Freshwater Matters July2013

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Freshwater Matters July2013

  1. 1. Freshwater Matters What’s happening at the FBA? Inland Waters awarded impact factor The journal Inland Waters, which is published by the FBA on behalf of the International Society of Limnology (SIL), has just been awarded its first Impact Factor. The Impact Factor (for 2012) is 1.533, which is an excellent start for a new journal. If you are interested in reading papers published in the journal, the plenary lectures from the previous Congress are available as open-access on the journal website (Vol. 1 (1)), as are all Research Briefs; SIL members are entitled to free access to other papers, with journal subscriptions also available for non- SIL members and institutions. Visit the journal website for more details: https:// www.fba.org.uk/journals/index.php/IW. Latest issue of Freshwater Reviews published The latest issue of the FBA journal Freshwater Reviews (Vol. 6 (1)) has now been published, with a paper by former FBA Director on family-level keys to freshwater fly (Diptera) larvae. A list of contents and abstracts can be viewed online at: https://www.fba.org.uk/journals/index.php/FRJ/issue/view/113. Full-text articles can be downloaded by subscribers, with all articles made open access after 36 months. If you do not currently subscribe and wish to have access to the journal, please email info@fba.org.uk or recommend the journal to your library at https:// www.fba.org.uk/journals/index.php/FRJ/user/recommendLibrary. Gilson Le Cren Memorial Award 2014: £4000 grant for research from the FBA Looking for a small research grant? Thanks to a bequest from the former FBA Director, David Le Cren, the Hugh Cary Gilson Memorial Award has been re- named the Gilson Le Cren Memorial Award. The award will continue to operate in the same way, with an annual grant (up to £4000) given by the FBA to support scientific research into freshwater biology. Applications for the 2014 award will be accepted between 15 October and 15 November 2013. Application is open to FBA members in good standing who joined the FBA on or before 1 July 2013. The award will be made in April 2014 and last for a period of 12 months. Visit the FBA website for terms and conditions, and more details about the application process (http://www.fba.org.uk/gilson-le-cren-memorial-award). Hire FBA facilities for your meeting, field-/training-course, or research Looking for an inspiring venue for your conference, meeting or field course, or to hire laboratory or experimental facilities? The FBA has a diverse range of facilities available for hire at two sites in Dorset (the River Laboratory) and Cumbria July 2013 Freshwater Matters is a monthly electronic bulletin of the most recent freshwater news from around the world, compiled by the Freshwater Biological Association (FBA). It includes updates of what is happening at the FBA and ways to get involved. Contents What’s happening at the FBA? This month’s articles River dredging reduces fish numbers and diversity Small dam construction to reduce greenhouse emissions is causing ecosystem disruption Farming carbon: study reveals potent carbon-storage potential of human-made wetlands Panama expects benefits from world’s first gm salmon Current affairs make life hard for stickleback dads Darwin’s frogs are in steep decline Scientists turn to the streets for help in monitoring waterways Mekong giant catfish under threat from new Xayaburi dam Plunging fish numbers linked to dam releases Blue Lake in Australia remains unchanged for 7,500 years
  2. 2. (Windermere). These include (but are not limited to) conference suites, office facilities, laboratories, hatchery facilities, experimental channels, and access to sites such as lowland chalk rivers (Dorset) and lakes/tarns (Cumbria). Facilities are available for short or long-term use. For more information, please see our website http://www.fba.org.uk/research-conference-facilities, or contact us by email info@fba.org.uk or telephone (+44 (0)1929 405111 for Dorset, +44 (0) 15394 42468 for Cumbria). We look forward to hearing from you! This month’s articles River dredging reduces fish numbers and diversity Dredging rivers can reduce populations of fish and overall aquatic diversity according to research published this month in the journal Freshwater Biology. The study expands our understanding of the effects of dredging by explicitly examining impacts on deeper sections of rivers. http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/06/130610113008.htm Small dam construction to reduce greenhouse emissions is causing ecosystem disruption The construction of small dams to provide power and reduce greenhouse gas emissions may be causing significant losses of habitat and biodiversity according to results from a five year study. The study concludes that per megawatt hour the impact of small dams can be far greater than that of a single large main channel dam. http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/06/130618125114.htm Farming carbon: study reveals potent carbon-storage potential of human- made wetlands As well as providing benefits to the wider environment by trapping agrochemicals, artificial wetlands can play a key role in accumulating carbon according to research published in the Journal of Environmental Quality. Researchers studying two artificial wetlands next to agricultural land in Ohio found that they accumulated carbon at a rate of one ton per year, far faster than even natural wetland systems. http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/06/130620132116.htm Panama expects benefits from world’s first gm salmon This month, the US Food and Drug Administration is expected to licence a rapidly growing strain of Atlantic salmon that would become the world’s first commercially sold genetically modified animal. http://www.enn.com/sustainability/article/46085 Current affairs make life hard for stickleback dads The heavy rain this spring may have made life a little harder for male three-spined sticklebacks. The male of the species constructs a nest of algae, sand and debris glued together with a protein called “spiggin” that they produce in their kidneys. However, the increased flow rates in rivers mean that the fish has had to construct stronger nests, requiring more energy, which in turn may impact the number of young they can produce. http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/06/130614082506.htm Darwin’s frogs are in steep decline A unique species of frog that swallows its young at the tadpole stage is at risk of extinction according to research published in PLoS ONE. Darwin’s frog is found in Chile’s temperate forests, however habitat loss and fragmentation has led to a sharp decline in the species over the last decade. http://news.yahoo.com/darwins-frogs-steep-decline-210200741.html Scientists turn to the streets for help in monitoring waterways A crowd sourcing project in the US aims to employ citizen scientists to help monitor water levels across three states. The project, called CrowdHydrology,
  3. 3. provides people with a tool to collect information from gauging stations and report it back to a central data store where it can be freely accessed by anyone. It is hoped that the project will allow more detailed monitoring of rivers as traditional funding sources are put under pressure. http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2013-06/uab-stt061713.php Mekong giant catfish under threat from new Xayaburi dam A planned dam on the lower Mekong River threatens the survival of the Mekong giant catfish according to a study commissioned by WWF. When constructed the dam will form an impassable barrier to the fish, preventing it from reaching spawning grounds. Although protected by a number of laws, populations of the catfish have severely declined over the last decades and it is thought that the project may push the species to extinction. http://www.practicalfishkeeping.co.uk/content.php?sid=5780 Plunging fish numbers linked to dam releases A significant decline in the number of fish in Australia’s Murray-Darling Basin may be linked to the release of dam water that is too cold for species to breed in. The research, published in Freshwater Biology, shows that 90% of golden perch breed in unregulated rivers that naturally dry up in the hot summer months. This contrasts with stretches of regulated river where the constant flow of cold water may inhibit breeding and reduce the amount of available food. http://esciencenews.com/articles/2013/06/11/plunging.fish.numbers.linked.dam. releases Blue Lake in Australia remains unchanged for 7,500 years Some good news as a study in this month’s Freshwater Biology details the remarkable history of Blue Lake, which according to historical records assembled from fossils and algae, has remained in pristine condition for the last 7,500 years. The stability of the lake over such a long period of time makes it almost unique globally. http://frenchtribune.com/teneur/1318545-blue-lake-australia-remains- unchanged-7500-years Please forward this bulletin to any of your colleagues who may be interested!

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