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Pediatric Urologist Juwayriya

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  1. 1. Sensory and emotional experience associated with actualor potential tissue damage
  2. 2. According to Katz and Melzack, pain is apersonal and subjective experience thatcan only be felt by the sufferer.According to McCaffery pain is whateverthe experiencing person says it is andexists whenever they say it does.
  3. 3. TYPES OF PAIN ACUTE PAIN CHRONIC PAIN CUTANEOUS PAIN DEEP SOMATIC PAIN VISCERAL PAIN REFERRED PAIN NEUROPATHIC PAIN PHANTOM PAIN
  4. 4. Effects of painSympathetic responses Pallor Increased blood pressure Increased pulse Increased respiration Skeletal muscle tension Diaphoresis
  5. 5. Effects of painParasympathetic responses Decreased blood pressure Decreased pulse Nausea & vomiting Weakness Pallor Loss of consciousness
  6. 6. Individual Variations inresponse to Pain:-
  7. 7. Behavioralcharacteristics Facial expressions- grimace, clenched teeth,wrinkled forehead, crying Body movements -restlessness, immobilization,muscle tension, protective movement of bodyparts Social interaction- avoidance of conversation &contacts
  8. 8. FACTORS INFLUENCINGPAIN PHYSIOLOGICAL SOCIAL SPIRITUAL PSYCHOLOGICAL CULTURAL
  9. 9. PAIN ASSESSMENT PAIN RATINGSCALES- NRS,VAS,VAT,FACESRATING SCALE, PAIN-0-METER McGill PAINQUESTIONNAIRE BODY MAP
  10. 10. Post operative pain Acute Nociceptors and Neuropathic pain Surgical pain
  11. 11. Why is control important Delays post op recovery Increases morbidity Delays return to normal function Restricts mobility -> thromboembolism Catecholamine release Pulmonary dysfunction
  12. 12. Assessment Pre op prediction Post op subjective assessment Post op objective assessment
  13. 13. Initial Pain Evaluation The initial evaluation of pain should include adescription of the pain using the PQRSTcharacteristics: P Palliative or provocative factors: ‘What makes itless intense?’ Q Quality: ‘What is it like?’ R Radiation: ‘Does it spread anywhere else?’ S Severity: ‘How severe is it?’ T Temporal factors: ‘Is it there all the time, or does itcome and go?’
  14. 14.  To study the effects of both physical and non-physical influences onpatient well-being, an instrument must assess more dimensions than the intensity of pain or otherphysical symptoms. Several validated questionnaires to assess various QoL dimensions are available,including the Medical Outcomes Short-Form Health Survey Questionnaire 36 (SF-36), and the EuropeanOrganisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Core Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30) (26-30).There are several rating scales available to assess pain. Rating painusing a visual analogue scale (VAS, Figure1) or collection of VAS scales (such as the brief pain inventory) is anessential part of pain assessment. Itsease of use and analysis has resulted in its widespread adoption. It is,however, limited for the assessment ofchronic pain.
  15. 15. Pre op assessment Past medical and surgical history Current Rx (prescribed and illicit) Allergies Past pain history and treatments Patients expectations of pain Advice re pain Mx and modes of delivery How we measure pain and patients reporting
  16. 16. Subjective assessment Pain scales - single dimensional and multidimensional
  17. 17. Objective Look at the patient Physiological parameters Functional parameters
  18. 18. Outcomes assessment Response to therapy
  19. 19. ABCDE for pain assessment&management Ask about pain regularly Believe the patient and family in their reports &whatrelieves it Choose pain control options appropriate for thepatient Deliver interventions timely, logical &coordinatedfashion Empower patient and their families
  20. 20. JCAHO Standards for postoperativepain management are: Recognize patients’ rights to appropriateassessment and management of pain Screen for pain and assess the nature andintensity of pain in all patients Record assessment results in a way that allowsregular reassessment and follow-up Determine and ensure that staff are competentin assessing and managing pain. Address pain assessment and managementwhen orienting new clinical staff
  21. 21. Standards Contd.. Establish policies and procedures that supportappropriate prescribing of pain medications Ensure that pain doesn’t interfere with a patient’sparticipation in rehabilitation Educate patients and their families about effectivepain management
  22. 22. POSTOPERATIVE PAINMANAGEMENT
  23. 23. WHO Pain ladder
  24. 24. PRINCIPLES OF PHARMACEUTICALPAIN MANAGEMENT Provide medication in adequate doses. Utilize a preventive approach to pain relief. Useround the clock dosing with rescue medicationavailable. Closely assess clients with particular diligencewith first doses or when medication dose or thetype is changed Combinations of analgesics may be moreeffective than those given singularly.
  25. 25. PRINCIPLES CONTD. Understand and be prepared to treat sideeffects of medications avoidance of non-life threatening sideeffects (such as constipation, nausea,pruritis) more important that providing painrelief. These concomitant conditions areeasily treated. Additions of adjuvant medications enhancepain relief.
  26. 26. Principles contd. Believe the patient’s report of pain. Maintain a therapeutic relationship thatfacilitates mutual trust. Do not use placebos for pain. incorporate the goal of total pain relief intothe pain management regimen operate as a team to provide the mosteffective pain relief outcomes
  27. 27. PRINCIPLES CONTD. Asking for pain medication reflects the need forpain relief in 99.9% of people with pain anddoses does not reflect an addictive personality. Recognize that respiratory depression is a rareoccurrence, occurring most commonly amongclients who are over sedated. Respiratorydepression rarely occurs after the first fewdoses of an opioid.
  28. 28. Principles contd. Only the patient and no one else can determine theamount of pain experienced There are no objective indicators that can beobserved by another
  29. 29. Management contd..Non-pharmacologicalinterventions Massage Diversion therapy Relaxation therapy TENS Heat & coldapplications Yoga
  30. 30. Pain managementMedications to control pain (Pharmacological) Anesthetic agents Analgesic agents NSAIDs
  31. 31. Anesthetic agentsLocal Anesthetics- Lidocaine Bupivacaine Ketamine
  32. 32. AnalgesicsOpioid Analgesics Fentanyl Morphine Codeine Demerol (Meperidine) Benzodiazepines
  33. 33. Commonly used drugs Inj.Morphine(50mg) & Inj.Lorazepam(16mg) in 37ml of 5% dextrose@ 4-8ml/hr Inj.Medazolam2mg/hr If agitated -Halopperidol
  34. 34. Analgesics contd..Non-Opioid Analgesics Paracetamol Aspirin NSAIDs- ketorolac Celecoxib Brufen
  35. 35. NSAIDs
  36. 36. NSAID
  37. 37. Patient receivingEpidural Analgesia
  38. 38. Epidural Analgesiasyringe
  39. 39. Patient ControlledAnalgesia (PCA)
  40. 40. Practicalities Pre op assessment Prediction of pain Preempt with preventative Rx Assess post op subjectively and objectively Treat with appropriate Rx Assess response Modify Mx

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