Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
birds
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

birds

1,398

Published on

Published in: Lifestyle, Technology, Sports
0 Comments
3 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,398
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
71
Comments
0
Likes
3
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. BIRDS
    Prepared by: Diana Rose Dimapasoc
  • 2. Birds(class Aves) are winged, bipedal, endothermic (warm-blooded), egg-laying, vertebrate animals.
  • 3. Modern birds are characterized by feathers, a beak with no teeth, the laying of hard-shelled eggs, a high metabolic rate, a four-chambered heart, and a lightweight but strong skeleton.
  • 4. Feathers, Plumage and Scales
    • Feathers are a feature characteristic of birds . They facilitate flight, provide insulation that aids in thermoregulation, and are used in display, camouflage, and signaling.
    • Plumage is regularly molted; the standard plumage of a bird that has molted after breeding is known as the "non-breeding" plumage.
    • The scales of birds are composed of the same keratin as beaks, claws, and spurs. They are found mainly on the toes and metatarsus, but may be found further up on the ankle in some birds. Most bird scales do not overlap significantly, except in the cases of kingfishersand woodpeckers. The scales of birds are thought to be homologous to those of reptiles and mammals.
  • Behavior
    • Most birds are diurnal, but some birds, such as many species of owlsand nightjars, are nocturnal or crepuscular (active during twilight hours), and many coastal waders feed when the tides are appropriate, by day or night
  • Diet and Feeding
    • Birds' diets are varied and often include nectar, fruit, plants, seeds, carrion, and various small animals, including other birds. Because birds have no teeth, their digestive system is adapted to process unmasticated food items that are swallowed whole.
  • Water and Drinking
    • Water is needed by many birds although their mode of excretion and lack of sweat glands reduces the physiological demands. Some desert birds can obtain their water needs entirely from moisture in their food. They may also have other adaptations such as allowing their body temperature to rise, saving on moisture loss from evaporative cooling or panting. Seabirds can drink seawater and have salt glands inside the head that eliminate excess salt out of the nostrils. Most birds scoop water in their beaks and raise their head to let water run down the throat. Some species, especially of arid zones, belonging to the pigeon, finch, moosebird, button-quail and bustard families are capable of sucking up water without the need to tilt back their heads. Some desert birds depend on water sources and sand grouse are particularly well-known for their daily congregations at waterholes. Nesting sand grouse carry water to their young by wetting their belly feathers.
  • Migration
    • Many bird species migrate to take advantage of global differences of seasonal temperatures, therefore optimizing availability of food sources and breeding habitat. These migrations vary among the different groups. Many landbirds, shorebirds, and waterbirds undertake annual long distance migrations, usually triggered by the length of daylight as well as weather conditions. These birds are characterized by a breeding season spent in the temperate or arctic/ Antarctic regions and a non-breeding season in the tropical regions or opposite hemisphere. Before migration, birds substantially increase body fats and reserves and reduce the size of some of their organs.
  • Communication
    Birds communicateusing primarily visual and auditory signals. Signals can be interspecific (between species) and intraspecific (within species).
    Birds sometimes use plumage to assess and assert social dominance, to display breeding condition in sexually selected species, or to make threatening displays, as in the Sunbittern's mimicry of a large predator to ward off hawks and protect young chicks. Variation in plumage also allows for the identification of birds, particularly between species. Visual communication among birds may also involve ritualized displays, which have developed from non-signalling actions such as preening, the adjustments of feather position, pecking, or other behavior. These displays may signal aggression or submission or may contribute to the formation of pair-bonds. The most elaborate displays occur during courtship, where "dances" are often formed from complex combinations of many possible component movements; males' breeding success may depend on the quality of such displays.
  • 5. Many birds, like this American Flamingo, tuck their head into their back when sleeping.
  • 6. Bird Types
    cockatoo
    cockatiel
    canary
  • 7. conure
    finches
    dove
  • 8. Love birds
    lory
    Macaw bird
  • 9. Peacock
    Sparrow
  • 10. I hope you love birds too. It is economical. It saves going to heaven.
    Emily DickinsonUS poet (1830 - 1886)
    t.y.

×