Kaleidoscope Overview of Copyright
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Kaleidoscope Overview of Copyright

on

  • 295 views

An overview of copyright and creative commons licenses for the Kaleidoscope kickoff 11/8/2013

An overview of copyright and creative commons licenses for the Kaleidoscope kickoff 11/8/2013

Statistics

Views

Total Views
295
Views on SlideShare
295
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
1
Downloads
5
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • just to clear up some potential confusion Open does *not equal digital, and *open does not equal free.  Perhaps * a Venn diagram would helpThere are free materials online that are not open, and there are open materials that are not online. *

Kaleidoscope Overview of Copyright Kaleidoscope Overview of Copyright Presentation Transcript

  • Uses copyright to enforce sharing lumenlearning.
  • OER: The 4R Permissions Sharing and creativity are inherent in OER: Reuse • Use the content in its unaltered form Revise • Adapt, adjust, modify, improve, or alter the content Remix • Combine the original or revised content with other OER to create something new Redistribute • Share copies of the original content, revisions or remixes with others lumenlearning.
  • Open ≠ Digital Open ≠ Free FREE DIGITAL OPEN lumenlearning.
  • Two Sides of Open Gratis: Free as in “free beer” Enables affordability Libre: Free as in “free speech” Enables collaboration, adaptability lumenlearning.
  • Open Licenses Creative Commons lumenlearning.
  • Open Licenses Creative Commons The Universal Donor Can be remixed into content of any other license The more restrictive license takes over lumenlearning.
  • Open Licenses Creative Commons Forced Openness Any remix must be kept under the same license CC-BY can be mixed in, but not NC licensed materials lumenlearning.
  • Open Licenses Creative Commons No Money-Grubbing Hands Allowed Prohibits “commercial use” Can be remixed into any material that is also NC lumenlearning.
  • Open Licenses Creative Commons Non-commercial and you better share Prohibits “commercial use” Requires any remix be kept under the same license lumenlearning.
  • Not Really Open Licenses Creative Commons No Derivatives = No changes What use is that? lumenlearning.
  • Free But Not Open Any web page you link to Any video you embed (if allowed under terms of use) Free-ish But Not Open Articles commonly available through library database lumenlearning.
  • Open but not Creative Commons Public Domain Copyright-expired works Government websites lumenlearning.
  • Considerations License Freedoms Printability Practical Remixability lumenlearning.
  • Activity Time! lumenlearning.
  • You decide to include your own lecture notes in the course. This is OK: You are the copyright holder. A copyright holder can do anything they want with their work. lumenlearning.
  • You decide to include a PDF of a journal article from Nature in the course. This is not OK: You are providing access to a copyrighted work. Citing some passages as part of a critique or review would be fine lumenlearning.
  • You want to post a link to an article on the Forbes.com website. Linking to a work provided online by the copyright holder is always OK. The downside is that if Forbes removes the article or changes the URL, you lose access. lumenlearning.
  • You want to include a PDF of a chapter from your current textbook in the course. This is not OK: The copyrighted material is readily available for purchase, and by posting it online, you’re affecting the market for that product. This is not allowed ever, even under Fair Use. This is piracy. lumenlearning.
  • You did a Google search, and found another site that has a PDF of a chapter from a Pearson textbook. You want to post a link to that site in your course. This is still not OK: Just because someone else facilitated the piracy does not make it legal. This is the same reason that it’s illegal to download music and movies that someone posted online. lumenlearning.
  • You want to include a PDF of a CC-BY-NC licensed textbook in the course. This is OK: By adding a Creative Commons license, the copyright holder has explicitly allowed you to redistribute the work. lumenlearning.
  • You find a great website that a teacher at another school put up with their lecture notes. The website says the materials are free for education use. You want to include a copy in your course. This is gray zone, but probably not OK: Saying that the materials are free for educational use does not necessarily allow redistributing. Some folks would not allow it, especially if their website includes advertisements. It would be best to contact the author (and suggest they use a CC license). lumenlearning.
  • You want to use some assessment questions in the course that came in a test bank you got with an old textbook. This is not OK: The test bank is copyrighted material. The exception is questions that are so generic no-one could possibly claim them as unique, like “What element is represented by the symbol Fe?” lumenlearning.
  • You want to embed a video from YouTube in your course. This is OK, since YouTube’s Terms of Use explicitly allow it. Like a link, you risk the video disappearing. lumenlearning.
  • You want to include in your course: 1) a chapter from a CC Attribution-ShareAlike (BYSA) licensed book and 2) a few sections of a chapter from a CC AttributionShareAlike-NonCommercial (BY-SA-NC) licensed book. This is fine. You are revising and redistributing each chapter, as allowed. You are not mixing them. lumenlearning.
  • An instructor decides to make some edits to a chapter from a CC Attribution (BY) licensed book. She adds some additional original content, and revises some of the language. This is revising, and is fully allowed. Because of the permissions of the BY license, she course make her revised work available under almost any license: fully restricted, CC-BY, CC-BY-SA, CC-BY-NC, CC-BY-SANC, etc. lumenlearning.
  • An instructor wants to spice up their lecture notes by add into it an image from Wikipedia that is CC Attribution-ShareAlike (BY-SA) licensed. This is remixing, and is permissible. Since the Wikipedia image has a ShareAlike license, the resulting document must also be released under the same Attribution-ShareAlike license. lumenlearning.
  • An instructor decides to make some edits to a chapter from a CC Attribution-ShareAlikeNonCommercial (BY-SA-NC) licensed book. She adds some additional original content, and revises some of the language. This is revising, and is fully allowed. Because the original work had a ShareAlike license, she would be required to keep the same license on her revised version. lumenlearning.
  • An instructor wants to use a chapter from a CC Attribution-ShareAlike-NonCommercial (BY-SA-NC) licensed book in their course, but wants to add into it an image from Wikipedia that is CC AttributionShareAlike (BY-SA) licensed and an image they found on Flickr that is CC Attribution (BY) licensed. This is remixing. Using the Flickr image is fine with attribution, since the BY license allows remixing with any other license. Using the Wikipedia image is not ok, since both the SA licenses require any remix to keep the same license. lumenlearning.
  • An instructor decides to make a Creative Commons licensed book more engaging by embedding YouTube videos directly into the text materials. This is revising of the book, and is fully allowed. YouTube’s terms of use allow embedding of their content into other pages. The downside is that the video may disappear from YouTube at some point. Unless the video is CC licensed, we can’t make a backup copy and host it ourselves in the LMS. lumenlearning.