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Roberts Rules Of Order 42610
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Roberts Rules Of Order 42610

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  • 1. Roberts Rules of Order
    A crash course
    1
  • 2. Who was Robert?
    U.S. Army Major Henry Martyn Robert (1837–1923 )
    Rules are based loosely on the rules of the U.S. House of Representatives
    2
  • 3. Robert’s Rules
    Robert’s Rules provide for fair and orderly meetings and promote the rights of:
    The majority to decide
    The minority to be heard
    Absent members to be protected
    3
  • 4. How formal should you be?
    The group should decide based on:
    The size of the group
    The purpose of the meeting
    Make the rules work for your organization
    Parliamentary law should be the servant, not the master, of the assembly.
     - Henry M. Robert Parliamentary Law, p. 151 
    4
  • 5. Hierarchy of Governing
    Organizations are governed by
    Applicable state and federal laws
    Organization’s Constitution
    Bylaws
    Parliamentary authority
    5
  • 6. Bylaws and Roberts Rules
    Bylaws are rules set by an organization to
    define the structure of an organization.
    describe the rights and responsibilities of members.
    describe the group's decision-making process.
    6
  • 7. Bylaws and Roberts Rules
    Bylaws
    Contains rules that cannot be suspended and cannot be changed at a single meeting
    Can be amended with previous notice and a two thirds vote.
    The faculty’s bylaws name Robert’s rules as our parliamentary authority.
    7
  • 8. Basic Rules
    All members are equal and have equal rights
    To attend meetings
    To make motions
    To debate
    8
  • 9. Meetings
    “People who enjoy meetings should not be in charge of anything.”
    Thomas Sowell
    9
  • 10. Roles of the officers
    Presiding Officer
    Calls the meeting to order
    Announces the business before the assembly
    Determines the presence of a quorum
    10
  • 11. Roles of Officers
    Presiding Officer
    Recognizes members entitled to the floor
    Processes motions
    Rules on points of order
    Conducts meetings in a fair and impartial manner
    11
  • 12. Roles of Officers
    Secretary
    Works with the president to prepare the agenda
    Distributes the agenda
    Keeps notes of what occurred at the meeting
    Prepares and distributes minutes
    12
  • 13. Role of Officers
    Parliamentarian
    Provides advice to the presiding officer on matters of procedure
    Has a duty to maintain a position of impartiality
    13
  • 14. Basic Rules
    A quorum must be present to do business
    If a quorum is not present the only business that can be conducted is
    To set the next meeting.
    To adjourn the meeting
    To recess the meeting
     
    14
  • 15. Agenda
    Roberts order of business:
    Reading and approval of minutes.
    Reports of officers and standing committees.
    Reports of ad hoc committees
    Unfinished business
    New business
    15
  • 16. Order of business
    If minutes have been sent to members, no need to read them.
    They can be approved by general consent
    16
  • 17. Order of business
    Reports from Committees
    If reports are distributed ahead of time, the presiding officer can simply ask if there are any additions. If not, the meeting can move on.
    “The ideal committee is one with me as the chairman, and two other members in bed with the flu”
    Lord Milverton
    17
  • 18. Order of business
    But -
    Any motions from a committee report should be taken up immediately.
    18
  • 19. Order of business
    Unfinished business
    Items on the agenda of the previous meeting that were postponed
    An item that was laid on the table at the current or previous meeting.
    19
  • 20. Motions
    A formal proposal by a member that the assembly take a certain action
    Business is brought before an assembly by the motion of a member
    Basic form is a main motion
    20
  • 21. Motions
    Member makes the motion
    Uses the word "move"
    21
  • 22. Motions
    Another member seconds the motion
    Not required for motions from committees which are considered seconded
    22
  • 23. Motions
    Prior to the chair stating the question, the motion can be amended
    By same maker, seconder must agree
    By another member, second is not necessary if maker accepts
    23
  • 24. Motions
    The chair "states the question"
    Ensures clarity by re-stating the motion
    Only the chair can place business before the assembly
    24
  • 25. Motions
    Once the question is stated, the motion is pending and open to debate
    At this point, the motion belongs to the assembly
    And only the assembly can modify it
    25
  • 26. Motions
    Maker of motion has the right to speak first
    Chair assigns floor
    26
  • 27. Debating Motions
    One question at a time and one speaker at a time.  
    The first person to seek recognition of the presiding officer should speak first
     
    27
  • 28. Debating Motions
    Comments should be directed to the chair.
    Avoid directing comments to other members.
    Avoid personal comments.
    Be courteous
    28
  • 29. Debating Motions
    Anyone who has not spoken gets recognized before anyone who has.
    It is good practice to alternate sides.
    No member may speak more than 2 times on a motion.
    Speeches limited to 10 minutes!
    29
  • 30. Debating Motions
    Main motions must receive full debate 
    To close debate
    • Move the previous question
    • 31. Move to end debate at a certain time
    or
    • Move to limit the length of speeches
    30
  • 32. Limiting Debate
    Motions to limit debate
    Require two thirds vote because they suspend the fundamental right of every member
    31
    “It is better to debate a question without settling it than to settle a question without debating it.”
    Joseph Joubert (1854-1824)
  • 33. Voting
    Voting
    General consent – “If there is no objection..”
    By voice, show of hands, rising vote, ballot , roll call
    32
  • 34. Voting
    If there is even one objection to a vote by unanimous consent, there must be a formal vote.
    33
  • 35. Voting
    Roberts says –
    a majority vote is a majority of voting members.
    34
    “Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.”
    Mark Twain
  • 36. Voting
    A majority is more than half. If the vote is a tie, the vote fails.
    35
  • 37. Voting
    Chair announces result
    "Carried," or "adopted"
    "Lost," or "rejected"
    36
  • 38. Motions
    Once a decision made, an identical motion must not be brought forward at the same meeting 
    37
  • 39. Types of Motions
    Main Motion
    Subsidiary Motions
    Incidental Motions
    38
  • 40. Motions
    Main motions
    Can be made only when no other motion is pending
    Only one main motion at a time
    39
  • 41. Subsidiary Motions
    Subsidiary motions help deal with the main motion
    40
  • 46. Incidental Motions
    Point of Order
    Are the rules being followed?
    Suspend the rules
    Does what you’re doing violate your own rules?
    Division of the question
    Can parts be voted on separately?
    41
  • 47. Mistakes to avoid
    Lay on the table vs. postpone to a certain time
    Call the question
    Friendly Amendment
    42
  • 48. Lay on the table
    The motion to lay on the table is used when you have sudden unexpected business to deal with.
    Needs a motion to bring back
    43
  • 49. Postpone to a certain time
    Used if more time is needed to make a decision
    Automatically comes up as an item of unfinished business at the next meeting
    44
  • 50. Call the question
    Speaker must be recognized by the chair
    Needs a second
    Requires a 2/3 vote
    45
  • 51. Friendly Amendment
    Who owns the motion?
    Once the chair states the motion and debate begins, the assembly owns the motion.
    Only the assembly can amend the motion through majority vote
    46
  • 52. Point of Order
    Any member may call a point of order when he believes someone is acting improperly
    Must happen when the violation occurs
    47
  • 53. Robert says ---
    a violation never challenged is never a violation.
    48
  • 54. Can’t Remember the Rules?
    Ask yourself ---
    What is the fairest thing to do to protect the rights of all members?
    Roberts Rules promote fairness
    49
  • 55. Can’t Remember the Rules?
    What is the most logical thing to do to solve the problem?
    Roberts Rules are very logical
    50
  • 56. Can’t Remember the Rules?
    What is the most efficient thing to do to accomplish the groups goals?
    Roberts rules promote efficiency
    51
  • 57. Sources
    Kline, Charles. ROBERT, HENRY MARTYN (1837–1923). The handbook of Texas online. http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/RR/fro96.html
    Robert, H.M. (1981). Robert’s Rules of Order Newly Revised. Glenview, IL: Scott, Foresman and Company.
    Sylvester, N. (2004) . The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Robert’s Rules. New York, NY: Alpha.
    52