Revised I&C

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Innovation & Creativity presentation from TESOL international convention in Boston, March 2010.

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  • Pronounced: "cheek-sent-me-high-ee".
  • CESL Workshop, 2/5/10, Presented by Amy Schlessman, R.O.S.E. ®
  • CESL Workshop, 2/5/10, Presented by Amy Schlessman, R.O.S.E. ®
  • CESL Workshop, 2/5/10, Presented by Amy Schlessman, R.O.S.E. ®
  • CESL Workshop, 2/5/10, Presented by Amy Schlessman, R.O.S.E. ®
  • Definition of Commutative Property Commutative property is one of the basic properties of numbers. The word “commute” means “exchange” or “swap over”. Commutative property states that numbers can be added or multiplied in any order. That is: Commutative Property of Addition states that changing the order of addends does not change the sum. That is, a + b = b + a . Commutative Property of Multiplication states that changing the order of factors does not change the product. That is, a × b = b × a . Examples of Commutative Property 2 + 3 = 3 + 2. Whether you add 3 to 2 or 2 to 3, you get 5 both ways. 4 × 7 = 7 × 4. Whether you multiply 4 by 7 or 7 by 4, the product is the same, i.e. 28. Commutative Property in real-life Counting a combination of different coins reminds you of commutative property. Suppose you have 20 quarters and 10 dimes. It doesn’t matter whether you add the quarters first and then the dimes OR add the dimes first and then the quarters OR add a quarter and a dime alternately, finally the total is going to be $6 CESL Workshop, 2/5/10, Presented by Amy Schlessman, R.O.S.E. ®
  • CESL Workshop, 2/5/10, Presented by Amy Schlessman, R.O.S.E. ®
  • CESL Workshop, 2/5/10, Presented by Amy Schlessman, R.O.S.E. ®
  • CESL Workshop, 2/5/10, Presented by Amy Schlessman, R.O.S.E. ®
  • Re quest ion   Grets & regrets Gladly Luau Goes CESL Workshop, 2/5/10, Presented by Amy Schlessman, R.O.S.E. ®
  • CESL Workshop, 2/5/10, Presented by Amy Schlessman, R.O.S.E. ®
  • CESL Workshop, 2/5/10, Presented by Amy Schlessman, R.O.S.E. ®
  • CESL Workshop, 2/5/10, Presented by Amy Schlessman, R.O.S.E. ®
  • CESL Workshop, 2/5/10, Presented by Amy Schlessman, R.O.S.E. ®
  • The fog comes on little cat feet. It sits looking over harbor and city on silent haunches and then moves on. Carl Sandburg , Chicago Poems (1916) "Fog" US biographer & poet (1878 - 1967) CESL Workshop, 2/5/10, Presented by Amy Schlessman, R.O.S.E. ®
  • CESL Workshop, 2/5/10, Presented by Amy Schlessman, R.O.S.E. ®
  • CESL Workshop, 2/5/10, Presented by Amy Schlessman, R.O.S.E. ®
  • CESL Workshop, 2/5/10, Presented by Amy Schlessman, R.O.S.E. ®
  • Revised I&C

    1. 1. Innovation & Creativity In Multiple Intelligent Ways
    2. 2. Teaching creativity is a current topic, being covered in the press.
    3. 3. The animated version of this presentation will be available around April 1 (no foolin’!) on the R.O.S.E. website www.rosemanagement.com
    4. 4. Everyday Creativity Expressions of originality and meaningfulness: “ Everyday we use language to speak sentences that have never been spoken before. We express thoughts that have never been expressed. All of this is so deeply ingrained that we don’t notice how creative it is.” Art Markman, Tools for Innovation
    5. 5. Theoretical Background Constructivism Multiple Intelligences Epistemology
    6. 6. TESOL Scholarship … Creativity in the Language Classroom…
    7. 7. Innovation & Creativity Why? What? How ?
    8. 8. <ul><li>Palindromes (Symmetry) </li></ul><ul><li>Reversals </li></ul><ul><li>(re)Arrange </li></ul><ul><li>Similes/Analogies </li></ul><ul><li>Metaphors </li></ul>Abstractions © 2010 Rose Management Group
    9. 9. Identify the Principle © 2010 Rose Management Group
    10. 10. Palindromes
    11. 11. Palindromes (Symmetry) Definition Palindromes are meaningful units that are the same backward or forward. Example MOM or WOW 1221 Madam I’m Adam © 2010 Rose Management Group
    12. 12. Palindromes (Symmetry) ESL Examples Word Square http://www.fun-with-words.com/palindromes.html Minimal Pairs mam mem mim mom mum © 2010 Rose Management Group
    13. 13. Symmetry
    14. 14. Method-ical Innovation & Creativity is … © 2010 Rose Management Group
    15. 15. a + b + c = c + b + a Palindromes (Symmetry) Mathematical Natural © 2010 Rose Management Group
    16. 16. Reversals Definition Reversals make new meaningful units in the opposite direction. Example Palindromes - Semordnilap Drawer - Reward © 2010 Rose Management Group
    17. 17. Reversals ESL Example Word Order dog bit boy boy bit dog dog stressed god god desserts dog © 2010 Rose Management Group
    18. 18. Reversals Physical Musical © 2010 Rose Management Group
    19. 19. (re)Arrange Definition Recombine or expand the pieces of a meaningful unit into another meaningful unit. Example Anagrams The Eyes: They See © 2010 Rose Management Group Gladly Luau Goes
    20. 20. ESL Examples http://www.wordsmith.org/anagram/ (re)Arrange © 2010 Rose Management Group CREATIVE Reactive Cave Tire A Rice Vet Act Ever I INNOVATION Ovation Inn Van I Notion Vain I No Not Nova In It On
    21. 21. Musical (re)Arrange Visual © 2010 Rose Management Group
    22. 22. Similes /Analogies Definition Similes compare two meaningful units, often with “like” or “as”. Analogies compare two similes. Example Hungry like a wolf Hunger : Wolf :: Memory : Elephant © 2010 Rose Management Group
    23. 23. Similes /Analogies ESL Example As easy as pie: Very easy “ I thought you said this was a difficult problem. It isn’t. In fact, it’s as easy as pie.” http://www.eslcafe.com/idioms/id-a.html © 2010 Rose Management Group
    24. 24. Musical Similes /Analogies Visual © 2010 Rose Management Group Vivaldi’s The Four Seasons :“La Primavera” (Spring) Recorded by John Harrison – Violin, Robert Turizziani – Conductor (2000, February, 6).
    25. 25. Metaphors Definition Metaphors make two different meaningful units the same. Example Drowning in money Fog comes in on little cat feet © 2010 Rose Management Group
    26. 26. Metaphors ESL Example Be a piece of cake: Be very easy “ Bob said the test was difficult, but I thought it was a piece of cake.” http://www.eslcafe.com/idioms/id-b.html © 2010 Rose Management Group
    27. 27. Metaphors Physical Visual © 2010 Rose Management Group
    28. 28. Abstractions Game http://www.rosemanagement.com/Intro_DigIntoAbstractions.html
    29. 29. Everyday Creativity <ul><li>Students who practice everyday creativity tend to be </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Open-minded and curious </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Persistent </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Positive </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Energetic, and </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Intrinsically motivated. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Ivcevic </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Big C creativity little c creativity” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>- Craft 2000 & 2005 </li></ul></ul>
    30. 30. Creativity in Education <ul><li>Posing questions </li></ul><ul><li>Making connections </li></ul><ul><li>Being imaginative </li></ul><ul><li>Exploring options </li></ul><ul><li>Engaging in critical reflection/evaluation </li></ul><ul><li>Cremin, 2009 </li></ul>
    31. 31. Why is Creativity Important? <ul><li>Language use as a creative act </li></ul><ul><li>Compensation strategies </li></ul><ul><li>Source of motivation, challenge and inspiration </li></ul><ul><li>Developing self-esteem </li></ul><ul><li>Genuine communication and cooperation </li></ul><ul><li>Enriching classroom work by highlighting individual talents, ideas and thoughts (both learners’ and teacher’s) </li></ul><ul><li>Creative thinking as an important real - life skill </li></ul>
    32. 32. Creative English Teaching Practice <ul><li>Profiling meaning and purpose </li></ul><ul><li>Employing affectively engaging texts </li></ul><ul><li>Fostering play and engagement </li></ul><ul><li>Harnessing curiosity and profiling agency </li></ul><ul><li>Encouraging collaboration and making connections </li></ul><ul><li>Integrating review, reflection, feedback, and celebration </li></ul><ul><li>Taking time to explore </li></ul><ul><li>Ensuring creative involvement of the teacher </li></ul><ul><li>Adapted from Cremin, 2009 </li></ul>
    33. 33. How Can Educators “Kill” Creativity? <ul><li>Have children work for an expected reward </li></ul><ul><li>Set up competitive situations </li></ul><ul><li>Have children focus on expected evaluation </li></ul><ul><li>Use plenty surveillance </li></ul><ul><li>Set up restricted-choice situations </li></ul><ul><li>Hennessey and Amabile (1987) </li></ul>
    34. 34. Facilitating Creativity (Sternberg & Lubart, 1991) <ul><li>Intelligence </li></ul><ul><li>Knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>Intellectual style </li></ul><ul><li>Personality </li></ul><ul><li>Motivation </li></ul><ul><li>Environmental context </li></ul><ul><li>Two aspects of intelligence relevant to creativity: </li></ul><ul><li>problem definition and redefinition, and </li></ul><ul><li>insight skills. </li></ul>
    35. 35. Creativity and Academic Achievement <ul><li>Be aware of the many facets of creativity: verbal and written </li></ul><ul><li>( Creativity enters all curricular areas and disciplines ) </li></ul><ul><li>Encourage divergent learning activities </li></ul><ul><li>Be a resource provider and director </li></ul><ul><li>Listen and laugh with students </li></ul><ul><li>Allow students to have choices and be a part of the decision-making process </li></ul><ul><li>Let everyone get involved and support ideas and solutions to problems and projects </li></ul><ul><li>(Torrance, 1981, p. 32) </li></ul>
    36. 36. Creativity and Academic Achievement <ul><li>Support and reinforce unusual ideas and responses </li></ul><ul><li>Use failure as a positive and meet acceptable standards in a supportive atmosphere </li></ul><ul><li>Adapt to student interests and ideas </li></ul><ul><li>Allow time to think and develop creative ideas </li></ul><ul><li>( Not all creativity occurs immediately and spontaneously ) </li></ul><ul><li>Create a climate of mutual respect and acceptance so that students share, develop, and learn </li></ul><ul><li>(Torrance, 1981, p. 32) </li></ul>
    37. 37. ELT Materials for Creativity <ul><li>Exploit prior knowledge and experience </li></ul><ul><li>Provide opportunities for learner inventiveness </li></ul><ul><li>Additional challenges for highly motivated learners </li></ul><ul><li>Opportunities for learners to contribute </li></ul><ul><li>(Tomlinson, 2003) </li></ul>
    38. 38. U = Intelligence Conclusion © 2010 Rose Management Group Abstraction Trivia Master Creativity Innovation
    39. 39. Special thanks to Tim Bergeron & Dani Rexach for their help with the creation of this presentation.

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