Understanding Copyright and Remixing by Example
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Understanding Copyright and Remixing by Example

on

  • 188 views

Contains two parts: 1) Reviewing copyright and fair use, and 2) Examples of remixing creative commons licensed resources

Contains two parts: 1) Reviewing copyright and fair use, and 2) Examples of remixing creative commons licensed resources

Statistics

Views

Total Views
188
Views on SlideShare
188
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Understanding Copyright and Remixing by Example Understanding Copyright and Remixing by Example Presentation Transcript

  • www.lumenlearning.com Overview of Copyright and Fair Use • Any work where broader rights are not explicitly granted is copyrighted • Fair Use allows limited exceptions to copyright. Fair use is a bit vague, but generally the materials • Should be restricted access (password protected) • Should be used for a limited time (not be a regular, integral part of the course) • Should not be available for purchase
  • www.lumenlearning.com An instructor posts their own lecture notes on a public wiki or blog. This is OK: The instructor is the copyright holder. A copyright holder can do anything they want with their work.
  • www.lumenlearning.com An instructor posts a PDF of a journal article on a public blog. This is not OK: The instructor is providing public access to a copyrighted work. Citing some passages as part of a critique or review would be fine
  • www.lumenlearning.com An instructor posts a PDF of a journal article in the LMS for their student. If done for one term, this likely would fall under Fair Use. If made a regular, integral part of the course, this probably is not under Fair Use, and a coursepack would be more appropriate.
  • www.lumenlearning.com An instructor posts a link to an article on the Forbes.com website Linking to a work provided online by the copyright holder is always OK. The downside is that if Forbes removes the article or changes the URL, you lose access.
  • www.lumenlearning.com An instructor posts a PDF of a textbook section or chapter in the LMS. This is not OK: The copyrighted material is readily available for purchase, and by posting it online, you’re affecting the market for that product. This is not allowed, even under Fair Use. This is piracy.
  • www.lumenlearning.com An instructor posts in the LMS a link to a PDF of a textbook section or chapter that was found in a Google search. This is still not OK: Just because someone else facilitated the piracy does not make it legal. This is the same reason that it’s illegal to download music and movies that someone posted online.
  • www.lumenlearning.com An instructor posts a PDF of Creative Commons licensed textbook. This is OK: By adding a Creative Commons license, the copyright holder has explicitly allowed you to redistribute the work.
  • www.lumenlearning.com An instructor finds a great website that a teacher at another school put up with their lecture notes. The website says the materials are free for educational use. He wants to put a copy of the materials in the LMS. This is gray zone, but probably not OK: Saying that the materials are free for educational use does not necessarily allow redistributing. Some folks would not allow it, especially if their website includes advertisements. It would be best to contact the author (and suggest they use a CC license).
  • www.lumenlearning.com When in Doubt ASK!
  • www.lumenlearning.com Creative Commons Permissions By Example
  • www.lumenlearning.com This is fine. You are revising and redistributing each chapter, as allowed. An instructor wants to include in their course: 1) a chapter from a CC Attribution-ShareAlike (BY- SA) licensed book and 2) a few sections of a chapter from a CC Attribution- ShareAlike-NonCommercial (BY-SA-NC) licensed book.
  • www.lumenlearning.com An instructor wants to use a chapter from a CC Attribution-ShareAlike-NonCommercial (BY-SA-NC) licensed book in their course, but wants to add into it an image from Wikipedia that is CC Attribution- ShareAlike (BY-SA) licensed and an image they found on Flickr that is CC Attribution (BY) licensed. This is remixing. Using the Flickr image is fine with attribution, since the BY license allows remixing with any other license. Using the Wikipedia image is not ok, since both the SA licenses require any remix to keep the same license.
  • www.lumenlearning.com An instructor decides to make some edits to a chapter from a CC Attribution (BY) licensed book. She adds some additional original content, and revises some of the language. This is revising, and is fully allowed. Because of the permissions of the BY license, she course make her revised work available under almost any license: fully restricted, CC-BY, CC-BY-SA, CC-BY-NC, CC-BY-SA- NC, etc.
  • www.lumenlearning.com An instructor decides to make some edits to a chapter from a CC Attribution-ShareAlike- NonCommercial (BY-SA-NC) licensed book. She adds some additional original content, and revises some of the language. This is revising, and is fully allowed. Because the original work had a ShareAlike license, she would be required to keep the same license on her revised version.
  • www.lumenlearning.com An instructor decides to make a Creative Commons licensed book more engaging by embedding YouTube videos directly into the text materials. This is revising of the book, and is fully allowed. YouTube’s terms of use allow embedding of their content into other pages. The downside is that the video may disappear from YouTube at some point. Unless the video is CC licensed, we can’t make a backup copy and host it ourselves in the LMS.
  • www.lumenlearning.com An instructor finds a great website that a teacher at another school put up with their lecture notes. The website says the materials are free for educational use. He wants to mix portions of those lecture notes with his Creative Commons Attribution (BY) licensed textbook. That materials on that website are copyrighted, and can not be remixed into a CC licensed work without express permission.