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The Blended Learning Toolkit: A DIY Platform for Blended Learning Faculty Development
 

The Blended Learning Toolkit: A DIY Platform for Blended Learning Faculty Development

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Presentation to the 2012 SUNY Learning Network SUNY Online Learning Summit on the BlendKit Course materials from http://blendedlearningtoolkit.org

Presentation to the 2012 SUNY Learning Network SUNY Online Learning Summit on the BlendKit Course materials from http://blendedlearningtoolkit.org

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  • Press F5 or enter presentation mode to view the poll\r\nIn an emergency during your presentation, if the poll isn't showing, navigate to this link in your web browser:\r\nhttp://www.polleverywhere.com/multiple_choice_polls/LTQzNjY4MDk5NQIf you like, you can use this slide as a template for your own voting slides. You might use a slide like this if you feel your audience would benefit from the picture showing a text message on a phone.
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The Blended Learning Toolkit: A DIY Platform for Blended Learning Faculty Development The Blended Learning Toolkit: A DIY Platform for Blended Learning Faculty Development Presentation Transcript

  • The Blended Learning Toolkit: A DIY Platform for Blended Learning Faculty Development Kelvin Thompson, Ed.D. University of Central Florida @kthompso#slnsolsummit #blendkitThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License
  • http://bit.ly/suny12_thompson
  • Caveats• No widely accepted definition of blended learning• Blended = “best/worst of both worlds”• Blended learning best conceptualized as f2f-enhanced web course• Integration of f2f and online is perhaps the most elusive of concepts for blended instructors• Materials shared here are targeted at those transitioning from f2f-only experience but may be applicable to those with prior online or blended experience• No one-size-fits-all answers• Goal: Provide resources you can include in faculty development for blended learning 3
  • Caveats• Please follow along! (short urls throughout)• Polls interspersed throughout – Text messaging (send to 37607) – Twitter (tweet to @poll) – Web site (go to http://PollEv.com/blendkit)• Specific codes to use for each response option on each poll• A LOT to introduce, so please jot down thoughts for the end  4
  • An Institutional ProfileBLENDED LEARNING @ UCF
  • Blended Learning at UCF 500% growth in blended coursesn Fully Online Coursesn Blended Learning Courses
  • UCF Fall 2008 Headcount “Live” Main Campus Students 43,466 “Live” Rosen Campus Students 865 2,446 1,301 2.6% 1.7% 137 111 0.3% 0.2% 33,087 Web 65.8% 7,127 2,847 Students 14.2% 5.7% 11,514 363 0.7% 923 1,436 1.8% 2.9% 2,046 “Live” 4.1% Regional Students 4,800
  • UCF Fall 2009 Headcount “Live” Main Campus Students 45,988 “Live” Rosen Campus Students 782 2,531 827 1.6% 1.5% 204 697 0.4% 1.3% 33,988 Web 63.5% 8,593 3,637 Students 16.1% 6.8% 14,543 375 0.7% 1,030 1,497 1.9% 2.8% “Live” 1,886 3.6% Regional Students 4,809
  • UCF Fall 2010 Headcount “Live” Main Campus Students 47,926 “Live” Rosen Campus Students 695 2,472 758 1.2% 1.4% 234 764 0.4% 1.4% 34,059 Web 60.6% 10,363 4,113 Students 18.4% 7.3% 17,172 478 0.9% 1,213 2.1% 1,490 2.7% “Live” 2,049 3.6% Regional Students 5,251
  • Blended Learning at UCF Blended Learning 2009-2010 Totals since Academic Year 2002Sections 681 5,031Registrations 24,241 160,860Student Credit Hours (SCH) 70,438 476,823
  • Course Evaluation Ratings N = 672,185 Course Modality % Overall “Excellent”Blended 51.2%Fully Online 48.3%Face to Face 48.2%Lecture Capture (with classroom) 43.4%Lecture Capture (no classroom) 41.6%
  • Student Success Rates by Modality F2F Blended Fully Online (n=618,899) (n=39,021) (n=109,421) 100 95 91 91 88 91 88 91 94 88 90 87 88 88 88 87 86 80 70Percent 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 Spring 09 Summer 09 Fall 09 Spring 10 Summer 10
  • Withdrawal Rates by Modality 100 90 F2F (n=551,065) Blended (n=39,769) Fully Online (n=109,495) 80 70Percent 60 50 40 30 20 10 4 4 5 3 2 4 3 3 4 3 3 5 2 4 1 0 Spring Summer Fall Spring Summer 09 09 09 10 10
  • Student Satisfaction in Fully Online and Blended Courses Fully online (N = 1,526) Blended (N = 485)Percent 44% 39% 41% 38% 9% 11% 9% 5% 3% 1% Very Satisfied Neutral Very Unsatisfied Satisfied Unsatisfied
  • Faculty Willingness to Teach Web/Blended Courses in the Future Definitely Probably Probably not Definitely notPositive 69% 81% 16% 13%Neutral 10% 2% or 6% 4%negative Online Blended n=71 N=53 Modality
  • The Blended Learning ToolkitOVERVIEW 16
  • UCF/AASCU NGLC Project Overview• Scale the proven UCF Blended Learning model via the national AASCU network of more than 420 institutions and systems• Starting with 20 targeted schools selected for their alignment with NGLC objectives (under 26, low income) 17
  • Scale UCF Model of Blended Learning• Across 20 AASCU institutions and 11 states 18
  • PartnersIndividual Institutions State Coordinating Institutions State Participating InstitutionsColumbus State University Missouri Harris-Stowe State UniversityFayetteville State University Lincoln University of MissouriGrambling State University Missouri Southern State Southeast Missouri State UniversityNorthwestern State University (LA) University Missouri State UniversityIndiana University Kokomo University of Missouri-St. LouisTexas A&M University-Corpus Christi Alabama University of North AlabamaThe College at Brockport, Troy University University of SouthState University of New York AlabamaThomas Edison State College Minnesota St. Cloud State UniversityUniversity of Maine at Fort Kent Winona State University 19
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  • Project Overview• An open educational resource (OER) Blended Learning Toolkit containing: – Best practices, strategies, models, and course design principles. – Two OER prototype courses in Composition and Algebra. – Faculty development resources – Assessment and data collection protocols, including survey instruments and standards. 21
  • Goals for BlendKit Course• Design and develop your blended learning course• Consideration of key issues related to blended learning and practical guidance in helping you produce actual materials for your blended course (i.e., from design documents through creating content pages to peer review feedback at your own institutions). 22
  • BlendKit Course Materials• Instructional modules• BlendKit Reader• Do-It-Yourself design tasks• Recordings of interdisciplinary faculty interviews• Recordings of online webinar discussions with faculty group http://bit.ly/blendkit 25
  • BlendKit Course MaterialsGUIDED TOUR 26
  • BlendKit Reader• Designed to stimulate scholarly reflection/discussion• “Questions to Ponder” for each chapter• Drawn from Creative Commons licensed material (except as noted) plus original content• Five chapters (7-14 pages each)• Available in html, pdf, and ebook (mobi & epub) http://bit.ly/blendkit_reader 27
  • Recordings• Interdisciplinary faculty from three institutions: – Instructor audio interviews [10 minutes each] – Webinar sessions with Q&A [30 minutes each] • Understanding Blended Learning • Blended Interactions • Blended Assessments of Learning • Blended Content & Assignments • Quality Assurance http://bit.ly/blendkit_recordings 33
  • DIY Tasks• Step-by-step guides for many common development tasks – Explanations – Templates – Examples• Five broad tasks with at least 2 sub-tasks each• Substantive in specificity! http://bit.ly/blendkit_diy 38
  • DIY TasksTask 01: Conceptualize Your Blended Learning CourseTask 02: Design for Interaction in Your Blended LearningCourseTask 03: Decide Upon Assessments of Learning in YourBlended Learning CourseTask 04: Develop Content/Assignment Pages for YourBlended Learning CourseTask 05: Assure Quality in Your Blended Learning Course http://bit.ly/blendkit_diy 39
  • Task 01: Conceptualize Your Blended CourseCOURSE BLUEPRINT 40
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  • Course Blueprint• Easily by-passed, but don’t!• High level overview mapping course goals to assignments• Use electronic version or just do it on a piece of paper – Word template looks cool but doc versions may cause problems• May be “in your head,” but get it out on paper• Ignore delivery mode (f2f v. online) initially – Focus on identifying the best activities to achieve the course goals 46
  • Task 01: Conceptualize Your Blended CourseMIX MAP 47
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  • Mix Map• Identify a mode (f2f, online, both) for all components• Suggested approach – online course with face-to-face enhancements• How to decide on delivery mode: – Start with your absolutes - What has to be delivered face-to-face or online? What works best in one environment v. the other? – Next – What will work in either environment? – Note: You may need to modify an existing activity to fit a new delivery mode. (See Task 3)• Map out your overall strategy paying particular attention to how the two environments integrate – Integration is the single most challenging issue in blended learning! 51
  • Task 02: Design for InteractionCREATE COURSE DOCUMENTDRAFTS 52
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  • Create Course Documents• Emphasis on single-purpose online documents (Neidorf, 2006)• Making the formerly implicit (f2f) explicit (online)• Clear articulation of student expectations• Some people prefer “print-friendly” versions (e.g., pdf) over HTML – TIP: See accessibility guidelines! 57
  • Task 02: Design for InteractionUSING ZAPT 58
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  • Using Zapt• HTML is truly cross-platform (all can view)• Accessible HTML avoids weird code• Zapt tool is very easy if initial set-up doesn’t scare you away!• Note: Formatting instructions (CSS files) are housed on UCF servers – Pro: Immediate set-up – Con: Must upload to preview Trusting that we’ll keep them online 63
  • Task 02: Design for InteractionMODULE INTERACTIONWORKSHEET 64
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  • Module Interaction Worksheet• Builds upon Blueprint and Mix Map tasks• Sets the stage for Creating Module Pages• Assumes that one will be developing online modules – Several questions useful for designing interaction independent of module – Possibly think “weeks” instead of modules• Another opportunity to consider integration of f2f and online 69
  • Task 03: Decide Upon Assessments of LearningASSIGNMENT INSTRUCTIONS 70
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  • Assignment Instructions• Remember to revise Blueprint and Course Docs as ideas evolve!• Goal: Standalone documents with perfect clarity of expectations • The clearer the written communication, the more time is freed for f2f activities.• Goal: Make the formerly implicit explicit – However, written instructions could be distributed f2f or online.• Make sure students understand how each assignment links online and f2f• Do not duplicate assignments or content between f2f and online – Ex: Reading assignments as homework and then cover content in class. Make sure class discussion covers items subject to confusion and expands on reading through examples, case studies, etc. – If online assignment is an extension of f2f discussion/activity, ensure students understand what needs to be added or expanded in the online assignment. 74
  • Task 03: Decide Upon Assessments of LearningCONFIGURE ONLINE QUIZ SETTINGS 75
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  • Configure Online Quiz Settings• A primer for online assessment – Minimize motivation for cheating – Examine biases for assessment in one mode over another – Make assumptions explicit (e.g., collaboration, etc.) – Opportunity to review cognitive level of existing assessments• Specifics will be determined by your CMS/testing software 78
  • Task 04: Develop Content/Assignment PagesCREATE MODULE PAGES 79
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  • Create Module Pages• A possible extension of earlier Assignment Instructions and Module Interaction tasks• Goal: Standalone documents with perfect clarity of expectations• The clearer the written communication, the more time is freed for f2f activities.• One cohesive whole from which students may access assignment instructions, course content, etc. 84
  • Task 04: Develop Content/Assignment PagesMODULE TEMPLATE 85
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  • Module Template• Use as a starting point• Decide upon all elements to include in your modules (e.g, objectives, content, references)• Use Word style sheet (e.g., “Heading 1,” etc.)• Review Assignment Instructions for possible module headings/sub-headings• Maintain consistency from one module to next• Use Zapt to generate accessible HTML if you wish 88
  • Task 05: Assure QualityBLENDED COURSEIMPLEMENTATION CHECKLIST 89
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  • Implementation Checklist• Very generic steps!• Incorporate your institution’s requirements• Structured approach is reminiscent of managing an online course (may feel unusual for f2f)• Note numerous cues for fostering integration of f2f/online• Note emphasis on iterative design (e.g., simple design feedback collection punch list for next version) 92
  • Task 05: Assure QualityBLENDED COURSE SELF-ASSESSMENT/PEER REVIEW FORM 93
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  • Self-Assessment/Peer Review Form• Many elements are common to courses in all modes• Blended-specific sections – First (“Course Expectations”) – Last (“Implementation of Blended”)• Evaluate it yourself, but there’s no substitute for a new set of eyes!• Identify a trusted colleague• Note evaluation of design vs. implementation 98
  • Instructional Modules• Pulls together all BlendKit Course materials (readings, tasks, etc.)• Each module anchored to – one focus question – 3-4 learning objectives http://bit.ly/blendkit_activities 100
  • FACULTY DEVELOPMENT LESSONSLEARNED 107
  • BlendKit2011• Open online course focused on blended learning – Publicly accessible readings, document templates, and how-to instructions + – Five weeks of facilitation: • Weekly encouraging messages • Weekly 30 min. webinars featuring guest blended learning instructors & discussion with others • Weekly reading/activity reflection prompts for blogging (more interaction with others). • Social networking opportunities for more interaction 108
  • Why an Open Online Course?• Open materials may be used at any time for self-study well beyond the NGLC grant period• No differences in course management systems to get in the way of the course• Easier for participants to self-select course components with which to engage• More diverse group, larger number of participants with whom to interact 109
  • = NGLC Institution= Non-NGLC Institution 110
  • Lessons Learned• Many participants would’ve preferred more structure• Next time: Use CMS as home base• Consider more traditional participation roles – Successful completion = submitting required assignments – Auditing = all other participation• Consider implementing open badges 111
  • BlendKit2012?• Possibly offering another cohort option in summer 2012• Get on the mailing list: http://bit.ly/blendkit_mailinglist
  • Ideas for Adaptation• Use the BlendKit Reader for discussion group• Link to specific components as you wish• All materials are licensed for reuse/remixing – Download, edit, and upload to your own web site – Modify materials and send copies to us for uploading• Other ideas?• Contact us for brainstorming! 113
  • Blended Teaching StrategiesTeaching Online Pedagogical Repository http://topr.online.ucf.edu
  • What Is It?a resource to support the curation of effectivepedagogical practices in online and blended coursesindividual entries include: • strategy description drawn from the pedagogical practice of online/blended teaching faculty • artifacts depicting the strategy from actual courses • alignment with cited findings from research or professional practice literatureAll released for reuse/remix under CreativeCommons
  • • 30+ published strategies relevant to online and blended courses• New strategies added/updated regularly• Categorized by Content, Interaction, or Assessment• Get ideas for your blended course design!
  • QUESTIONS? COMMENTS? DISCUSSION? 118
  • Thanks!Kelvin Thompson, Ed.D.kelvin@ucf.edu (connect to faculty dev. group)http://twitter.com/kthompsohttps://profiles.google.com/drkelvinthompsonSlides: http://bit.ly/suny12_thompson http://bit.ly/blendkit