten Tipps zum Energiesparenbei Strom | bei Wärme | bei Mobilität ergiesparen? osten und ein nachhaltiger Beitrag zum Klimaschutz sind nur zwei uten Gründen, um seinen Energieverbrauch zu senken. Dabei gilt es, nziale zu erkennen und Energiespartipps zu nutzen.Warum Energiesparen? Geringere Kosten und ein nachhaltiger Beitrag zum Klimaschutz sind nur zwei von vielen guten Gründen, um seinen Energieverbrauch zu senken. Dabei gilt es, Energiepotenziale zu erkennen und Energiespartipps zu nutzen. 500 7.5006.5005.5004.5003.5002.5001.500 Stromverbrauch (kWh) Haushaltsgröße ab Bewertung des Stromverbrauchs im Haushalt (kWh) sehr effizient verbesserungsfähig sehr ineffizient
  • 14. 11 Subtask I - Helicopter OverviewPremise for Task XXIV€CO2 Management www.grazer-ea.at Haushaltskasse aufbessern Wärmekosten senken Klimaschonend durchstarten Tipps zum Energiesparenbei Strom | bei Wärme | bei Mobilität ergiesparen? osten und ein nachhaltiger Beitrag zum Klimaschutz sind nur zwei uten Gründen, um seinen Energieverbrauch zu senken. Dabei gilt es, nziale zu erkennen und Energiespartipps zu nutzen.Warum Energiesparen? Geringere Kosten und ein nachhaltiger Beitrag zum Klimaschutz sind nur zwei von vielen guten Gründen, um seinen Energieverbrauch zu senken. Dabei gilt es, Energiepotenziale zu erkennen und Energiespartipps zu nutzen. 500 7.5006.5005.5004.5003.5002.5001.500 Stromverbrauch (kWh) Haushaltsgröße ab Bewertung des Stromverbrauchs im Haushalt (kWh) sehr effizient verbesserungsfähig sehr ineffizient
  • 15. 11 Subtask I - Helicopter OverviewPremise for Task XXIV€CO2 Management www.grazer-ea.at Haushaltskasse aufbessern Wärmekosten senken Klimaschonend durchstarten Tipps zum Energiesparenbei Strom | bei Wärme | bei Mobilität ergiesparen? osten und ein nachhaltiger Beitrag zum Klimaschutz sind nur zwei uten Gründen, um seinen Energieverbrauch zu senken. Dabei gilt es, nziale zu erkennen und Energiespartipps zu nutzen.Warum Energiesparen? Geringere Kosten und ein nachhaltiger Beitrag zum Klimaschutz sind nur zwei von vielen guten Gründen, um seinen Energieverbrauch zu senken. Dabei gilt es, Energiepotenziale zu erkennen und Energiespartipps zu nutzen. 500 7.5006.5005.5004.5003.5002.5001.500 Stromverbrauch (kWh) Haushaltsgröße ab Bewertung des Stromverbrauchs im Haushalt (kWh) sehr effizient verbesserungsfähig sehr ineffizient 13 Geräte- bezeichnung Stk. Leistung Stand-by (Watt) Stand-by- Betrieb (Std./Tag) Stand-by- Stromverbrauch (kWh/Jahr) Stand-by- Stromkosten (€ im Jahr) Meine Geräte Stk. €/Jahr Stand-by-Geräte im Vergleich
  • 16. 11 Subtask I - Helicopter OverviewPremise for Task XXIV€CO2 Management www.grazer-ea.at Haushaltskasse aufbessern Wärmekosten senken Klimaschonend durchstarten Tipps zum Energiesparenbei Strom | bei Wärme | bei Mobilität ergiesparen? osten und ein nachhaltiger Beitrag zum Klimaschutz sind nur zwei uten Gründen, um seinen Energieverbrauch zu senken. Dabei gilt es, nziale zu erkennen und Energiespartipps zu nutzen.Warum Energiesparen? Geringere Kosten und ein nachhaltiger Beitrag zum Klimaschutz sind nur zwei von vielen guten Gründen, um seinen Energieverbrauch zu senken. Dabei gilt es, Energiepotenziale zu erkennen und Energiespartipps zu nutzen. 500 7.5006.5005.5004.5003.5002.5001.500 Stromverbrauch (kWh) Haushaltsgröße ab Bewertung des Stromverbrauchs im Haushalt (kWh) sehr effizient verbesserungsfähig sehr ineffizient 13 Geräte- bezeichnung Stk. Leistung Stand-by (Watt) Stand-by- Betrieb (Std./Tag) Stand-by- Stromverbrauch (kWh/Jahr) Stand-by- Stromkosten (€ im Jahr) Meine Geräte Stk. €/Jahr Stand-by-Geräte im Vergleich Beispiel Meine Kosten
  • 17. 12 Subtask I - Helicopter OverviewPremise for Task XXIVDie Energiejagd
  • 18. 12 Subtask I - Helicopter OverviewPremise for Task XXIVDie Energiejagd
  • 19. 13 Subtask I - Helicopter OverviewPremise for Task XXIV Austria - Die Energiejagd vs €CO2 Management social approach individualistic approach social norm (MoU) social learning (ToC) Freezing/unfreezing (ToC) classical economics (MoU) Gamification, competition, feedback, tailored advice, champions Feedback,Advice & Incentive (iPod!) Goal: CO2 savingsGoal: CO2 savings Huge success Unexpected failure
  • 20. 14 Subtask I - Helicopter OverviewPremise for Task XXIV next: Norway SMEs Finnfjord
  • 21. Subtasks of Task XXIVquestions or comments? drsea@orcon.net.nz

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