Clark Higgins Remember To Repeat

878 views
797 views

Published on

Brain Research - LTCY 199 - Summer 2009 - Remember to Repeat

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
878
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
10
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Clark Higgins Remember To Repeat

  1. 1. Remember to Repeat<br />By: Clark Higgins<br />
  2. 2. A memory storage system<br />Unlimited capacity<br />A few weeks to an entire life span<br />(Warren, 1997)<br />Long-term Memory<br />
  3. 3. Memories of procedures, skills, and “how to”<br />Slow to acquire, but hard to lose<br />Repetition develops memory<br /><ul><li>Examples 1. Tying your shoe’s strings </li></ul> 2. Riding a bike<br /> 3. Practicing a musical instrument<br />(Farndon, 2003)<br />Non-Declarative Memory<br />
  4. 4. Two types: Episodic and Semantic<br />Storage of facts<br /><ul><li>Examples 1. First car</li></ul> 2. Birthday<br />(Farndon, 2003)<br />Declarative Memory<br />
  5. 5. Episodic <br />Striking experiences<br />Sensations<br /><ul><li>Examples</li></ul>Breaking your arm<br />First real date<br />(Farndon, 2003)<br />Semantic<br />Dates<br /><ul><li>Examples</li></ul>1.Christmas Day<br />2. Your mother’s birthday<br />Episodic and Semantic Memories<br />
  6. 6. Short-term memory to long-term memory through the hippocampus<br />Shape of a seahorse<br />Makes the long-term memories, but doesn’t store them<br />If both hippocampi are destroyed, then you can never learn anything new<br />(Dongier, 2002)<br />Hippocampus<br />
  7. 7. New facts or memories are remembered by running them through the hippocampus many times over.<br />Repeating<br />Mnemonic devices<br />(Dongier, 2002)<br />Remember to Repeat<br />
  8. 8. These memories are not lost, instead are misplaced<br />Memories that have been restored did not form new forebrain neurons. <br />These neurons just grew new connections to the others.<br />This rewiring will bring back lost memories.<br />(Shay, 2007)<br />Lost Memories<br />
  9. 9. Memories are divided up and stored in many regions inside the brain.<br />Memories make up the connections between neurons<br />This is why a smell might trigger an old memory <br />Storage of Memories<br />
  10. 10. The process in which we find information in our long-term memory, then transfer it back to the working memory<br />We retrieve these long-term memories triggered by the new information, then store both of them together.<br />Two types: recall and recognize <br />(Wagner, 2005)<br />Retrieval of Memories<br />
  11. 11. Retrieval methods<br />Recall<br />Recognition<br />We get information from our memory without seeing the memory.<br /><ul><li>Example </li></ul> A short answer question.<br />(Wagner,2005)<br />Revolves around recognizing the information after seeing it before.<br /><ul><li>Example</li></ul> A quiz where you choose one of the choices to be the correct one.<br />
  12. 12. Warren, S. (1997). Remember this: Memory and the brain. Retrieved July 8, 2009, from Serendip Web site: http://serendip.brynmawr.edu/biology/b103/f97/projects97/Warren.html<br />Farndon, J. (2003). 1000 Things you should know about the human body. (p. 61). Essex, United Kingdom: Miles Kelly Publishing.<br />Shay, S. (2007, July). Memories misplaced, not lost. New Insight into Alzheimer’s, 110(4), 3-4. Retrieved from MasterFILE Premier database.<br />Dongier, M. (2002). Long-term memory. Retrieved July 8, 2009, from The Brain from Top to Bottom Web site: http://thebrain.mcgill.ca/flash/d/d_07/d_07_cr/d_07_cr_tra/d_07_cr_tra.html<br />Wagner, K. (2005).Memory Retrieval. Retrieved July 10, 2009, from About.com Psychology Web site: http://psychology.about.com/od/cognitivepsychology/a/memory_retrival.htm<br />Reference Page<br />

×