Managing an Academic Career

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  • K, can #1 link to the next slide?
  • Why Write?What obstacles do you face as a writer?How can you support your research and writing goals?
  • Katelin—do you know how to make the 2nd column to appear after a click? I also couldn’t make the bullets the bule color or arrange the spacing the same. I’d be happier with a more child friendly font for 2nd column
  • Research suggests that the bulk of scholarship is produced by a relatively small number of scholars: only about 10 to 20 percent of our colleagues appear to be responsible for the bulk of what's published (Jalongo; Boyer; Sykes; Simonton). In "Why Academicians Don't Write," Robert Boice and Ferdinand Jones conclude "The median number of scholarly publications for even the most prolific disciplines like psychology is zero. . . . Most academicians who do write contribute infrequently; as few as 10 percent of writers in specific areas account for over 50 percent of the literature. . ." (568).
  • K, do you know how to hyperlink within .ppt slides? Would like to jump from these to slides later and then jump back. E.g
  • Source: Fiske, Donald W. & Louis Fogg. American Psychologist (May 1990): 591-597.
  • E.G.: “Gifted scholars know what they will write about before writing. They rarely revise, etc.” Because writers should think and then write, they should delay writing until they have completed their research. Once written, the word is final.
  • 10 minutes here…just to freewrite…..on a personal level
  • Would like a pic of a grandma picking up a car to save a baby
  • Can you animate this so beleiving overtakes doubting?
  • http://www.bowker.com/assets/downloads/products/isbn_output_2002-2011.pdf
  • Can you do a screenshot of http://www.bowker.com/assets/downloads/products/isbn_output_2002-2011.pdfI’d like to get the first and last columns if possible
  • What research shows about one group of faculty:In the year prior to the intervention, these faculty wrote the way they always wrote and 15 percent of them finished manuscripts.In the year of the intervention, 100 percent finished manuscripts (Boice 1992).
  • What research shows about one group of faculty:In the year prior to the intervention, these faculty wrote the way they always wrote and 15 percent of them finished manuscripts.In the year of the intervention, 100 percent finished manuscripts (Boice 1992).
  • Kenneth Burke writes: Imagine that you enter a parlor. You come late. When you arrive, others have long preceded you, and they are engaged in a heated discussion, a discussion too heated for them to pause and tell you exactly what it is about. In fact, the discussion had already begun long before any of them got there, so that no one present is qualified to retrace for you all the steps that had gone before. You listen for a while, until you decide that you have caught the tenor of the argument; then you put in your oar. Someone answers; you answer him; another comes to your defense; another aligns himself against you, to either the embarrassment or gratification of your opponent, depending upon the quality of your ally's assistance. However, the discussion is interminable. The hour grows late, you must depart. And you do depart, with the discussion still vigorously in progress. The Philosophy of Literary Form 110-111Be aware of Scholarly Discussions.
  • Kenneth Burke writes: Imagine that you enter a parlor. You come late. When you arrive, others have long preceded you, and they are engaged in a heated discussion, a discussion too heated for them to pause and tell you exactly what it is about. In fact, the discussion had already begun long before any of them got there, so that no one present is qualified to retrace for you all the steps that had gone before. You listen for a while, until you decide that you have caught the tenor of the argument; then you put in your oar. Someone answers; you answer him; another comes to your defense; another aligns himself against you, to either the embarrassment or gratification of your opponent, depending upon the quality of your ally's assistance. However, the discussion is interminable. The hour grows late, you must depart. And you do depart, with the discussion still vigorously in progress. The Philosophy of Literary Form 110-111Be aware of Scholarly Discussions.
  • Attend conferences, write book reviews, and get to know leading editors, researchers, and scholars in your field.Networking cannot substitute for good research, but good research cannot substitute for networking either. Blog Rolls/Academic.Edu/Twitter: You can't get a job or a grant or any recognition for your accomplishments unless you keep up to date with the people in your community (Agee)
  • Maybe get a 1940s pic of a woman explaining clearniless Is next to godliness
  • BlogsWikisFacebookTwitterAcademia Linked-in Content Management SystemsWordpressJoomlaSharepointBlogger
  • Make hyperlinks
  • Exercise background pls

Managing an Academic Career Managing an Academic Career Presentation Transcript

  • Joe MoxleyProfessor of English | Director of Composition University of South Florida http://joemoxley.org
  •  1. Besides a style or documentation manual, what writing resources do you own or regularly consult? 2. When was the last writing course you took? What did you learn about writing in the course? 3. Do you tend to write scholarly material (check one of the following) a. Once a day, every day, for at least one hour. b. Two or three times a week, or three hours a week. c. Once a week, usually on weekends d. Christmas break and other holidays e. Rarely 4. What questions and issues about writing or publishing would you like me to address in today’s workshop? In other words, what do you want to get out of today’s session?
  •  Use #dailywriting at Twitter for the back channel… View slide
  • Online/Free Publish, Don’t Perish Writing Commons Networking on the Network Books Writing Without Teachers Advice for New Faculty Members Style: Lessons in Clarity and Grace View slide
  •  Identify and overcome the obstacles you face as a writer… Kickstart “momo” To prioritize research projects and achieve your scholarly goals try process writing, a writing log, a commitment contract, a document planner, new writing tools/spaces, and a career research planner…
  • For practical reasons… For personal and imaginative Write to Discover reasons… Understand/recall material ‣For pleasure or to gratify "the better need” need” Improve teaching ‣Join the academic community, "the invisible Improve career options college.“ and earn money (e.g., grants, textbooks, c ‣To imagine ommercial articles) characters, ideas, places, conce pts that are beyond your Tenure/Promotion/Career immediate reach Advancement ‣To advance knowledge
  •  DeAngelo’s study of 22,500 faculty revealed that among faculty at four-year institutions, sixteen percent of professors spend zero hours per week on scholarship and writing and forty-eight percent spend 4 hours or fewer (DeAngelo, et al. 2009; 30). Additionally, thirty percent have not published a manuscript in the last two years (DeAngelo, et al. 2009; 36).DeAngelo, L., S. Hurtado, J. H. Pryor, K.R. Kelly, J. L. Santos and W. S. Korn. 2009. The American college teacher: National norms for the 2007-2008 HERI faculty survey. Los Angeles: UCLA Higher Education Research Institute.
  •  A study of 18 Australian university economics departments found the average academic published less than one peer- reviewed journal article every two years, and one-quarter had not published over a five-year period (Harris, 1990). The largest study in this area involved a survey of 890 Australian academics in 18 tertiary institutions and included those from the humanities, commerce, science, health science and engineering disciplines (Ramsden, 1994). During the five-year study period, publication rates were low and variable. A high proportion of publications were contributed by a small number of staff; conversely, 20% of academics published nothing over the period. Source: McGrail, Rickard, Jones, Publish or perish: a systematic review of interventions to increase academic publication rates
  •  Theres too much academic writing—and much of what’s written is written poorly. Writing is Aversive. As academics, we need large chunks of time to write. Binge writing is preferable to freewriting or writing regularly even if it leads to manic depressive behaviors Voice. Academic authors should eschew the first person….they should avoid revealing personal experiences in their writing. Isolation. Writing should be a lonely craft conducted by introverts. Writers work best sitting alone at their desks. They should look into their souls and discover their personal voice as opposed to responding to market considerations
  • The peer-review process is fair and objective.After examining “402 reviews of 153 papers submittedto 12 editors of American Psychological Associationjournals” Douglas Fiske and Louis Fogg concluded “ Inthe typical case, two reviews of the same paper had nocritical point in common.”It seemed that reviewers did not overtly disagree onparticular points; instead, they wrote about differenttopics, each making points that were appropriate andaccurate. As a consequence, their recommendationsabout editorial decisions showed hardly anyagreement” (591).
  •  Lack of understanding of writing processes. Source: The Writing Process, Enokson, flickr
  • Double-entry Exercise: Folda piece of paper lengthwisein half. On left handside, identify obstacles towriting; on the right handside, identify solutions … What obstacles do youface in your efforts toachieve your academicwriting goals? What can you do toovercome the obstacles youface as an academic author? Sisyphus
  • ‣ Contextual Constraints ‣ Believing vs. Doubting ‣ Commitment Contracts ‣ Networking ‣ New Authoring Tools ‣ New Publishing AlternativesSource: pittiglian2005, flickr
  • Prioritize. What work promises impact? Whats most realistic? Collaborative Constraints Financial Constraints Rhetorical Considerations Personal Constraints Interpersonal Relations, ConflictingContextual Considerations Budget, Equipment, Technology Text, Audience, Voice & Purpose Schedule and Time Expectations
  •  Think rhetorically. Understand criteria for tenure and promotion decisions What counts as research and scholarship? What expectations guide the salary, tenure, and promotion decisions?
  •  The activity requires a high level of discipline-related expertise. The activity breaks new ground, is innovative. The activity can be replicated or elaborated. The work and its results can be documented. The work and its results can be peer-reviewed. The activity has significance or impact. (Source: Diamond and Adam, qtd. In Diamond 17)
  •  Scholarship of Discovery Scholarship of Application Scholarship of Teaching Scholarship of Service (Grant Writing) (Remediations)
  • Visualize success.While composing,ignore negativethoughts (such as, Idon’t have enoughtime, this is a stupididea, I’ll never getthis published).
  • Believing DoubtingBelieving Doubting
  •  Put yourself on the spot. Challenge yourself
  •  Coauthor and co-edit projects. Consider editing an anthology of original essays. Create a disciplinary Website or Blog Volunteer your services as a consulting reader for the journals academic book publishers, and granting agencies in your discipline. Have your research proposals and research designs critiqued by established scholars before conducting a study. Use the peer-review process to solicit tough criticisms.
  •  Total Number of New Book Titles and Editions: ◦ 2002: 247,777 ◦ 2003: 266,322 ◦ 2004: 285,523 ◦ 2005: 282,500 ◦ 2006: 396,352 ◦ 2007: 407,646 ◦ 2008:561,580 ◦ 2009: 1,335,475 ◦ 2010: 4,134,519
  • Believing: Publishing Trends,2011 http://2.bp.blogspot.com/--3yerSR7MV8/T0xNS32eOtI/AAAAAAAABkI/Note: For a total book count, see Bowker,http://www.bowker.com/assets/downloads/products/isbn_output_2002-2011.pdf
  • Manuscript pages written or revised per yearControlsExperimentals I (30 min/day) Boice (1989) Note: The “father” of commitment contracts in the context is Bob Boice, who wrote numerous books and articles on the topic. Also see Moxley’s Publish, Don’t Perish
  •  In one report, Boice (1989) reported that 100% of the faculty who used commitment contracts finished manuscripts in contrast to the 15% who completed projects without commitment contracts. McGrail et.al’s meta analysis of 17 studies compared pre- and post- data for faculty-based writing programs (monthly meetings; writing courses; individual coaching). Each of these studies had between5 and 60 participants each. Most of the faculty writing programs doubled the productivity of the writers (and in some instances the perceived quality) of the writing. An ongoing study by Tara Gray has found her workshops triple faculty members’ writing productivity.Sources: ◦ McGrail, R. M., Rickard, C. M., & Jones, R. (2006). Publish or perish: A systematic review of interventions to increase academic publication rates. Higher Education Research and Development, 25(1), 19-35.  Publish & Flourish: How does this scholarly writing program affect writing quality and scholarly productivity? Tara Gray, Laura Madson, A. Jane Birch.
  • Log time spent researching and writing “I started keeping a more detailed chart which also showed how many pages I had written by the end of every working day. I am not sure why I started keeping such records. I suspect that it was because as a freelance writer entirely on my own, without employer or deadline, I wanted to create disciplines for myself, ones that were quilt-making when ignored. A chart on the wall served me as such a discipline, its figures scolding me or encouraging me.” - Irving Wallace
  • Stop writing at reasonable intervals “Timely stopping is more difficult and important than starting. Without the skill of stopping on time, writers cannot become productive workers who enjoy writing. Why? If they cannot break the momentum of busily, urgently doing things that hold them in a trance-like state, writers cannot being (or end) writing sessions on time. And if they cannot stop writing when they have done enough for the day, before diminishing returns set in, they make writing aversive and more difficult to resume on the next scheduled occasion.” - Robert Boice
  • JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC Begin draft Sample Text Sample Text On Time! Sample Text
  • Source: Palmquist, Mike. Joining the Conversation: Writingin College and Behind
  •  Play an active role on listservs Join communities such as the COS (Community of Science) Subscribe to news aggregators such as http://www.scoop.it or Google Alerts. Explore ways new digital tools, such as social bookmarking or social books, can help you track and participate in conversations
  • 1. Choose someone you wish to approach and read their work with some care;2. Make sure that your article cites their work in some substantial way (in addition to all your other citations);3. Mail the person a copy of your article;4. Include a low-key, one-page cover letter that says something intelligent about their work. If your work and theirs could be seen to overlap, include a concise statement of the relationship you see between them. The tone of this letter counts. Project ordinary, calm self-confidence.
  •  “The people who live in the intersection of social worlds, are at higher risk of having good ideas” Burt, 2005, p. 90Source: Anderson, Terry. “Living, Learning, and Source: dan jazzia, Social Network-vector illustration, flickr Researching in a Networked World”
  •  Different types of information and knowledge perspectives Different ways of viewing the world or a specific problem interpretation Different ways of categorizing a problem or partitioning perspectives Heuristics yielding different ways of generating solutions to problems Predictive Models-different ways of inferring causes and effects (Fisher, L. 2009) Source: Anderson, Terry. “Living, Learning, and Researching in a Networked World”
  • For a thorough reviewof composingprocesses, please seethe discussion of“believing” and“doubting” at WritingCommons
  •  “The positive force is the surprise of discovery. Writers are born at the moment they write what they do not expect…They are hooked because the act of writing that, in the past, had revealed their ignorance, now reveals that they know more than they had thought they knew.” -Donald Murray
  • Research Plan Idea/Brainstorming Job PortfolioWriting Log Space Curriculum Vitae AnnotatedConference Bibliographies/ Major Projects Folders Proposals Endnote Libraries
  • Learn NewAuthoring ToolsBamboo Dirthttp://dirt.projectbamboo.org/ is an excellentresource for keeping upwith emerging tools.
  • Total Trade Total Overall: $503.5M in Jan 2012; $396.0M in Jan 2011; +27.1% increase
Total Adult Trade: $323.0M in Jan 2012; $277.4M in Jan 2011; +16.4% increase
Total Children/YA: $128.2M in Jan 2012; $71.0M in Jan 2011; +80.5% increase
Total Religious: $52.4M in Jan 2012; $47.7M in Jan 2011; +9.9% Source: AAAP, http://ebookreader.com/news/american-publishing- industry-goes-up-january-2012-aap-stats/
  •  Peter Suber  Nicholas Negroponte Jay David Bolter  Mark Wiesner Howard Rheingold  Kathleen Mckinney Chris Anson  Stuart Selber Yockai Benkler  Matt Barton Martin Weller  Cheryl Ball Danah Boyd  Bill Gates Richard Miller  Dennis Baron Alex Reid  Cory Doctorow Julian Dibbell  Content (More Links...)
  • Comprehensive Informal Self Networked Self Teaching Self Uncontainable self Self•Broadcast style •Narrowcast •Narrowcast •Targeted •Uncontrolled•Fixed •Interactive •Interactive •Interactive and •Unmonitoredpresentation collaborative •Professional •Professional •Multi-platform•Focus on and private •Professionalachievements •Extra- blurredand expertise institutional •Inter/Intra/Extr •Extra- a/-institutional•Framed through •Multi-platform institutionalthe institution •Multi-platformSoruce: Barbour, K., & Marshall D. (2012). The academic online: Constructing persona through the WorldWide Web. First Monday, 17(9).http://firstmonday.org/htbin/cgiwrap/bin/ojs/index.php/fm/article/view/3969/3292
  • On a personal level, When will you write? How many hours/words per day? (Be reasonable!) What new writing processes will you explore? What will be your commitment contract? What scholarly conversations interest you? What journals, books, websites will you review? When? Identify new tools/communities to explore. What new tools would you like to explore this year? What tools do you need? What communities will you join, even if just lurking? How will you network—more than you have in the past? What new media will you try? How will you put yourself on the spot? Possible Project(s):On a community level, What disciplinary or professional organizations might you join? Would it be helpful to get an e-coach (e.g, : http://www.academicladder.com/ [$70/month]) What could EPCC do to facilitate a culture for writers/researchers? Whom can you collaborate with?
  •  Decide on a publisher—better yet, a list of five to ten possible publishers—before writing the report or conducting the research. Determine each journal’s ranking. Is it a refereed, first-tier or second-tier journal? Be reasonable. Submit documents to appropriate places. While in general it makes sense to submit to the most distinguished journal or publisher, you may first need to develop a batting average. If appropriate, query, e-mail, or talk to the editor before submitting the essay.
  •  Don’t accept everything you hear. Ignore the cranks. Like bad drivers, there are too many cranks for you to police. Be your own worst critic. No one will take your work as seriously as you do. Don’t try to critique your work at the last minute.
  •  Don’t take criticism personally. Focus on the positive. Don’t waste your energies writing to editors and telling them why they were fools to reject your ideas. Instead, place your energies into moving forward. Either immediately revise the manuscript or send it back out for consideration elsewhere.
  •  Don’t try to critique your work at the last minute. This is impossible. When writing, don’t worry about criticism. When you submit something, be sure it’s as good as you can make it, or, at the very least, that it won’t embarrass you. Get to know the editors who decide whether or not to publish your work. Call the editor if you are unsure about a reviewer’s comments. Develop a realistic research plan. Update your plan regularly Archive your efforts and achievements.
  • A writer is not so much someone whohas something to say as he (or she) issomeone who has found a process thatwill bring about new things he (or she)would not have thought of if he (or she)had not started to say them. --WilliamStafford
  • To identify publishable, academic projects, tackle the major journals in your field—one at a time. Go through the last years ten years of each journal, and keep notes on the following questions:1. What major theories are scholars debating in your discipline?2. What are the primary research questions in your discipline?3. What methodologies are considered appropriate?4. What important new research trends can you identify?
  • 1. Given there’s no one ideal way to create/compose and given our habitual ways of communicating may not be most effective, take some time each day to reflect on your writing processes. Write in response to these writing process questions in your writing journal.2. Try a different way of researching, composing, publishing….
  •  Found at ScholarsPublish.com: Introductory Writing: Questionnaire Writing Calendar-log your research work on a daily basis Process Writing- respond to these process questions Career Research Planner- create a research planner Document Planner- try using a document planner for one research project
  •  Chris Anderson on Peer Production and Video Innovation http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LnQcCgS7aPQ "Ten Lessons in Digital Scholarship in Ten Videos" Martin Wellerhttp://www.slideshare.net/mweller/ten-lessons-in-digital-scholarship "How (and Why) to Participate in a Tweetchat" Professor Hackerhttp://chronicle.com/blogs/profhacker/how-and-why-to-participate-in-a- tweetchat/42380 "Why 15 Minutes?" Professor Hackerhttp://chronicle.com/blogs/profhacker/why-15-minutes/40196 "Do You Have Something to Write With?" Professor Hackerhttp://chronicle.com/blogs/profhacker/do-you-have-something-to-write-with/36828 "Learn About Yourself with AskMeEvery.com“http://chronicle.com/blogs/profhacker/learn-about-yourself-with-askmeevery- com/36382