Dpricedredscott
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Dpricedredscott Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Dred Scott—Free or Not?
  • 2. Some background:
    • Dred Scott
    • Born ~1799 in Virginia
    • Lived in Alabama, Missouri, Illinois & Wisconsin
    • Illiterate
    • Sues for freedom in 1846 in Missouri Circuit Court
  • 3.
    • Missouri Circuit Court finds against Scott
    • Scott appeals
    Scott & his wife, Harriet. Fort Snelling Fort Armstrong
  • 4. Next Step for Scott
    • Supreme Court rules that Scott is not a citizen.
    DRED SCOTT BORN ABOUT 1799 DIED SEPTEMBER 17, 1858. DRED SCOTT SUBJECT OF THE DECISION OF THE SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED STATES IN 1857 WHICH DENIED CITIZENSHIP TO THE NEGRO, VOIDED THE MISSOURI COMPROMISE ACT, BECAME ONE OF THE EVENTS THAT RESULTED IN THE CIVIL WAR. Photo by Stephanie Griest
  • 5. Timeline:
    • 1846-Scott’s first trial in St. Louis Circuit Court
    • 1847-Court rules in favor of his owner, Mrs. Emerson
    • 1850-Second trial, jury finds in favor of Scott
    • 1852-Mrs. Emerson appeals
    • 1852- Supreme Court of Missouri overrules Circuit Court
    • 1853 & 1854-Scott files in U.S. Federal Court—Scott v. Sanford
  • 6.
    • 1854-Court rules against Scott again
    • 1856 and 1857-Scott appeals to the U.S. Supreme Court
    Time Line Cont’d Taney’s Ruling: Negroes are not citizens of the United States and have no right to bring suit in Federal Court. Taney—… they had no rights which the white man was bound to respect.