Centering Student Success on Information Literacy: One Institution’s Information Literacy Modules
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Centering Student Success on Information Literacy: One Institution’s Information Literacy Modules

on

  • 558 views

Presentation at the 2013 annual meeting of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC).

Presentation at the 2013 annual meeting of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC).

Statistics

Views

Total Views
558
Views on SlideShare
309
Embed Views
249

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

1 Embed 249

http://ofcoursesonline.com 249

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Centering Student Success on Information Literacy: One Institution’s Information Literacy Modules Centering Student Success on Information Literacy: One Institution’s Information Literacy Modules Presentation Transcript

  • Centering Student Success on Information Literacy: One Institution’s Information Literacy Modules Dr. Kelvin Thompson University of Central Florida Elizabeth Killingsworth Southern Methodist University @kthompso #infolitmods @ekilling
  • http://bit.ly/thompson_sacs13
  • CONNECTING TO INFORMATION View slide
  • All Rights Reserved by Flickr user The Great Work Used with permission. http://www.flickr.com/photos/graywolfouroboros/7000028698 View slide
  • “A Wall of Books” by mikecogh on Flickr CC BY 2.0 license http://www.flickr.com/photos/activeside/2367540964/
  • “Personal Ecosystem” by ActiveSide on Flickr CC BY 2.0 license http://www.flickr.com/photos/activeside/2367540964/
  • 1 Internet Minute: 2012 v. 2013 Data: GP Bullhound, Intel, Facebook, Twitter Quartz All Rights Reserved by Quartz Used with permission. http://qz.com/150861/a-snapshot-of-one-minute-on-the-internet-today-and-in-2012
  • Students “Very Likely to Use…” • • • • • • • • • Google, etc. (94%) Wikipedia, etc. (75%) YouTube, etc. (52%) Their peers (42%) Cliff Notes, etc. (41%) News sites of major news organizations (25%) Print or electronic textbooks (18%) Online databases (EBSCO, etc.) (17%) A research librarian (16%) http://bit.ly/pewreport_full
  • “…the internet has opened up a vast world of information for today’s students, yet students’ digital literacy skills have yet to catch up…” http://bit.ly/pew_summary
  • Employer Expectations “…baseline information competencies… knowing how and where to find information online, without much guidance, to use a search strategy beyond the first page of Google results, and to articulate a “best solution” and conclusion from all that was found.” [emphasis added] http://bit.ly/employer_study
  • For Discussion • What brought you to this session today? • What specific information literacy needs are you facing at your institution? • What is preventing you from addressing current needs?
  • ENTER UCF’S INFORMATION LITERACY MODULES
  • Origins • QEP on Information Fluency • “create or acquire accessible information literacy learning modules… easily incorporated into existing discipline courses and… available to students at all times” plus • “Alpha” stage learning object system
  • What’s So Special? Other Modules UCF’s Info Lit Mods Very short/very lengthy Complete-able in one sitting Extra-curricular Designed for integration Derivatives impractical Designed for instructor customization No assessment Competency-based assessment Limited user data Robust user data
  • What Is a Module? • A module is a complete, automated instructional resource (no instructor intervention required). • Each module based upon one identified learning outcome and contains content presentation, practice with feedback, and assessment of learning. • Each module object is completable in one sitting (no more than 30 minutes). • Designed for assigning by instructors or student self-selection
  • What is a Module? • Content presentation may be text, graphics, video, interactive media, or a combination as appropriate. • Practice/Assessment may be “traditional” (i.e., true/false or multiple choice) or “nontraditional” (e.g., simulation/authentic assessment) as appropriate.
  • Start Time End Time Time spent on each page within each section Total Elapsed Time
  • Demo Video: Module Platform http://bit.ly/module_platform See info about WCET WOW Award http://bit.ly/platform_award
  • Module Topics • • • • Topics derived from ACRL standards + felt needs 15 modules total Includes several style-guide-specific versions 12 discrete module topics with terminal learning objectives guiding assessments • “Avoiding Plagiarism” remains most assigned/completed module See topics/outcomes http://bit.ly/infolit_topics
  • Faculty Use Cases • • • • • Reference material (no record of completion) Completion "check off" (no connection to grades) Extra credit opportunity Score contributes to grade of another assignment Stand-alone graded assignment See elaboration at http://bit.ly/infolit_faculty
  • Timeline Year One (2007-2008): 4 modules Year Two (2008-2009): 4 new modules (8 total) Year Three (2009-2010): 4 new modules (12 total) Year Four (2010-2011): Add question bank Year Five (2011-2012): HTML 5 + 1 new module Year Six (2012-2013): 1 new module (14 total) Year Seven (2013-2014): 1 new module (15 total) Note: Revisions/maintenance annually
  • Terminology • Module = complete, automated instructional resource (no instructor intervention required). • Instance = module version provided to one group of students with group-specific settings • Completion = submission of an assessment attempt
  • How Are We Doing? Between June 23, 2008 – September 30, 2013 there have been: 150,882 "completions" by 29,010 students taught by 349 faculty who created 5645 instances of 15 modules with an average score of 84.6% across all modules’ summative assessments In end-of-term questionnaires... •Most faculty say they assign modules as stand-alone graded assignments. •On average, faculty report moderate impact on student knowledge/skills. •Few technical problems. (6% of student respondents indicate problems hindering completion. Tech support logs show far fewer numbers.) •On average, students say they have prior experience with content but get value from practice/feedback and find that the summative assessments accurately gauge their competence.
  • SUPPORT
  • http://infolit.ucf.edu
  • Tiered Help Desk CDL Developers
  • An Institutional Pilot BADGING THE INFOLITMODS
  • InfoLitMods Year One (2008-2009) • 13,840 assessment completions by • 4,433 students in • 422 course sections taught or led by • 94 faculty members who created • 430 instances of • 4 information literacy modules with an • average score of 85.30% across all modules' summative assessments.
  • InfoLitMods Year Four (2011-2012) • 38,423 assessment completions by • 8,082 students in • 159 unique courses taught or led by • 160 faculty members who created • 1275 instances of • 13 information literacy modules with an • average score of 85.19% across all modules' summative assessments.
  • What Can I Read? BADGING MINI-PRIMER
  • http://bit.ly/CT_badge
  • http://bit.ly/7things_badges
  • Structure of Pilot Project HOW DOES IT WORK?
  • http://credly.com
  • So How’s It Going? Initial Findings (as of 11/13/2013)
  • Initial Data 11,254 - assessments that should have delivered a badge 11,566 - badges sent via institutional email addresses 4039 - individual students who’ve earned badges 53 - students earning badges from non-assigned mods 56 (10+ students) - Number of badges claimed via Credly
  • Observations • Earners driven by assignment (currently) • Watching for student-driven uptick later • Potential value in each phase of badging: ○ Notification email ○ Claiming (“Save and Share”) ○ Making public ○ Linking to specific badges
  • CURRENT STATUS
  • Maintenance Mode • Funding cuts after 5+ years • New development on hiatus • Maintenance = Annual review/revision
  • Guiding Principles/Lessons Learned BOILING IT DOWN
  • Guiding Principles/Lessons Learned • • • • Student-centered Faculty-focused Technology-enabled Design-conscious See expanded list at http://bit.ly/infolit_principles
  • Excerpted Principles/Lessons • Look for complementary partnership(s) • Ground modules in what students need to do • Strategically align with faculty (make teaching role easier) • Get module topics right • Get granularity right • Collect data constantly See expanded list at http://bit.ly/infolit_principles
  • Your Personal Action Plan • Reflect upon today’s session • Review your notes • Identify one or more ideas you can put into action • Write down how you will apply the idea • Tell one other person what you plan to do • Discuss 30-60-90 feasibility • Exchange contact info and plan to touch base
  • QUESTIONS? COMMENTS? DISCUSSION? 54
  • Follow-Up Dr. Kelvin Thompson kelvin@ucf.edu http://about.me/drkelvinthompson Elizabeth Killingsworth elizabethk@smu.edu @ekilling http://bit.ly/thompson_sacs13