Vitamine D(sunshine vitamin) update
• Vitamin D is a group of fat-soluble secosteroids (similar to a steroid but  with a "broken" ring).• For historical and e...
HISTORY• ln 1918, Sir Edward Mellanby demonstrated that the disease  rickets was caused by a nutritional deficiency by cur...
SOURCE
SOURCES OF VITAMIN D• The major source of vitamin D for most  humans is exposure to sunlight .• Few foods naturally contai...
DAILY RECOMMENDED DOSE
SYNTHESIS
• Vitamin D synthesis peaks at wavelengths between 295 and  297 nm (UV index greater than 3) and satisfactory amounts of  ...
• Initially, it was thought that liver and kidneys were the only  organs responsible for the production of 1,25-(OH)2D.• H...
• Like other neurosteroids (i.e. oestrogen) 1,25-(OH)2D is  believed to act via two types of receptors:•      (i) The nucl...
• The classical actions of vitamin D start with binding to the  VDR.• which, in turn, hetero-dimerises with nuclear recept...
•   1,25-(OH)2D binds to its nuclear    receptor (VDR)•   Hetero dimerisation with RXR,•   The 1,25D/VDR/RXR complex    re...
• 1,25-(OH)2D bind to its  membrane receptor  (MARRS).• Regulates the activity of  adenylate cyclase,  phospholipase C (PL...
VITAMIN D AND THE NERVOUS SYSTEM• Vitamin D receptors (VDR) are widely distributed throughout  the embryonic brain promine...
• Vitamin D has been shown to be neuro-protective, notably by  inducing the synthesis of Ca2+-binding proteins, such as  p...
VITAMIN D AND THE IMMUNE SYSTEM• It has been shown that diminished vitamin D (i) induces  immune-mediated symptoms in anim...
• Vitamin D has also been reported to   – (i) up-regulate IL-4 (Cantorna et al., 1998) and IL-10     (Correale et al., 200...
VITAMIN D AND MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS• Approximately 15-20% of MS patients have a family history  of MS and studies in twins in...
• Goldberg was the first to link sunlight and dietary factors to  the epidemiology of MS (Goldberg et al., 1986).• He prom...
Some of the evidences are:• Latitude variations.   The disease is virtually unknown in equatorial regions and  there is an...
• Season of birth.  There is evidence in many areas that MS has seasonality of birth  (Leibowitz et al., 1968; Suther-land...
Some of the proposed theories• 1. Vitamin D induces naive CD4+ T to differentiate into  regulatory T cells producing IL-10...
• 3. There is an increased number of osteopontin transcripts are  also found in the brain of MS patients .• Osteopontin (i...
• 5. HLA-DRB1*1501 is the major locus determining genetic  sus-ceptibility for MS (ref). Attractively, it has been shown  ...
Vit. D in other brain diseases                 Parkinsons disease• The substantia nigra is the area of the human brain whe...
• Confirmatively, a significant higher prevalence of  hypovitaminosis D was observed in patients with Parkinsons  dis-ease...
Vit. D and Epilepsy• Kalueffs team has demonstrated that vitamin D plays an anti-  convulsive role in an epilepsy animal m...
Vit.D and Depression• In a very large study involving more than 1000 older adults,  mean levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D wer...
Vit D deficiency• No one is immune to vit. D deficiency.• Most common causes are   – 1. excess skin pigmentation   Melanin...
• Age: -• Aging is associated with decreased concentrations of 7-  dehydrocholesterol, the precursor of vitamin D3 in the ...
Nonskeletal Consequences Of Vitamin D                  Deficiency• In the 1980s and 1990s, several observations suggested ...
CONCLUSION• Vitamin D exhibits all the main characteristics of a true  neuroactive steroid.• We highlighted few previously...
Vitamine d(sunshine vitamin) update
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Vitamine d(sunshine vitamin) update

  1. 1. Vitamine D(sunshine vitamin) update
  2. 2. • Vitamin D is a group of fat-soluble secosteroids (similar to a steroid but with a "broken" ring).• For historical and epidemiological reasons, vitamin D has been classified as a vitamin. However its synthesis from precursor molecules actually begins in skin cells.• It is now being reconsidered as a genuine steroid hormone with a multifaceted function.
  3. 3. HISTORY• ln 1918, Sir Edward Mellanby demonstrated that the disease rickets was caused by a nutritional deficiency by curing rachitic infants with cod liver oil.• 1,25-(OH)2D (1 ,25-dihydroxyvitamin D) the active compound was isolated by McCollum in 1922 and named it Vit.D.• Hess, Smith and steenbock in 1924 confirmed that sunlight is the source of the vitamin D.• R.B. Woodward awarded noble prize for artificial synthesis of the Vitamin in 1965.
  4. 4. SOURCE
  5. 5. SOURCES OF VITAMIN D• The major source of vitamin D for most humans is exposure to sunlight .• Few foods naturally contain vitamin D, including oily fish such as salmon, mackerel, and herring and oils from fish, including cod liver oil.
  6. 6. DAILY RECOMMENDED DOSE
  7. 7. SYNTHESIS
  8. 8. • Vitamin D synthesis peaks at wavelengths between 295 and 297 nm (UV index greater than 3) and satisfactory amounts of vitamin D are produced after 15 min of sun exposure, at least twice a week.• When exposed to UVB rays during a longer period, the body degrades pre-vitamin D as fast as it gen-erates it and equilibrium is achieved.
  9. 9. • Initially, it was thought that liver and kidneys were the only organs responsible for the production of 1,25-(OH)2D.• However, it is now clearly established that many tissues, including the brain (Eyles et al., 2005), express vitamin D 1α- hydroxylase, the limiting enzyme responsible for the formation of 1,25-(OH)2D.• 1,25-(OH)2D receptors are also found throughout the whole body including the CNS.• Vitamin D transported in plasma in combination with Vitamin D binding protein (VDBP).
  10. 10. • Like other neurosteroids (i.e. oestrogen) 1,25-(OH)2D is believed to act via two types of receptors:• (i) The nuclear vitamin D receptor (VDR): - a member of the steroid/thyroid hormone super-family of transcription regulation factors, and• (ii) The putative membrane receptor—MARRS (membrane associated, rapid response steroid binding), also known as Erp57/Grp58.
  11. 11. • The classical actions of vitamin D start with binding to the VDR.• which, in turn, hetero-dimerises with nuclear receptors of the retinoic X receptor (RXR) family binding to vitamin D responsive elements (VDRE), located in the promoter regions of hundreds of target genes (Wang et al., 2005).• The more rapid non-classical actions of 1,25-(OH)2D are believed to involve binding to the MARRS receptor.• Located at the cell surface initiating non genomic effects such as the rapid stimutation of calcium and phosphorus uptake (Khanal and Nemere, 2007).
  12. 12. • 1,25-(OH)2D binds to its nuclear receptor (VDR)• Hetero dimerisation with RXR,• The 1,25D/VDR/RXR complex recognizes vitamin D responsive elements (VDRE)• Upon binding, co-repressive factors (CoRe) or co-activator factors (CoAc) are recruited ( Induction of genomic responses)• Genes whose expression is repressed by 1,25-(OH)2D comprise parathyroid hormone (PTH) and 1 -α-hydroxylase.• Genes whose expression is enhanced include (i) osteopontin, cathelicidin, TNF alpha, HLA DRB 15* and (ii) NGF, p75NTR, TGF beta, calbindin, respectively.
  13. 13. • 1,25-(OH)2D bind to its membrane receptor (MARRS).• Regulates the activity of adenylate cyclase, phospholipase C (PLC), protein kinase C (PKC), Src proteins.• Induces the release of Ca2 from intracellular stores as well as the recruitment of extracellular Ca2 through store operated channels (SOC).• Modulates the cell cycle via TGF and EGF receptors.• Involved in MHC1 assembly.
  14. 14. VITAMIN D AND THE NERVOUS SYSTEM• Vitamin D receptors (VDR) are widely distributed throughout the embryonic brain prominently in the neuro-epithelium and proliferating zones (Stumpf et al., 1982).• In the adult brain found in temporal, orbital and cingulate cortex, in the thalamus, in the accumbens nuclei, parts of the stria termi-nalis and amygdala and widely throughout the olfactory system.• Also expressed in pyramidal neurons of the hippocampal regions CA1, CA2, CA3, CA4, in rats (Stumpf et al., 1982) (Eyles et al., 2005).• 1,25-(OH)2D is present in the cerebrospinal fluid (Balabanova et al., 1984).• Vitamin D has also been shown to regulate important neurotrophic factors in the brain such as nerve growth factor (NGF) (Wion et al., 1991).
  15. 15. • Vitamin D has been shown to be neuro-protective, notably by inducing the synthesis of Ca2+-binding proteins, such as parvalbumin (de Viragh et al., 1989).• Vitamin D has also been reported to inhibit the synthesis of inducible nitric oxide synthase (Garcion et al., 1997, 1998), an enzyme induced in neurons and non-neuronal cells during ischemia or in the neurodegenerative conditions Alzheimers disease, Parkinsons disease, AIDS, infections, multiple sclerosis).
  16. 16. VITAMIN D AND THE IMMUNE SYSTEM• It has been shown that diminished vitamin D (i) induces immune-mediated symptoms in animal models of auto-immune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, type I diabetes mellitus, systemic lupus erythematosus or inflammatory bowel diseases (review Szodoray et al., 2008).• It has also been demonstrated that vitamin D reverses age- related inflammatory changes in the rat hippocampus (Moore et al., 2005).• Vitamin D affects the differentiation and function of cells in the immune system. CD4-positive T lymphocytes have been shown to be the preferential target of vitamin D.• It has been demonstrated that vitamin D inhibits Th1 cells and the production of Th1 cytokines like IL-2, IFN-7, and TNF-a (Lemire and Archer, 1991)
  17. 17. • Vitamin D has also been reported to – (i) up-regulate IL-4 (Cantorna et al., 1998) and IL-10 (Correale et al., 2009) and – (ii) inhibit the production of IL-6 and IL-17 (Correale et al., 2009)• Also the differentiation and survival of dendritic cells, resulting in impaired allo-reactive T cell activation (Cantorna, 2006; Griffin et al., 2001; Mathieu and Adorini, 2002).
  18. 18. VITAMIN D AND MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS• Approximately 15-20% of MS patients have a family history of MS and studies in twins indicate that much of this familial clustering is the result of shared genetic risk factors.• To date, the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) gene region is the pre-ponderant area of the human genome associated with the disease.• MS is also prompted by environmental exposure.
  19. 19. • Goldberg was the first to link sunlight and dietary factors to the epidemiology of MS (Goldberg et al., 1986).• He prompted that MS could result from an inadequate supply of vitamin D and calcium at times of rapid myelination, mainly in adolescence.• Thirty-six years later, epidemiological, animal and in vitro data are compelling and indicate that low vitamin D is a candidate risk-modifying factor for MS.
  20. 20. Some of the evidences are:• Latitude variations. The disease is virtually unknown in equatorial regions and there is an inverse correlation between latitude (a proxy marker for vitamin D levels) and disease prevalence.• Ultraviolet B radiation (UVB).• MS prevalence increases with decreasing solar radiation, suggesting a protective effect of sunlight. In the USA, a pro-spective study among more than 7 million military per-sonnel suggest that high circulating levels of vitamin D is correlated to a lower risk of MS (Munger et al., 2006).
  21. 21. • Season of birth. There is evidence in many areas that MS has seasonality of birth (Leibowitz et al., 1968; Suther-land et al., 1962; Templer et al., 1992; Torrey et al., 2000).• Oral vitamin D intake. Areas with diets rich in fish oil (a major source of vitamin D) have lower incidence of MS (Agranoff and Goldberg, 1974; Hayes et al., 1997). Same also reported in a cohort of nearly 200,000 women (Munger et al., 2006).• In vitro and animal experiments. When administered during the immunisation phase, vitamin D prevents clinical signs of EAE(Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE), also called Experimental Allergic Encephalomyelitis, is an animal model of Multiple Sclerosis) It has been observed that vitamin D reverses EAE by inhibiting chemokine synthesis and monocyte trafficking (Pedersen et al., 2007).
  22. 22. Some of the proposed theories• 1. Vitamin D induces naive CD4+ T to differentiate into regulatory T cells producing IL-10. This IL-10 is able to prevent CNS inflammation when they are targeted to the site of inflammation. Accordingly, it has been found that IL-10 is essential for vitamin D-mediated inhibition of EAE (Spach et al., 2006).• 2. Deficiencies in NK cells are described in patients with MS. vitamin D stimulates NK cells that are known to play an immuno-regulatory role in the preven-tion of MS(Baxter and Smyth, 2002).
  23. 23. • 3. There is an increased number of osteopontin transcripts are also found in the brain of MS patients .• Osteopontin (i) increases IL-12 production by macrophages; (ii) enhances interferon gamma and TNF expression by T cells; (iii) blocks IL-10 production by B cells and (iv) augments survival of acti-vated T cells.• Vitamin D is a tissue-specific stimulator or inhibitor of osteopontin.• 4. Vitamin D deficiency led to a permanent dysre-gulation of many transcripts, including calcineurin and one of the FK506 binding proteins (FKBP) (Eyles et al., 2007).• These two molecules limits the IL-2production which is necessary for full T-cell activation.• Also the FKBP blocks the function of the enzyme calcineurin and, as a conse-quence, inhibits the activation of the cytoplasmic com-ponent of the nuclear factor of activated
  24. 24. • 5. HLA-DRB1*1501 is the major locus determining genetic sus-ceptibility for MS (ref). Attractively, it has been shown very recently that vitamin D directly regulates the expression of this gene (Ramagopalan et al., 2009).• 6. Oligoden-drocytes express VDR and respond to 1,25- (OH)2D (Baas et al., 2000).• Prenatal vitamin D deficiency induces a permanent down- regula-tion of Myelin-associated oligodendrocytic basic protein (MOBP) mRNA within the cerebrum of the adult offspring (Eyles et al., 2007).
  25. 25. Vit. D in other brain diseases Parkinsons disease• The substantia nigra is the area of the human brain where the VDR is most highly expressed.• Again GDNFR-α, ret, and neur-turin, three genes strongly linked to Parkinsons disease shows the expression of Vitamin D Responsive Elements (VDRE) .• It has been demonstrated that vitamin D positively regulates the expression of GDNF (Sanchez et al., 2002) and tyrosine hydroxylase (Puchacz et al., 1996).• Furthermore, a permanent down-regulation of Park 7 expression has been described in the hippocampus of adult rats born to vitamin D-deficient mothers (Eyles et al., 2007).
  26. 26. • Confirmatively, a significant higher prevalence of hypovitaminosis D was observed in patients with Parkinsons dis-ease, when compared to both healthy controls and patients with Alzheimers disease (Evatt et al., 2008).• In addition, a positive association between VDR gene polymorphism and Parkinsons disease has been reported (Kim et al., 2005).• Finally the vitamin D binding protein (VDBP) has been recently shown to be one of eight cerebrospinal fluid bio- markers in Parkinsons disease (Zhang et al., 2008).
  27. 27. Vit. D and Epilepsy• Kalueffs team has demonstrated that vitamin D plays an anti- convulsive role in an epilepsy animal model, triggered by pentylenetetrazole chloride (PTZ).• Injection of vitamin D, 30-180 min before seizure induction, reduces the deleterious effect of PTZ (Kalueff et al., 2005).• Again an increased expression of VDR within the hippocampus has been observed in rats after pilocarpine- induced seizures (Janjoppi et al., 2008).
  28. 28. Vit.D and Depression• In a very large study involving more than 1000 older adults, mean levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D were found significantly lower in those with minor depression and major depression when compared to controls (Hoogendijk et al., 2008).• Vitamin D Responsive Elements have been identified in silico in the promoter regions of serotonin receptors and trypto-phan hydroxylase, two genes associated with depression ((Wang et al., 2005)
  29. 29. Vit D deficiency• No one is immune to vit. D deficiency.• Most common causes are – 1. excess skin pigmentation Melanin is absobs the UVB of sunlight quite efficiently hence interferes with the Vit. D synthesis. ** Negros are prone to Vit.D deficiency. - 2. Sun screen lotion A lotion with SPF 15 (Sun protection Factor) or above interferes with the synthesis decreasing to a level of 1%. 3. Zenith Angle (the angle between sun and earth) The increased zenith angle decreases the UVB exposure leading to decreased synthesis of Vit.D. ** Early morning and late afternoon is the period where least synthesis occurs. **
  30. 30. • Age: -• Aging is associated with decreased concentrations of 7- dehydrocholesterol, the precursor of vitamin D3 in the skin.• A 70-y-old has «25% of the 7-dehydrocholesterol that a young adult does and thus has a 75% reduced capacity to make vitamin D3 in the skin.• Obesity: -• Because vitamin D is fat soluble, it is readily taken up by fat cells.• Obesity is associated with vitamin D deficiency and it is believed to be due, to the sequestration of vitamin D by the large body fat pool.
  31. 31. Nonskeletal Consequences Of Vitamin D Deficiency• In the 1980s and 1990s, several observations suggested that living at higher latitudes increased the risk of developing and dying of colon, prostate, breast, and several other cancers.• Because living at higher latitudes diminishes vitamin D3 production, it was suggested that an as-sociation may exist between vitamin D deficiency and cancer mortality.
  32. 32. CONCLUSION• Vitamin D exhibits all the main characteristics of a true neuroactive steroid.• We highlighted few previously unrecognized diverse range of adverse CNS outcomes, including autoimmune and neurodegenerative diseases.• This update will inspire clinical and basic researchers to collaborate in an effort to understand the pleiotropic roles of vitamin D in brain function.
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