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Thompson kelvin elearn 2010

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Thompson kelvin elearn 2010 Thompson kelvin elearn 2010 Presentation Transcript

  • Take Your Students Out of Solitary Confinement: Strategies for Increasing Social Presence in University Online Courses
    Kelvin Thompson, Ed.D.
    University of Central Florida
  • Caveats
    Practitioner-focused
    Not addressing “why”
    See Community of Inquiry Model, Social Learning Theory, Social Constructivism, etc.
    See E-Learn 2010 Proceedings for some good references
    I don’t have this figured out. Work in progress.
    Where
    Course Management System (CMS)-based
    Public or semi-public Web 2.0 tools
  • social presence, the degree to which one is perceived as a real person in a mediated environment
    Short, Williams, and Christie (1976)
    Garrison, Anderson, and Archer (2000)
  • Course Designv.Instructor Behaviors
  • Provide Communication Protocols
    Examples include:
    How and when to use each venue (email, IM, etc.)
    Clearly calling one another by name in visible communications
    Being specific about ideas to which one is responding
    Encouraging appropriate use of phatic communication
    1
  • 2
    Create “Interaction” Assignments
    • Introductory Interactions
    Low/no score
    Appropriate self-disclosure
    Connect to course content
    Instructor modeling (posting and responses)
    • Interaction Assignments
    Clear prompt for response
    Provide explicit scoring criteria based on desired behaviors
    • Require posting of student perspective
    • Require responses by classmates to student work
    • Address timing (to avoid “post and run” behavior)
  • 3
    Design Authentic Learning Assignments
    Practical, projects/tasks
    High challenge, low stress (Csikszentmihalyi, 1994)
    Ideally, connect to student interests
    These:
    Require personal investment by students
    Are worthy of substantive feedback
    Peer review (provide guidance and incentive)
    Instructor
  • 4
    Model Appropriate Self-Disclosure
    Share instructor bio at beginning of course
    Create a warm welcome message
    Drop tidbits of info in course communications
  • 5
    Cultivate a Humane Tone
    Beware of written messages that “zap.”
    Express interest/concern.
    Consider audio.
    “Thanks for asking, John.”
    “If you have any questions or concerns, please let me know.”
    “I noticed…. Is there something going on about which I should be aware?”
  • 6
    Respond Quicklyto Messages from Students
    Address turn-around time in syllabus
    Be consistent
    Notify students when you’ll be unreachable
  • 7
    Make Weekly Updates
    Text and audio (some students will use both)
    Brief (less than 2 pages or 10 minutes)
    Consider podcast tools (Box.net is useful)
    “I felt like there was a real instructor there.”
  • 8
    Solicit Weekly Student Feedback
    Anonymous
    Ask what worked and what didn’t
    Include questions on “connectedness”
  • 9
    Respond To/Take Action on Student Feedback
    Podcast
    Announcements
    Email All
  • 10
    Give General Feedback
    Podcast
    Announcements
    Discussion Forum
    Email All
  • 11
    Give Specific Student Feedback
    If large class, use scoring rubric with highlightable written descriptions (See http://irubric.com or “Grading Forms” in Blackboard’s WebCT Vista/CE)
    Provide person-specific written feedback is possible
    Include student name
  • 12
    Send Regular Content-Based Messages
    Course Email
    Announcements
    Twitter (embed widget in CMS)
    HootCourse.com
    Text messaging (SendGM.com or other)
  • 13
    Live in the Open
    Model participation in Personal/professional Learning Network (PLN)
    Web 2.0 Tools
    Social Networking/Media
  • Caution
    Time commitment(beware of diminishing returns)
    Some students resist (self-fulfilling false beliefs about online learning)
  • Wrap-Up/Conclusion
    Cultivating Social Presence
    Connectedness
    Student Satisfaction
  • Follow Up
    Kelvin Thompson, Ed.D.
    kthompso@mail.ucf.edu
    http://twitter.com/kthompso
    http://bit.ly/thompson_elearn
    Presentation & Examples/Supporting Materials
    (audio to follow)