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Medical and clinical communication using Email
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Medical and clinical communication using Email

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Use of email between doctors and patients …

Use of email between doctors and patients
Some guidelines

Published in: Health & Medicine, Business

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  • 1. Guidelines for Clinical Use of Electronic Mail with Patients
  • 2.
    • Medical communication between Patient-Doctor is considered privileged, and demands strict confidentiality.
    Features of medical communication- 1) Effective interaction between the clinician and patient, 2) Observance of medicolegal prudence
  • 3. Advantages of using e-mail
    • Accelerates communication of the written word.
    • Allows communication any time of day.
    • Does not need the attention of both parties at the same time.
  • 4. Advantages…
    • Provides a mechanism for sending the same health education information simultaneously to many patients,
    • Is simple, convenient and inexpensive to use,
    • Enables physicians to direct patients to health information on the Internet.
  • 5. Informed consent for use of e-mail.
    • Guidelines.
    • * Provide instructions for when and how to escalate to phone calls and office visits.
    • * Describe security mechanisms in place.
    • * Indemnify the health care institution for information loss due to technical failures.
    • * Waive encryption requirement, if any, at patient's insistence.
  • 6. Practical implications -
    • Patients to put their name and patient identification number in the body of the message.
    • Print all messages, with replies and confirmation of receipt, and place in patient's paper chart.
  • 7. Categorize emails
    • Patients to put category of transaction in subject line of message for filtering:
    • eg.
    • “ prescription,”
    • “ appointment,”
    • “ medical advice,”
    • “ billing question”.
  • 8. Security
    • Never forward patient-identifiable information to a third party without the patient's express permission.
    • Do not share professional e-mail accounts with family members.
    • Do not use unencrypted wireless communications with patient-identifiable information.
    • Perform at least weekly backups of mail onto long-term storage.
  • 9.
    • Do not use e-mail for urgent matters .
    • Both parties to use Auto-reply tool to confirm
    • receipt of message.
    • Maintain a mailing list of patients, but
    • Do not send group mailings where recipients
    • are visible to each other.
    • Use blind copy feature in software.
  • 10.
    • http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC61279/?tool= pubmed
    • https://www.amia.org/mbrcenter/pubs/email_guidelines.asp
    Soul Thang Composed by: Scott P. Schreer, Stephen A. Love.
  • 11. Dr.Neelesh Bhandari MBBS, MD (Path.) Sr. Advisor (Medical communications) edrneelesh Digital-medicine.blogspot.com