Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
PhD_eLearning_stylebook_Jan_2013
PhD_eLearning_stylebook_Jan_2013
PhD_eLearning_stylebook_Jan_2013
PhD_eLearning_stylebook_Jan_2013
PhD_eLearning_stylebook_Jan_2013
PhD_eLearning_stylebook_Jan_2013
PhD_eLearning_stylebook_Jan_2013
PhD_eLearning_stylebook_Jan_2013
PhD_eLearning_stylebook_Jan_2013
PhD_eLearning_stylebook_Jan_2013
PhD_eLearning_stylebook_Jan_2013
PhD_eLearning_stylebook_Jan_2013
PhD_eLearning_stylebook_Jan_2013
PhD_eLearning_stylebook_Jan_2013
PhD_eLearning_stylebook_Jan_2013
PhD_eLearning_stylebook_Jan_2013
PhD_eLearning_stylebook_Jan_2013
PhD_eLearning_stylebook_Jan_2013
PhD_eLearning_stylebook_Jan_2013
PhD_eLearning_stylebook_Jan_2013
PhD_eLearning_stylebook_Jan_2013
PhD_eLearning_stylebook_Jan_2013
PhD_eLearning_stylebook_Jan_2013
PhD_eLearning_stylebook_Jan_2013
PhD_eLearning_stylebook_Jan_2013
PhD_eLearning_stylebook_Jan_2013
PhD_eLearning_stylebook_Jan_2013
PhD_eLearning_stylebook_Jan_2013
PhD_eLearning_stylebook_Jan_2013
PhD_eLearning_stylebook_Jan_2013
PhD_eLearning_stylebook_Jan_2013
PhD_eLearning_stylebook_Jan_2013
PhD_eLearning_stylebook_Jan_2013
PhD_eLearning_stylebook_Jan_2013
PhD_eLearning_stylebook_Jan_2013
PhD_eLearning_stylebook_Jan_2013
PhD_eLearning_stylebook_Jan_2013
PhD_eLearning_stylebook_Jan_2013
PhD_eLearning_stylebook_Jan_2013
PhD_eLearning_stylebook_Jan_2013
PhD_eLearning_stylebook_Jan_2013
PhD_eLearning_stylebook_Jan_2013
PhD_eLearning_stylebook_Jan_2013
PhD_eLearning_stylebook_Jan_2013
PhD_eLearning_stylebook_Jan_2013
PhD_eLearning_stylebook_Jan_2013
PhD_eLearning_stylebook_Jan_2013
PhD_eLearning_stylebook_Jan_2013
PhD_eLearning_stylebook_Jan_2013
PhD_eLearning_stylebook_Jan_2013
PhD_eLearning_stylebook_Jan_2013
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

PhD_eLearning_stylebook_Jan_2013

420

Published on

Based on National Qualifications Framework for Higher Education of Thailand, this Doctor of Philosophy in eLearning Methodology (PhDeLM) is a Plan 1.1 research degree program requiring students to …

Based on National Qualifications Framework for Higher Education of Thailand, this Doctor of Philosophy in eLearning Methodology (PhDeLM) is a Plan 1.1 research degree program requiring students to take no coursework but register for 48 credits for research work to complete their dissertation. This Stylebook comprise of two main chapters.This chapter includes the details about three phases of study. Chapter-2 covers the Stylebook which provided details of formats of documents, reports and
dissertation in order to help all students to have uniformity in writing the manuscripts.

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
420
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
12
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Assumption University of Thailand Graduate School of eLearning (GSeL) AU-GSeL Stylebook Ph.D. in eLearning Methodology Ph.D. in eLearning Methodology Program 2013
  • 2. TABLE OF CONTENTS Table of Contents ............................................................................................................i List of Tables ............................................................................................................... iii List of Figures ...............................................................................................................iv Chapter I PhDeLM: 3-Year Plan of Study..................................................................... 1 Phase 1: Development of Documentary Research.............................................. 3 Components of Documentary Research ......................................................... 5 Phase 2: Development of Proposal ..................................................................... 8 Components of the Research Proposal ........................................................... 8 Phase 3: Development of Dissertation................................................................ 9 Components of the Dissertation.................................................................... .11 Chapter II Layout and Format of Documents ............................................................. 15 Setting up the Documents ................................................................................. 15 Components of the Documents..................................................................... 16 Part 1: Preliminary Section ............................................................................... 16 1. Cover Page................................................................................................ 16 2. Approval Page .......................................................................................... 16 3. Copyright Page ......................................................................................... 16 4. Abstract..................................................................................................... 17 5. Acknowledgement .................................................................................... 17 6. Table of Contents...................................................................................... 17 7. List of Tables/ List of Figures .................................................................. 17 Part 2: Body of Contents................................................................................... 17 1. Table ......................................................................................................... 18
  • 3. 2. Figure ........................................................................................................ 19 3. Handling In-text Citation .......................................................................... 19 4. References List and Format ...................................................................... 23 4.1. Print Sources ...................................................................................... 23 4.2. Electronic Sources ............................................................................. 27 5. Quotation .................................................................................................. 31 5.1 Sample of short quotation:.................................................................. 31 5.2 Sample of block quotation: ................................................................. 31 6. Appendices ............................................................................................... 31 References.................................................................................................................... 32 Appendix 1: Cover Page of a Documentary Research ......................... 34 Appendix 2: Cover Page of a Research Proposal ................................. 35 Appendix 3: Cover Page of a Dissertation ........................................... 36 Appendix 4: Approval Page of DR, RP and Dissertation..................... 37 Appendix 5: Copyright Page ................................................................ 38 Appendix 6: Abstract ............................................................................ 39 Appendix 7: Acknowledgement ........................................................... 40 Appendix 8: Table of Contents............................................................. 41 Appendix 9: List of Tables ................................................................... 42 Appendix 10: List of Figures ................................................................ 43 Appendix 11: Body of Contents ........................................................... 44 Appendix 12: Bio-data.......................................................................... 45 ii
  • 4. LIST OF TABLES Table 1: Chapter Format for Dissertation ............................................................. 10 Table 2: The Number of Employees at ABC Company in the Past Three Years. 19 iii
  • 5. LIST OF FIGURES Figure 1: Three-year study plan of PhDeLM ......................................................... 2 Figure 2: The Number of Employees in 2004 Categorized by Department ......... 19 iv
  • 6. CHAPTER I PHDELM: 3-YEAR PLAN OF STUDY Based on National Qualifications Framework for Higher Education of Thailand, this Doctor of Philosophy in eLearning Methodology (PhDeLM) is a Plan 1.1 research degree program requiring students to take no coursework but register for 48 credits for research work to complete their dissertation. This Stylebook comprise of two main chapters. This chapter includes the details about three phases of study. Chapter-2 covers the Stylebook which provided details of formats of documents, reports and dissertation in order to help all students to have uniformity in writing the manuscripts. Figure 1 given below depicts the 3-Year study plan of PhDeLM. As per this plan all students are required to prepare documents for each of the following examinations: Phase 1: Documentary Research (DR) for Qualifying Examination Phase 2: Proposal for Proposal Defense Phase 3: Dissertation for Final Dissertation Defense All the three documents use the reference style prescribed by American Psychological Association (APA5th). However, each document has its own purposes and components as described in the next section.
  • 7. Figure 1: Three-year study plan of PhDeLM 2
  • 8. Phase 1: Development of Documentary Research The Phase 1 begins with the application process for the PhDeLM program. Along with the required transcripts the applicants must submit a preliminary research concept paper for the purposes of interview and admission to the program. After the admission to the PhDeLm program students are required to submit a revised concept paper to get approval of a dissertation topic from the program director. The revised concept paper is NOTE as it creates a foundation for the Documentary Research (DR) in the area chosen for study. The keywords in the title or the topic will become the basis for the documentary research. The concept paper would normally include at least four components: 1) Title / Topic / Issue relevance to eLearning Methodology 2) Objectives of the research, 3) Expected outcome of the research 4) Details of the research planning which may include target groups, variables, methodology, data collections and analysis. The concept paper should not exceed more than 2 pages. It is crucial to emphasize that the purpose of the documentary research is to the create a better foundation for your work by learning more about current eLearning technologies, software applications, content development tools, delivery systems or issues specifically related to your area of research. The main objective of documentary research is to ensure that all PhDeLM students gather relevant information through literature review to get a better understanding of the vast domain of eLearning. In other words, the documentary research allows the researcher to explore all crucial knowledge such as concepts, theories, principles and technologies to be qualified for conducting research in proposed topic or area. Detail information on each keyword included in the proposed title or topic should be derived from available books, journals, library resources including dissertation/ thesis and various internet repositories and search engines. In order to develop a documentary research, PhDeLM students should follow the below steps. 3
  • 9. 1) Select a topic for your documentary research. Please note that the title of your documentary research may exactly the same as final dissertation topic. The title of documentary research is usually broader than the final dissertation title or topic. 2) Submit the documentary research outline based on keywords of the approved title to your Academic Advisor/Academic Co-advisor. The documentary research proposal must contain the title of the documentary research and a brief synopsis. 3) Outline or create concept mapping of the approved research topic. 4) Develop Section 1 Introduction of the documentary research based on the proposed format given in Chapter 2. 5) Collect contents and data for each key word by either reviewing related literature, interviewing experts and authorities in the topic, joining study visits or getting involved in national and international seminars and conferences in the field; 6) Develop the Section 2 onwards of the Documentary Research (Not less than three Sections based on ACPO Model) A-Advance Organizer (definition, history, type, uses, advantages) C-Concurrent Organizer (approaches, methods, steps, case studies) P-Post Organizer (summary, applications, future trends) 7) Each key word of the title or topic should be explored and constitute a separate section of your documentary research 8) Develop final Section X containing Summary, Lessons Learned, Discussion, Recommendation related to the topic of Each “key word” should constitute a separate section of your documentary research 9) The final Section should consist of Conclusion, Discussion, Recommendation related to your topic 10) Qualifying Exam- Defend the documentary research NOTE: Documentary research is a required document for the Qualifying Examination (QE). All students must submit Documentary research two weeks in 4
  • 10. advanced before the date of Qualifying Examination. Normally, after the Qualifying Examination the Documentary research may be modified further based on examination committees’ recommendations. The revised Documentary research will have to be resubmitted to the program before going to the Phase-2. The contents of Documentary research will later be used to create Literature Review chapter of the proposal, the second phase of the PhDeLM program. Components of Documentary Research CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION 1. Background Information 2. Objectives of the Documentary research 1) 2) 3) 3. Research Questions of the Documentary research 1) 2) 3) 4. Research Hypothesis of the Documentary research (if any) 1) 2) 3) 5. Methodology/Plan of Actions of the Documentary research 1) Identify Sources of Data and Information: (1) Source of Literature/Documents (2) Identify Experts (3) List the Venues/locations for Fieldtrips/Study Visits/Handon Experiences 5
  • 11. 2) Review of Keywords to Answer Research Question1-Research Questionn from Documents 3) Review of Keywords to Answer Hypothesis1-Hypothesisn from Documents (if any) 4) Review of Expert’s Opinions (if any) 5) Review of Field Trips/Study Visits/Hand-on Experiences (if any) 6. Definitions of Terms Please use the following pattern: e.g. Attitude: An enduring disposition to respond consistently in a given manner to various aspects of the world, including persons, events, and objects (Zikmund, 1994). 7. Concept Mapping A concept map is a form of graphic organizer that represents topics of all information together; the diagram should show the relationships among all concepts of the Documentary Research. The concept map will outline sub-topics that will be investigated and presented in Section 2 onward. 8. Expected Outcomes 1) 2) 3) CHAPTER II INFORMATION ON RESEARCH QUESTION-11 1. The Concept 2. Definition 3. Historical Development 4. Format and Types 5. Procedures/Steps 6. Advantages and Disadvantages 1 Tentative sub-topics to be reviewed from literature, documents and research 6
  • 12. 7. Implication to Daily Use CHAPTER III INFORMATION ON RESEARCH QUESTION -2 1. The Concept 2. Definition 3. Historical Development 4. Format and Types 5. Procedures/Steps 6. Advantages and Disadvantages 7. Implication to Daily Use CHAPTER IV INFORMATION ON RESEARCH QUESTION -3 1. The Concept 2. Definition 3. Historical Development 4. Format and Types 5. Procedures/Steps 6. Advantages and Disadvantages 7. Implication to Daily Use CHAPTER V DATA ANALYSIS AND LESSONS LEARNED -Analysis of Documents -Analysis of Expert Opinions -Analysis of Field Trips/Study Visits/Hand-on Experiences -Lessons Learned CHAPTER VI CONCLUSION, DISCUSSION AND RECOMMENDATIONS Conclusion -Summary of the Study -Major Findings Discussion Recommendations 7
  • 13. -On Application of Research Findings -On Further Research REFERENCES All citations included in DR in APA 5th style APPENDICES All data collection tools such as questionnaires and survey forms Phase 2: Development of Proposal The Research Proposal (RP) is a document that the candidates need to submit for the Phase-2, the Proposal Defense (PD). It is also the next step in creating the PhDeLM dissertation. General idea of the research proposal is to explain why the research topic is important. What gap in the literature the proposed research is filling? Students should develop the Research Proposal to concisely present his/her for new research proposal. The Research Proposal should include details of the recent work done by other researchers, and what important questions still remain unanswered. Then it might need to include the new information that the researcher will seek, the materials to be used, the equipment needed, the methodology, observations and measurements to be made and how the data will be analyzed. Components of the Research Proposal CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION - Background of the Study - Statement of Problem - Research Objectives - Research Questions - Significance of Research - Definitions of Terms - Limitation of Research - Organization of Research Chapters 8
  • 14. CHAPTER II LITERATURE REVIEW - A scholarly review of earlier work relevant to the concerned topic providing appropriate history and recognizing the priority of the work of others - Conceptual Framework - Research Hypotheses CHAPTER III RESEARCH METHODOLOGY - Research Design - Target Population and Sample - Research Instruments and methodology of research instruments construction, criteria of research instruments standard - Proposed Data Collection, Data Processing and Analysis REFERENCES All citations included in the proposal in APA 5th style APPENDICES All data-collection tools such as the draft questionnaires and the draft survey forms NOTE: The Research Proposal need to be submitted two weeks in advanced before the date of Proposal Defense. Proposal Defense document may be modified based on examination committees’ comments. The revised Research Proposal will have to be resubmitted to the program before going to the Phase-3, the final phase of the program. The Research Proposal will be used for conduct the research and re-develop to be a dissertation. Phase 3: Development of Dissertation The Dissertation is a document that the candidate need to submit for the Phase-3, final dissertation defense. The PhD candidates will conduct research based on approval proposal covered in Phase-1 and Phase-2. The recommended format of the 9
  • 15. Dissertation is the 5-6 chapters, depending on the types of research. The chapter format is outlined in the following Table. Table 1: Chapter Format for Dissertation 1) R&D Research Six-chapter Format 2) Other Type of Research Five-chapter Format Chapter I Introduction Chapter I Introduction Chapter II Review of Literature Chapter II Review of Literature Chapter III Research Methodology or Development Methodology Chapter III Research Methodology Chapter IV Data Analysis & Results Chapter IV Data Analysis & Results Chapter V The R&D Prototype/s Chapter V Conclusion2, Discussion & Recommendation Chapter VI Conclusion, Discussion & Recommendation References References Appendices Appendices Bio-data Bio-data All Ph.D. candidates are recommended to work closely with their advisor/s for the content for each chapter of the final dissertation. The presentation of dissertation contents depends on the type of the selected research depicted in the Table 1-1. All five to six chapters (six chapters for an R&D) must be completed before the final defense of the Dissertation. Please note that contents of Chapter 1-3 created for Research Proposal will be used as part of the final dissertation. Depending upon the type of research depicted in the Table 1-1 the final dissertation should cover the following topics. 2 Conclusion = Summary and Major Findings 10
  • 16. Components of the Dissertation CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION Chapter I the “Introduction” covers the background of study, statement of the problem, research objectives, research questions and or hypotheses, significance of the study, definition of terms, and the organization of the remaining chapters. The sub-topics of the Chapter 1 may be as follows: - Background of Study - Statement of Problem - Research Objectives - Research Questions/Hypotheses - Significance of Research - Definition of Terms - Organization of the remaining chapters CHAPTER II REVIEW OF LITERATURE Chapter II “Review of Literature” begins with a brief preamble followed by an extensive review of the literature pertaining to the keywords and topics both directly and indirectly related to the research studies. The review of the literature may include the work from various sources, such as, previous research studies, books, journals, seminar materials, conference reports, Research and Dissertation reports, web sites, etc. This chapter should cover all writings relevant to the study. Also, each study cited in this chapter should contain the name of the researcher/s and a description of the research methodology as well as finding and conclusions. The sub-topics of the Chapter II may be as follows: - Review of Literature on Keyword (1) - Review of Literature on Keyword (2) - Review of Literature on Keyword (3) - Review of Literature on Keyword (4) - Reviews of major related Research Findings - Conceptual Framework 11
  • 17. - Research Hypotheses CHAPTER III RESEARCH METHODOLOGY Chapter III “Research Methodology” should contain detail presentation of the method/s or procedure/s that will be used in the study. This chapter must describe all the steps taken in conducting the research, such as, the general procedures, design of the study, the instrument/s used, collection of the data, treatment of the data, and the summary. Students must explain the methodology used in a very clear way and concise way. If a method is quantitative, the selected statistical techniques should be described and the rationale for its use will be given. If the method is qualitative, i.e., a case study, it should describe all the supporting documentation used and details pertaining to the collection of the data will be identified in a descriptive narrative. A thorough explanation of the procedure used for data analysis is necessary for both methods. Chapter 3 must include an adequate amount of detail in all sub-topics. The sub-topics of the Chapter 3 may be as follows: General Procedures Design of the Study Population and Sampling Research Instrument Development Methodology 1. Research Instrument (1) Step 1 Step 2 Step 3 and so on 2. Research Instrument (2) Step 1 Step 2 Step 3 and so on 3. Research Instrument (X) Content Validity Reliability (if any) 12
  • 18. Collection of the Data Proposed Data Processing and Analysis CHAPTER IV DATA ANALYSIS AND RESULTS This chapter reports the findings from data analysis. The researcher have to think of the most effective and appropriate method of presenting data, such as graphs, tables, diagrams and pictures, etc. For quantitative research, this chapter must include statistical data, whereas in qualitative research it may include narrative documentation of the findings. The sub-topics of the Chapter 4 may be as follows: Acronym lists Population and Samples Descriptive data analysis Testing of the Hypotheses (if any) Hypothesis 1 Hypothesis 2 Hypothesis 3 Answers to research questions (if any) Research Question 1 Research Question 2 Research Question 3 Supplemental Data (if any) CHAPTER V SUMMARY, MAJOR FINDINGS, DISCUSSION, AND RECOMMENDATIONS Chapter 5 includes a summary of the entire report. It should cover findings, followed by conclusions, discussions, implications and recommendations for further study. It should state whether the findings are compatible with any of the previous research studies. The recommendation for further study of the research topic is also very important. In conclusion, this chapter should cover the significance and contributions made from the findings of the study. The details of the Chapter 5 may be as follows: 13
  • 19. Summary of the Study Major Findings Discussion Recommendations NOTE: The complete dissertation need to be submitted two weeks in advanced before the date of a dissertation final defense. The dissertation might be modified further based on the examination committees’ comments. The revised dissertation will have to be resubmitted to the program to complete the final phase of the program of graduation. The final recommendations of the examination committees’ will use for awarding the Ph.D. degree to the candidate/s. 14
  • 20. CHAPTER II LAYOUT AND FORMAT OF DOCUMENTS Setting up the Documents This section describes detail of document lay out which include: page size, margins, fonts, spacing and pagination. 1. Page size Print on one side of standard-sized (A4) white bond paper. 2. Margins One-inch margins at the top, bottom, and on the right -One and a half inch on the left. -Tab set at 0.3 inch” (Clear all) 3. Fonts -Main text: Regular Times New Roman: font size 12 pt -Chapter: 14 pt/bold/centered/uppercase -Title of Chapter: 14 pt/bold/centered/uppercase -Sub-Chapter: 14 pt/bold, centered, no numbering (if any) -First Heading (Far left): 14 pt/bold, numbering: 1. -Second Heading (first tab): 12 pt/bold, numbering 1.1 -Third Heading (second tab): 12 pt/bold/italic, numbering 1.1.1 -Forth Heading (third tab): 12 pt/italic, numbering: 1) -Fifth Heading (Fourth tab): 12 pt/regular, numbering: (1) -Page number: 10 pt/regular centered, bottom of the page 4. Spacing Double spacing is required throughout the paper (every line of the title, headings, quotations, references). 5. Pagination The page number will be located at the center on the bottom of the page in the preliminary part, except the first page of each section and chapter, the first page of reference, and the first page of each appendix. After copyright page in preliminary part, Roman numeral (i, ii, iii...) is used up to the Abstract page. 15
  • 21. Begin using Arabic numerals on center started at the body of contents, references and appendices section. Components of the Documents The documents such as documentary research, research proposal and dissertation consist of four parts: (1) Preliminary Section, (2) Body of Contents, (3) References and (4) Appendices. Part 1: Preliminary Section The details and samples of preliminary part include cover page, approval page, copyright page, abstract, acknowledgement, table of contents, and list of tables/list of figures. Students must follow the formats and order of preliminary part accordingly. Details for each page are following. 1. Cover Page The format of cover page is applied to all types of documents. The Cover Page shows the title of the university, school, topics of the document, name of students, types of documents such as a documentary research, a research proposal or a dissertation, code of courses, degrees, month and year of submission. Text Font is Time New Roman, 16 pt/ bold, Align Center, Double Line spacing (See Appendix) 2. Approval Page The format of approval page is applied to all types of documents. This page certifies that the committee has examined the final copies of the document on the form and content acceptable for final submission. The signatures of all committee members are required before examination. Text Font is Time New Roman, 12 pt Double Line spacing (See Appendix). 3. Copyright Page The copyright page will be presented in the final copy of dissertation only. This page shows Assumption University’s Copyright and year. Text Font is Time New Roman, 16 pt/ bold, Align Center both horizontal and vertical, Double Line spacing (See Appendix). 16
  • 22. 4. Abstract The abstract will be added in the dissertation only. The abstract is a synopsis of the contents of study, no more than 350 words in total. It consists of a short statement concerning the area of investigation, a brief discussion of methods and procedures used in gathering data. A concise summary of the findings and conclusions should also be presented. Text Font is Time New Roman, 12 pt, Double or 1.5 Lines spacing to keep the abstract in one page (See Appendix). 5. Acknowledgement The acknowledgement will be presented in the final copy of dissertation only. This page is used to thank those, individual or organization, who have contributed and helped all through the process of completing the dissertation. Though there are no set limits or the number of pages, this section typically does not exceed two pages. Title places at center of page, font Time New Roman, 16 pt, contents use font Time New Roman, 12 pt, regular double line spacing (See Appendix). 6. Table of Contents The format of table of contents is applied to all types of documents. Table of Contents must include section titles and chapters, references, and appendices. Page number for each section must be specified. Title places at center of page, font Time New Roman, 16 pt, contents use font Time New Roman, 12 pt, regular Double line spacing (See Appendix). 7. List of Tables/ List of Figures The format of List of Tables/ List of Figures is applied to all types of documents. The table/figure number and title must be illustrated. Page number where each table located must be presented. Similar to table of contents page, title places at center of page font Time New Roman, 16 pt, contents use font Time New Roman, 12 pt, regular double line spacing (See Appendix). Part 2: Body of Contents The body of contents of the documents includes many types of information. Detailed information concerning the format of body of contents are provided as follows: 17
  • 23. The title of the Chapter is all upper case and centered with one double-space. 1. The first line of the body of the paper (in 12 pt/bold) appears one double-space below the title. 2. For consistency, all new paragraph starts with a tab indent of 0.3” spaces. The default settings (0.5”) in most word-processing programs are acceptable, but it takes more spaces especially if many tabs are employed. 3. The Heading 1, in 14 pt/bold, is located at the left margin with the numbering 1 2 3 4 5 …... 4. The Heading 2, in 12 pt/bold, is at the one tab indent of 0.3 spaces. 5. The Heading 3, in 12 pt/bold and italic, is at two tabs indent. 6. The Heading 4, in 12 pt/regular is at two tabs indent. 7. The Heading 5, in 12 pt/italic, is at two tabs indent. Please kindly observe the example of contents’ order with numbering system in the Appendix. 1. Table Table consists of the tabulate columns. The table heading must be on the top of the table. The table must also include three horizontal lines: (1) First line- the opening line after the table title and before the banner heading; (2) Second line-the banner heading closing line to separate the headings from the main body of the table; (3) Third line-the table closing line. Use ½ pt black line for all lines in the table. The banner heads (horizontal row in bold font) contain the caption for the columns of the table whereas the subheads (vertical row) are in regular font. The footnotes for extended explanation and the source of table may be presented. The word “Table and Numbering” is in 10 pt/bold. The word “Source” is in bold and italic. The sample of a table is presented below: 18
  • 24. Table 2: The Number of Employees at ABC Company in the Past Three Years Department/Year 2002 2003 2004 Marketing 20 24 30 Production 100 120 150 10 12 15 ….. Human Resource Source: Human Resource Management ABC Company (2005) 2. Figure Figures are visual materials such as photographs, maps, or drawings. The figure should be located at the center of the page. The figure legend, in 10 pt/regular, is at the center of the page below the figure. The word “Figure and Numbering” is in 10 pt/ bold/ italic. The sample of a figure is presented below: Figure 2: The Number of Employees in 2004 Categorized by Department Source: Jackson (2005) 3. Handling In-text Citation This section introduces the style of referencing as set out in the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (5th ed.). The APA system of citing sources indicates the author's last name and the date, in parentheses, within the text of paper. Students who need to ensure that the dissertation conforms exactly to the APA format then the best way is to check the Publication Manual, which is a large reference book that contains hundreds of guidelines on how to format references, statistics, tables, punctuation and grammar. It also contains writing tips and instructions about how to format manuscripts (learn more at 19
  • 25. http://www.apastyle.org/index.html). PhDeLm students also can access to the eBook of Writing in APA style at http://www.southernoceansoftware.com/apamacros/index.html. 3.1. A typical citation of an entire work consists of the author's name and the year of publication. Example: Charlotte and Emily Bronte were polar opposites, not only in their personalities but in their sources of inspiration for writing (Taylor, 1990). Use the last name only in both first and subsequent citations, except when there is more than one author with the same last name. In that case, use the last name and the first initial. 3.2. If the author is named in the text, only the year is cited. Example: According to Irene Taylor (1990), the personalities of Charlotte. . . 3.3. If both the name of the author and the date are used in the text, parenthetical reference is not necessary. Example: In a 1989 article, Gould explains Darwin's most successful. . . 3.4. Specific citations of pages or chapters follow the year. Example: Emily Bronte "expressed increasing hostility for the world of human relationships, whether sexual or social" (Taylor, 1988, p. 11). 20
  • 26. 3.5. When the reference is to a work by two authors, cite both names each time the reference appears. Example: Sexual-selection theory often has been used to explore patters of various insect mating (Alcock & Thornhill, 1983) . . . Alcock and Thornhill (1983) also demonstrate. . . 3.6. When the reference is to a work by three to five authors, cite all the authors the first time the reference appears. In a subsequent reference, use the first author's last name followed by et al. (meaning "and others"). Example of a subsequent reference: Patterns of byzantine intrigue have long plagued the internal politics of community college administration in Texas (Douglas et al., 1997) 3.7. When the reference is to a work by six or more authors, use only the first author's name followed et al. in the first and all subsequent reference. The only exceptions to this rule are when some confusion might result because of similar names or the same author being cited. In that case, cite enough authors so that the distinction is clear. 3.8. When the reference is to a work by a corporate author, use the name of the organization as the author. Example: Retired officers retain access to all of the university's educational and recreational facilities (Columbia University, 1987, p. 54). 21
  • 27. 3.9. Personal letters, telephone calls, and other material that cannot be retrieved are not listed in References but are cited in the text. Example: Jesse Moore (telephone conversation, April 17, 1989) confirmed that the ideas. . . 3.10. Parenthetical references may mention more than one work, particularly when ideas have been summarized after drawing from several sources. Multiple citations should be arranged as follows. Examples: 1. List two or more works by the same author in order of the date of publication: (Gould, 1987, 1989) 2. Differentiate works by the same author and with the same publication date by adding an identifying letter to each date: (Bloom, 1987a, 1987b) 3. List works by different authors in alphabetical order by last name, and use semicolons to separate the references: (Gould, 1989; Smith, 1983; Tutwiler, 1989). 3.11. Electronic sources that do not provide page numbers. For electronic sources that do not provide page numbers, use the paragraph number, if available, proceeded by the abbreviation "para." Example: (Myers, 2000, para. 5). If neither paragraph nor page numbers are provided, direct the reader to the location of the referenced material by indicating the heading that precedes the material and, counting down from that heading, the number of the paragraph containing the material. Example: (Beutler, 2000, "Conclusion" section, para. 1). 3.12. Documents not indicating the name of the author. 22
  • 28. If an document does not indicate the name of the author(s), refer to the document by repeating the first few words of its title. Example: (Study finds, 2001). If the information being referred to appear on an untitled Web page, indicate in the text of your paper where the reader is to look if he or she wishes to find a full reference to the web site that contains that page. 4. References List and Format The List of References begins on a new page. The word “References” in 14 pt/bold is located at center top of the page. You must double-space all reference entries. The second line of each reference entry is indented about half an inch (hanging indent style) and single line space is applied. Students must place a list of cited sources, arranged alphabetically, after the research contents section, but before the appendices section. This manual provides list of reference samples frequently used such as print sources and electronic sources. For more information please read Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association 5th (2002). 4.1. Print Sources 4.1.1. Non-Periodicals (eg. Books, Reports, Brochures, or Audiovisual media) Basic Format: Author, A. A. (Year of publication). Title of work: Capital letter also for subtitle. Location: Publisher. Examples: Arnheim, R. (1971). Art and visual perception. Berkeley: University of California Press. American Psychiatric Association. (1994). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (4th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. Nicol, A. A. M., & Pexman, P. M. (1999). Presenting your findings: A practical guide for creating tables. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association. 23
  • 29. Publishing information - Spell out the publishing names of associations and university presses, but omit superfluous terms such as "Publishers," "Co.," or "Inc." If two or more locations are given, give the location listed first or the publisher's home office. When the publisher is a university and the name of the state (or province) is included in the university name, do not repeat the name of the state/province in the publisher location. When the author and publisher are identical, use the word "Author" as the name of the publisher. 4.1.2. An Article in a Periodical (e.g., a journal, newspaper, or magazine) Basic Format: Author, A. A., Author, B. B., & Author, C. C. (Year, add month and day of publication for daily, weekly, or monthly publications). Title of article. Title of periodical, volume number (issue), pages. Examples: Magazine articles Monson, M. (1993, September 16). Urbana firm obstacle to office project. The Champaign-Urbana News-Gazette, pp. A1-A8. Journal articles Parsons, W. (1967). Predictive validities of the ACT, SAT, and high school grades for first semester GPA and freshman courses. Educational and Psychological Measurement, 27, 1143-1144. Sawyer, J. (1966). Measurement and prediction, clinical and statistical. Psychological Bulletin, 66 (3), 178-200. Monthly periodicals Chandler-Crisp, S. (1988, May) "Aerobic writing": a writing practice model. Writing Lab Newsletter, pp. 9-11. Weekly periodicals Kauffmann, S. (1993, October 18). On films: class consciousness. The New Republic, p.30. 24
  • 30. Remark: Students need list only the volume number if the periodical uses continuous pagination throughout a particular volume. If each issue begins with page 1, it should list the issue number as well: Title of Periodical, Volume number (Issue number), pages. Note that the issue number is not italicized. If the periodical does not use volume numbers, include "pp." before the page numbers so the reader will understand that the numbers refer to pagination. Use "p." if the source is a page or less long. 4.1.3. Part of a Non-Periodical (e.g., a book chapter or an article in a collection) Basic Format: Author, A. A., & Author, B. B. (Year of publication). Title of chapter. in A. Editor & B. Editor (Eds.), Title of book (pages of chapter). Location: Publisher. Examples: Rubenstein, J.P. (1967). The effect of television violence on small children. In B.F. Kane (Ed.), Television and juvenile psychological development (pp. 112-134). New York: American Psychological Society. REMARK: When you list the pages of the chapter or essay in parentheses after the book title, use "pp." before the numbers: (pp. 1-21). 4.1.4. An Entry in an Encyclopedia Basic Format: Author, A. A., & Author, B. B. (Year of publication). Title of chapter. in Title of encyclopedia (vol. Page no.(s)). Location: Publisher. Example: Boy scouts of America (1969). In Funk & wagnalls new encyclopedia (Vol. 4, pp. 163-165). New York: Funk & Wagnalls. For an encyclopedia article on CD-ROM, use this form: 25
  • 31. Abolitionist movement [CD-ROM]. (1996). Compton's interactive encyclopedia. New York: Softkey Multimedia. 4.1.5. A Translated Work Basic Format: Author, A. A., Author, B. B., & Author, C. C. (Year of Publication) Title of work (A. Translator & B. Translator, Trans.). Location: Publisher. (Original work published year) Examples: Freud, S. (1970) An outline of psychoanalysis (J. Strachey, Trans.). New York: Norton. (Original work published 1940) Note: When students cite this work in text, it should appear with both dates: Freud (1940/1970). 4.1.6. A Government Publication Basic Format: Organization. (Year of Publication). Title of article: Subtitle if any (Publication Information). Location: Publisher Example: National Institute of Mental Health. (1982). Television and behavior: Ten years of scientific progress (DHHS Publication No. A 82-1195). Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office. 4.1.7. Work Discussed in a Secondary Source Coltheart, M., Curtis, B., Atkins, P., & Haller, M. (1993). Models of reading aloud:Dual-route and parallel-distributed-processing approaches. Psychological Review, 100, 589-608. Note: Give the secondary source in the references list; in the text, name the original work, and give a citation for the secondary source. For example, if Seidenberg and 26
  • 32. McClelland's work is cited in Coltheart et al. and you did not read the original work, list the Coltheart et al. reference in the References. In the text, use the following citation: In Seidenberg and McClelland's study (as cited in Coltheart, Curtis, Atkins, & Haller, 1993), ... 4.2. Electronic Sources APA suggests that writers citing Web items refer to specific Web site documents rather than to home or menu pages. APA also advises writers to strive to provide addresses (URLs) that are typed correctly and that work. Continually check the references to Web documents; if the addresses of any of those documents change, update the references before submit the paper. Moreover, avoid dividing an electronic address at the end of a line. If absolutely necessary, divide it at a slash (/) or before a period. Although it might seem more logical to divide it after a period, APA style specifically states before a period. If an Internet document is undated, insert "(n.d.)" immediately after the document title. E-mail messages may be cited in the text, but APA warns against listing them in the "References" section because such messages are unrecoverable. All references must be double spaced and have a hanging indent i.e. the second and all following lines in a reference must be indented 5-7 spaces in from the first line. 4.2.1. A Non-Periodical Internet Document (e.g., a Web page or report) Basic Format: Author, A. A., & Author, B. B. (Date of publication). Title of article. Retrieved month date, year, from http://Web address Examples: Gordon, C. H., Simmons, P., & Wynn, G. (2001). Plagiarism: What it is, and how to avoid it. Retrieved July 24, 2001, from Biology Program Guide 2001/2002 at the University of British Columbia Web site: http://www.zoology.ubc.ca/bpg/plagiarism.htm 27
  • 33. Greater Hattiesburg Civic Awareness Group, Task Force on Sheltered Programs. (n.d.). Fund-raising efforts. Retrieved November 10, 2001, from http://www.hattiesburgcag.org GVU's 8th WWW user survey. (n.d.). Retrieved August 8, 2000, from http://www.cc.gatech.edu/gvu/user_surveys/survey-1997-10/ University of California, San Francisco, Institute for Health and Aging. (1996, November). Chronic care in America: A 21st century challenge. Retrieved September 9, 2000, from the Robert Wood Foundation Web site: http://www.rwjf.org/library/chrcare NOTE: 1) When an Internet document is more than one Web page, provide a URL that links to the home page or entry page for the document. Also, if there isn't a date available for the document use (n.d.) for no date. 2) If the article was retrieved from university program or department insert the name of the program or department after ‘Retrieved month day, year from’ then follow the name with a colon before the web address. 4.2.2. Part of Nonperiodical Internet Document Basic Format: Author, A. A., & Author, B. B. (Date of publication). Title of article. In Title of book or larger document (chapter or section number). Retrieved from http://Web address. Schneiderman, R. A. (1997). Librarians can make sense of the Net. San Antonio Business Journal, 11, 58+. Retrieved January 27, 1999, from EBSCO Masterfile database. 4.2.3. Periodical Internet Document Basic Format: Author, A. A., & Author, B. B. (Date of publication). Title of article. Title of journal, volume number (issue number if available). Retrieved month day, year, from http://Web address 28
  • 34. Examples: Hilts, P. J. (1999, February 16). In forecasting their emotions, most people flunk out. New York Times. Retrieved November 21, 2000, from http://www.nytimes.com Jensen, S. (2000). Ethical underpinnings for multidisciplinary practice in the United States and abroad: Are accounting firms and law firms really different? Online Journal of Ethics, 3 (1). Retrieved August 20, 2001, from http://www.stthom.edu/cbes/ethunder.html 4.2.4. Chapter or Section of an Online Document Basic Format: Author, A. A., & Author, B. B. (Date of publication). Title of article. In Title of book or larger document (chapter or section number). Retrieved Month Day, Year, from: http://web address Example: Burroughs, E. R. (1922). Beauty and the beast. In The monster men (Chap. 3). Retrieved July 13, 2001, from: http://www.southernoceansoftware.com/text2html/Contents.html 4.2.5. Message Posted to an Online Forum or Discussion Group or Newsgroup Basic Format: Author(s). (Date of posting). Message subject line [Message ID]. Message posted to [group address] Example: Hammond, T. (2000, November 20). YAHC: Handle Parameters, DOI Genres, etc. Message posted to Ref-Links electronic mailing list, archived at http://www.doi.org/mail-archive/ref-link/msg00088.html Weylman, C. R. (2001, September 4). Make news to achieve positive press [Msg. 98]. Message posted to http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sales-marketingtips/message/98 29
  • 35. Yudkin, M. (2001, July 4). The marketing minute: Truth is always in season [Msg. ID: ruf6kt0aiu5eui6523qsrofhu70h21evoj@4ax.com]. Message posted to news://biz.ecommerce 4.2.6. Internet Government Report Basic Format: Sponsoring agency. (Date). Title. (Publication data). Retrieved [date] from [name of organization and URL] Examples: U.S. General Accounting Office. (1997, February). Telemedicine: Federal strategy is needed to guide investments. (Publication No. GAO/NSAID/HEHS-97-67). Retrieved September 15, 2000, from General Accounting Office Reports Online via GPA Access: http://www.access.gpo.gov/su_docs/aces/aces160.shtml?/gao/index.html 4.2.7. Journal Article from Database Basic Format Author, A. A., & Author, B. B. (Date of publication). Title of article. Title of journal, volume number (issue number if available) page(s). Retrieved month day, year, from database name, Article No. if available. Examples: Schneiderman, R. A. (1997). Librarians can make sense of the Net. San Antonio Business Journal, 11, 58+. Retrieved January 27, 1999, from EBSCO Masterfile database. Blackburn-Brockman, E. & Belanger, K. (2001, January). One page or two? A national study of CPA recruiters' preferences for resume length. The Journal of Business Communication, 38 (1), 29. Retrieved June 20, 2001, from InfoTrac College Edition database, Article No. A71327300. 30
  • 36. 5. Quotation When students quote the exact words of a source, they must provide a page number. For a short quotation (fewer than 40 words), they must incorporate the quotation into the text and enclose the quotation with double quotation marks (“…”). If the quotation contains 40 words or more, students must present the information in a separate block quotation. The block quotation, in 12 pt/regular, must be started on a new line and indented about one tab (0.3 inches) the entire quotation should be singlespaced. In case a part of the text from the source is quoted, you must begin the block with three dots (…) before the quoted texts. At the end of the quotation, end it with four dots (….) or a period (.) The citation must be placed at the end of the quotation. 5.1 Sample of short quotation: The Ministry of Education also pointed out “Teachers and educational personnel are the major components of educational inputs since you play a vital role in transferring knowledge to the learners.” (Office of the National Education Commission, 2002, p. 19). 5.2 Sample of block quotation: The existing School Net project is being expanded to connect schools with the Internet. At present, approximately 60 percent of our secondary schools are provided with computers that are connected to the Internet. The Ministry of Education is still developing the infrastructure to make full use of information and communication technology (ICT) networks among schools in Thailand. (Office of the National Education Commission, 2002, p. 27) 6. Appendices This section may include the documentation that provides an in depth understanding of the research study but not easily fit into the main body. Examples of the documentation include questionnaires, letters, field notes, statistical data, etc. The appendix 1, 2, 3, ... may be presented in the format as in the appendices. 31
  • 37. REFERENCES the American Psychological Association. (2002). Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.
  • 38. APPENDICES 33
  • 39. Appendix 1: Cover Page of a Documentary Research Assumption University of Thailand Graduate School of eLearning (GSeL) Time New Roman 16 PT, bold, 2 double line spacing TOPIC OF DOCUMENT… … 1 double line spacing By FIRST NAME LAST NAME 1 double line spacing A Documentary Research for EL9001-9003 Dissertation 1-3 Submitted in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy in eLearning Methodology Month Year 34
  • 40. Appendix 2: Cover Page of a Research Proposal Assumption University of Thailand Graduate School of eLearning (GSeL) Time New Roman 16 PT, bold, 2 double line spacing TOPIC OF DOCUMENT… … 1 double line spacing By FIRST NAME LAST NAME 1 double line spacing A Research Proposal for EL9004-9006 Dissertation 4-6 Submitted in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy in eLearning Methodology Month Year 35
  • 41. Appendix 3: Cover Page of a Dissertation Assumption University of Thailand Graduate School of eLearning (GSeL) Time New Roman 16 PT, bold, 2 double line spacing TOPIC OF DOCUMENT… … 1 double line spacing By FIRST NAME LAST NAME 2 double line spacing A Dissertation Submitted in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy in eLearning Methodology Month Year 36
  • 42. Appendix 4: Approval Page of DR, RP and Dissertation Topic of Document… ….. Time New Roman 12 PT, bold single line spacing By First name Middle name (if any) Last name 1 single line spacing A name of document: i.e. Documentary Research, Research Proposal or Dissertation Submitted to the Graduate Degree Program in eLearning Methodology, Graduate School of eLearning, Assumption University of Thailand in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy 3 single line spacing (Prof. Dr. First name Last name) Chairperson (Prof. Dr. First name Last name) Advisor (Prof. Dr. First name Last name) Co-advisor (Prof. Dr. First name Last name) Committee Member (Prof. Dr. First name Last name) CHE Representative (only dissertation) (Prof. Dr. First name Last name) Dean, Graduate School of eLearning Date of Examination: (Date/ Month/ Year) 37
  • 43. Appendix 5: Copyright Page Time New Roman 16 PT, bold, 1 double line spacing Copyright Assumption University of Thailand Year 38
  • 44. Appendix 6: Abstract DISSERTATION TITLE IN CAPITAL LETTERS IN TIMES NEW ROMAN 12 POINTS USING DOUBLE LINE OR 1.5 LINES SPACING TO KEEP THE ABSTRACT IN ONE PAGE Researcher: First Name Last Name; Advisors: Prof. /Assoc./ Asst./ Dr./First Name Last Name, Prof. /Assoc./ Asst./ Dr./First Name Last Name; Degree: Doctor of Philosophy in eLearning Methodology; Graduate School of eLearning, Assumption University of Thailand, Year. ABSTRACT (Objectives) The objectives of this study were (1) to………, (2) to……., (3) to ……, and (4) to…….. (Methodology) This is a (……..research etc.). The population was (specify the whole population of the setting as stated in the Title). The samples were ……using (name the sampling technique). The data collecting instruments were (specify the type(s) of instruments, i.e. questionnaires, interview forms, etc.). The data were analyzed using (name the statistical methods such as percentile, means, t-test etc.)… (Major Findings) The findings were as follows: 1) On (type the keyword for the first objective/Research Question), it was found that (1)… ….; (2)… ….; (3)… ….; and (4)… …. 2) On testing First hypotheses, it was found that (1)… ….; (2)… ….; (3)… ….; and (4)… …. Keywords: 39
  • 45. Appendix 7: Acknowledgement ACKNOWLEDGEMENT (The purpose of the Acknowledgement is for students to express their gratitude to those who had given helping hands and moral supports during conduction of research until it’s successfully accomplished. Students might be recommended to express acknowledgement to their parents, advisors, colleagues and others and the Devine powers that believe in for their distribution to the success of the works.) First name Last Name 40
  • 46. Appendix 8: Table of Contents TABLE OF CONTENTS Abstract......................................................................................................... i Acknowledgement ........................................................................................ ii Table of Contents.......................................................................................... iii List of Tables ................................................................................................ v List of Figures .............................................................................................. vi Chapter I Title ........................................................................................... 1 Heading 1 ............................................................................................... 2 Heading 2 ........................................................................................ 3 Heading 3 .............................................................................. 4 Chapter II Title ......................................................................................... 7 Heading 1 ............................................................................................... 8 Heading 2 ........................................................................................ 9 Heading 3 ............................................................................ 10 References ................................................................................................... 16 Appendices ................................................................................................ 20 Appendix 1 ............................................................................................ 21 Appendix 2 ............................................................................................ 22 Appendix 3 ............................................................................................ 23 Appendix 4 ............................................................................................ 24 41
  • 47. Appendix 9: List of Tables LIST OF TABLES Page Table 1: Title ................................................................................................ 20 Table 2: Title ................................................................................................ 65 Table 3: Title ................................................................................................ 68 Table 4: Title ................................................................................................ 71 Table 5: Title ................................................................................................ 84 Table 6: Title .............................................................................................. 114 42
  • 48. Appendix 10: List of Figures LIST OF FIGURES Page Figure 1: Title .............................................................................................. 22 Figure 2: Title .............................................................................................. 67 Figure 3: Title .............................................................................................. 69 Figure 4: Title .............................................................................................. 75 Figure 5: Title .............................................................................................. 89 Figure 6: Title ............................................................................................ 117 43
  • 49. Appendix 11: Body of Contents CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION (14 pt/bold) Tab=0.3 inch Sub-chapter (14 pt/bold/centered) If any 1. Heading 1 (14 pt/bold) Tab=0.3 inch 1.1 Heading 2 (12 pt/bold) Tab=0.3 inch 1.1.1 Heading 3 (12 pt/bold/italic) Tab=0.3 inch 1) Heading 4 (12 pt/regular) Tab=0.3 inch (1) Heading 5 (12 pt/italic) Tab=0.3 inch 1 (Page number 10 pt/regular/centered) 44
  • 50. Appendix 12: Bio-data Bio-data Bio-data contains brief information of the researcher. It is required to appear on the last page of the dissertation containing the following information: Name of Researcher: Educational Background: 1) Secondary School 2) Bachelor’s Degree and Major: 3) Others (Certificate, Master’s Degree) Employment: Present Position Past Experiences (List only three most recent ones) Special Talents and Interests (If any) 45

×