Enterprise Architecture Frameworks<br />BICS - Week 5 Tutorial<br />Presented by Adrian Sharp<br />1<br />
FEAF (Federal Enterprise Architecture Framework)<br />ARCHITECTURE<br />PERSPECTIVE<br />(1)<br />2<br />
Key Features<br />Provides structure to develop, maintain and implement IT systems<br />Divides architecture into 3 levels...
ZACHMAN<br />(1)<br />4<br />
Key Features<br />What – Understanding of and dealing with an enterprises data<br />How – Translating mission of enterpris...
Participants roles<br />Planners (Scope) – Concerned with positioning the product in the context of its environment, inclu...
Opportunities presented<br />Becomes a bridge between business and technical domains  (2)<br />Improves consistency,  accu...
Challenges for an organization<br />Modeling – Requires significant time and effort to choose a suitable model/framework. ...
References<br />1. Chief Information Office Council 2001 ‘A Practical Guide to Federal Enterprise Architecture’, Federal A...
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Enterprise Architecture Frameworks

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Enterprise Architecture Frameworks

  1. 1. Enterprise Architecture Frameworks<br />BICS - Week 5 Tutorial<br />Presented by Adrian Sharp<br />1<br />
  2. 2. FEAF (Federal Enterprise Architecture Framework)<br />ARCHITECTURE<br />PERSPECTIVE<br />(1)<br />2<br />
  3. 3. Key Features<br />Provides structure to develop, maintain and implement IT systems<br />Divides architecture into 3 levels of description<br />Within each cell specification documents are suggested<br />Provides a listing of functional roles and associated responsibilities assigned to EA core team members<br />3<br />
  4. 4. ZACHMAN<br />(1)<br />4<br />
  5. 5. Key Features<br />What – Understanding of and dealing with an enterprises data<br />How – Translating mission of enterprise into more detailed definitions of operations<br />Where – Geographical distribution of enterprises activities<br />Who – Stakeholders involved in the business and in the introduction of new technology<br />When – Effects of time on the enterprise<br />Why – Translation of business goals and strategies into specific ends and means. (2)<br />5<br />
  6. 6. Participants roles<br />Planners (Scope) – Concerned with positioning the product in the context of its environment, including specifying its scope.<br />Business Owner’s (Enterprise Model) – Interested in the business deliverable and how it will be used<br />Designers (System Models) - Works with specifications for the product to ensure it will in fact fulfil the owners expectation<br />Builders (Technology Model) – Manages the process of assembling and fabricating the components in the production of the product<br />Subcontractors (Detailed representations) – Fabricates out of context components which meet the builders specifications.<br />6<br />
  7. 7. Opportunities presented<br />Becomes a bridge between business and technical domains (2)<br />Improves consistency, accuracy, timeliness, sharing of IT-managed information across the organization (1)<br />Enables integrated vision and global perspective of information resources (2)<br />Acts as way to pass from chaos and disagreement to order and structure (2)<br />7<br />
  8. 8. Challenges for an organization<br />Modeling – Requires significant time and effort to choose a suitable model/framework. <br />Management – Typically large organisation will have multiple ongoing projects that are renovating/replacing information systems as well as developing new ones. <br />Maintenance – Essential to an EA because operational consistency must be preserved while the organisation continues to evolve the architecture. <br />Security – System architects need to take into consideration the confidentially, integrity and availability of the systems and infrastructure. (4)<br />8<br />
  9. 9. References<br />1. Chief Information Office Council 2001 ‘A Practical Guide to Federal Enterprise Architecture’, Federal Architecture Working Group<br />2. Pereira, C & Sousa, P 2004 ‘A Method to Define an Enterprise Architecture using the Zachman Framework’ ACM Symposium on Applied Computing<br />3. Leist, S & Zellner, G 2006 ‘Evaluation of Current Architecture Frameworks’, Institute of Information Management, April, 23-27<br />4. Kaisler, S, Armour, F & Valivullah, M 2005 ‘Enterprise Architecting: Critical Problems’ Proceedings of the 38th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences <br />9<br />

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