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Imperialism part 2
 

Imperialism part 2

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    Imperialism part 2 Imperialism part 2 Presentation Transcript

    • Hawaii:
      "Crossroads
      of the
      Pacific"
    • U. S. Missionaries in Hawaii
      Imiola Church – first built in the late 1820s
    • U. S. View of Hawaiians
      Hawaii becomes a U. S. Protectorate in 1849 by virtue of economic treaties.
    • Hawaiian Queen Liliuokalani
      Hawaii for the Hawaiians!
    • U. S. Business Interests In Hawaii
      1875 – Reciprocity Treaty
      1890 – McKinley Tariff
      1893 –Americanbusinessmen backed anuprising against Queen Liliuokalani.
      Sanford Ballard Doleproclaims the Republic of Hawaii in 1894.
    • To The Victor Belongs the Spoils
      Hawaiian Annexation Ceremony, 1898
    • Japan
    • Commodore Matthew Perry Opens Up Japan: 1853
      The Japanese View of Commodore Perry
    • Treaty of Kanagawa: 1854
    • Gentleman’s Agreement: 1908
      A Japanese note agreeing to deny passports tolaborers entering the U.S.
      Japan recognized the U.S.right to exclude Japaneseimmigrants holding passportsissued by other countries.
      The U.S. government got theschool board of San Francisco to rescind their order tosegregate Asians in separateschools.
      1908  Root-Takahira Agreement.
    • Root-Takahira Agreement: 1908
      A pledge to maintain the status quo in the Far East.
      Recognition of China’s independence and territorial integrity, and support for continuation of the Open-Door Policy.
      An agreement to mutual consultation in the event of future Far Eastern crises.
    • Lodge Corollary to the Monroe Doctrine: 1912
      Senator Henry CabotLodge, Sr. (R-MA)
      Non-European powers,like Japan, would beexcluded from owningterritory in the WesternHemisphere.
    • Alaska
    • “Seward’s Folly”: 1867
      $7.2 million
    • “Seward’s Icebox”: 1867