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Making energy efficiency research relevant

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ECEEE summer study 2011 presentation on using social media to promote energy efficiency research in New Zealand. Panel 8 - Dynamics of Consumption (which I co-led with Michael Ornetzeder)

ECEEE summer study 2011 presentation on using social media to promote energy efficiency research in New Zealand. Panel 8 - Dynamics of Consumption (which I co-led with Michael Ornetzeder)

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  • Out here you can start with that reduction in energy consumption is predicated on people changing their behaviours. A lot of work has been done in this area – but the key is getting to communicate with the consumers – end users. Social media offers two way engagement\n
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    • 1. Paper No. 263 Dr Sea RotmannMaking Energy Efficiency Research Relevant A note on the evaluation of social media as a tool for engaging energy practitioners and consumers Authors: Dr Sea Rotmann, Amardeep Sandhu, and Dr Lauren Christie
    • 2. Emissions in NZIn 2008 - 45% of the Green-House gases from energy 1% increase every 3 yearsNZ’s 2010 Energy Efficiency and Conservation Strategy reflects this by setting atarget of saving 55PJ with targeted energy efficiency interventionsby 2025
    • 3. Connecting with the Consumer – the promise of social mediaThere is great body of work around influencing consumerbehaviour Efficiency – including buying behaviours Curtailment – conservation and energy saving behavioursSocial Media holds the promise of a two-wayengagement Collaborative Real time feedback Permanent Access Nudge Overcome locational constraint Evidenced M&E Engage – Digital Natives Language of the Alignment with capability consumer
    • 4. The Motivating Change Project Can social media extend the reach of researchers to engage practitioners and end users of research?Motivating Change Workshop Behavioural Innovators Workshop Story Telling Workshop
    • 5. Issues with connecting research with research end users• Dry, theoretical, scientific jargon, stats• Driven by theoretical knowledge and publication and citation records• Common public and decision-makers rarely read scientific journals, research reports or attend academic seminars• Media only covers research findings if sensational• Conferences are one-time events held at one location 5
    • 6. Some key questions• Can we use social media to engage a larger audience for research?• Can we create a smarter way of attending a conference?• Can it act as an enduring, ‘living’ store of knowledge• Can it engage end users of research beyond the workshops and solicit feedback and engagement?• Can we use key decision makers and influencers to better transfer the message? 6
    • 7. The workshops 7
    • 8. Some outcomesCHALLENGES & GROUP IDEAS TO OVERCOME:Sea’s Challenge: Turning research into practice and measuring the impact • Research outcome evaluation toolAaron’s Challenge: Encouraging business to undertake more research • Lunches – elite/status element to them • Peer level – top down-peer level – bottom up • Give them tools to walk away withCarl’s Challenge: Collaboration between different researchers and end users of research • Council portal as a way of collecting community actionsCarolyn: Different partners’ needs • Sort your own needs & goals first • Do research and listen to the research – what people are saying • Engage and understand partner needs • What can each offer • Give each a role of autonomyScott: Finance 8 • Sharpen the message to investors
    • 9. Some outcomesDEVOLVE’N’SOLVE SESSION:Plenary Examples:Sandy (Business hat): people won’t adopt a product/service etc until it becomes a norm.  The barrier is that we needsomeone to really ‘sell’ the product/service until it becomes a norm.  This selling needs to also be consultative as well.Sea (Research, Policy hat):1 – it is everyone’s problem: scientists-funders-NGO’s-thinkers/doers.  They are all linked but we don’t understandeach other and instead throw rocks at (blame) each other.  Goal is to close the loop between the agents.2 – How can we use social media better (especially for professionals)?Lee (NGO hat): we all know the layers that need to happen, however they are all expensive and time consuming and noteveryone has the resources to do them all (or do them properly).  We don’t have a NZ hub where we all thread our bits ofknowledge, projects, learnings into.  9
    • 10. Some outcomesOffers and pledges put on the table: • Paul (NERI) – 1-year’s free membership to NERI (= access to capability map and resources on website etc) • Liana (Hikurangi) – can hold this space for a bit to keep the conversations going (which is an offer of our time, alumni & networks, facilitation).  • Sea (EECA) – funding for 1 more workshop.  Will continue with her master plan on demand-side research, IEA International best practice guide with end-user involvement, and 2 international conferences (will feedback to this group) • Amardeep (Midas) – will give midas institute website & forum for next 6-months and help understand what works and doesn’t work • Lee (WWF) – Treehouse as a meeting location for another workshop • Molly Melhuish – sailing lessons on Sundays (to really teach energy efficiency, functional technology, and to learn how to sail) • Diana (IUCN) – have a commission on education and communication.  There are two workshops coming up (in Auckland Jan 17th and Wellington Jan 18th) on strategising communication and sharing resources.  Email her for info.  ◦ Google ‘love not loss’ short video about communicating bio-diversity loss • Paul (ATLA) – opportunity to be involved with a community wind-farm (based in the Wellington region) • Richard Morrison (KCDC) – offered to do his eco design advisor consultancy job for whoever needs it 10
    • 11. Social Media Technologies used The consortium piloted social networking site LinkedIn and a website/blog/vlog that included media sharing as a way to initially trial reaction and participation
    • 12. The Blog & ForumThe Midas Institute blogged the entire workshop athttp://midasinstitute.org.nz/events/motivating-change-workshop/.The blogs included:•Full High Definition Video posting of the Presenter Sessions•Full High Definition Video posting of the Workshop Sessions•Blog posts from various participants including the Chief Executive of theEnergy Efficiency and Conservation Authority of New Zealand•Each posting had the relevant attachments and supporting documents(for example, the power points of the presentations).•Each posting could be: • Commented upon • Rated – based on a 5 star basis (with 5 stars being the highest) • The comments could also be further commented upon • It could be shared on various sites (for example, Twitter, Facebook and Digg).
    • 13. Findings – Reaching a wider Audience950% increase in participants Over 47% were repeat visitors77% of the visits were An average visitor visited 5+direct postings
    • 14. Findings – Reaching a wider Audience 13 additional countriesViewed in 46% attendees not from Wellington
    • 15. Findings of usefulness of social media√ Reached a wider audience√ Storage of knowledge√ Engaged the end users beyond the duration of the workshop? Solicit Feedback from the end users? Effectiveness of Key Opinion Leaders
    • 16. Findings• Some Qualitative and Intangible Findings are: – Use of Online Special Interest Group to link researchers with research end users – A wider mix of practitioners and end users than usually presented at such events – Interest in the creation of NZ motivating change community – Interest and input into future events – Pledges and offers of help
    • 17. Discussion – What went wellInterest in Participation Wider Engagement with the Research and Community groups Establishing Connections and Commitment
    • 18. Discussion – What else was learnt ? cultural issues in close societiesAre there in theiruse of social media? Language differsSocial Media fromResearch LanguageFostering engagement through ensuringtrust andkeeping the discussion professional
    • 19. Some feedback on use of social media “Its accessible, convenient to me, and stays on the web.” “It enables easy sharing of links to reference material.” “Being able to watch presentations again and pull out what I think are the key points.” “Can access at any time.”“The range of people there is potential to connect with.”“That there is more freedom for and less inhibition against putting forward and responding to wide ranging ideas.”“You can secretly stalk the questioners and respondents to inform your own knowledge of who is who and what their knowledge and views are.”“That you can quickly tap into global perspectives and comments.” “That it will make little difference to anything at all.” “That what turn out to be key ideas can get lost in the general volume of traffic generated.” “Limited shared learning of experiences and ideas - no "brainstrorming" potential.” “The interest fades and the discussion discontinues meaning the potential is not reached.” “The fear that my questions / comments will seem lame as everyone knows more than me!” “It significantly reduces the number of participants to those comfortable using that form of discussion.” “That my personal views are taken to reflect the views of my organisation.” “That I sound like an arse - I get something wrong or someone else contradicts or berates me.” 19
    • 20. Questions? sea.rotmann@eeca.govt.nz paul@neri.org.nz amardeep.sandhu@midasinfomedia.com 20

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