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Engineering Ethics: Is It Black & White Or Is It Gray?
Engineering Ethics: Is It Black & White Or Is It Gray?
Engineering Ethics: Is It Black & White Or Is It Gray?
Engineering Ethics: Is It Black & White Or Is It Gray?
Engineering Ethics: Is It Black & White Or Is It Gray?
Engineering Ethics: Is It Black & White Or Is It Gray?
Engineering Ethics: Is It Black & White Or Is It Gray?
Engineering Ethics: Is It Black & White Or Is It Gray?
Engineering Ethics: Is It Black & White Or Is It Gray?
Engineering Ethics: Is It Black & White Or Is It Gray?
Engineering Ethics: Is It Black & White Or Is It Gray?
Engineering Ethics: Is It Black & White Or Is It Gray?
Engineering Ethics: Is It Black & White Or Is It Gray?
Engineering Ethics: Is It Black & White Or Is It Gray?
Engineering Ethics: Is It Black & White Or Is It Gray?
Engineering Ethics: Is It Black & White Or Is It Gray?
Engineering Ethics: Is It Black & White Or Is It Gray?
Engineering Ethics: Is It Black & White Or Is It Gray?
Engineering Ethics: Is It Black & White Or Is It Gray?
Engineering Ethics: Is It Black & White Or Is It Gray?
Engineering Ethics: Is It Black & White Or Is It Gray?
Engineering Ethics: Is It Black & White Or Is It Gray?
Engineering Ethics: Is It Black & White Or Is It Gray?
Engineering Ethics: Is It Black & White Or Is It Gray?
Engineering Ethics: Is It Black & White Or Is It Gray?
Engineering Ethics: Is It Black & White Or Is It Gray?
Engineering Ethics: Is It Black & White Or Is It Gray?
Engineering Ethics: Is It Black & White Or Is It Gray?
Engineering Ethics: Is It Black & White Or Is It Gray?
Engineering Ethics: Is It Black & White Or Is It Gray?
Engineering Ethics: Is It Black & White Or Is It Gray?
Engineering Ethics: Is It Black & White Or Is It Gray?
Engineering Ethics: Is It Black & White Or Is It Gray?
Engineering Ethics: Is It Black & White Or Is It Gray?
Engineering Ethics: Is It Black & White Or Is It Gray?
Engineering Ethics: Is It Black & White Or Is It Gray?
Engineering Ethics: Is It Black & White Or Is It Gray?
Engineering Ethics: Is It Black & White Or Is It Gray?
Engineering Ethics: Is It Black & White Or Is It Gray?
Engineering Ethics: Is It Black & White Or Is It Gray?
Engineering Ethics: Is It Black & White Or Is It Gray?
Engineering Ethics: Is It Black & White Or Is It Gray?
Engineering Ethics: Is It Black & White Or Is It Gray?
Engineering Ethics: Is It Black & White Or Is It Gray?
Engineering Ethics: Is It Black & White Or Is It Gray?
Engineering Ethics: Is It Black & White Or Is It Gray?
Engineering Ethics: Is It Black & White Or Is It Gray?
Engineering Ethics: Is It Black & White Or Is It Gray?
Engineering Ethics: Is It Black & White Or Is It Gray?
Engineering Ethics: Is It Black & White Or Is It Gray?
Engineering Ethics: Is It Black & White Or Is It Gray?
Engineering Ethics: Is It Black & White Or Is It Gray?
Engineering Ethics: Is It Black & White Or Is It Gray?
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Engineering Ethics: Is It Black & White Or Is It Gray?

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http://blueelephantconsulting.com - In this presentation, Dr. Anderson shows that the techniques that we generally use to make decisions may not work when it comes to making good ethical decisions. …

http://blueelephantconsulting.com - In this presentation, Dr. Anderson shows that the techniques that we generally use to make decisions may not work when it comes to making good ethical decisions. Instead, Dr. Anderson provides a 5-step framework for engineers to use when they are faced with having to make a good ethical decision.

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  • Robert Allen Stanford was a prominent financier, philanthropist, and sponsor of professional sports who is in prison awaiting trial on charges his investment company was a massive Ponzi scheme and fraud. Stanford was the chairman of the now defunct Stanford Financial Group of Companies.
  • The Ashtabula River Railroad Disaster was a derailment caused by the failure of a bridge over the Ashtabula River in far northeastern Ohio. On December 29, 1876, at about 7:30 pm, two locomotives hauling 11 railcars of the Lake Shore and Michigan Southern Railway carrying 159 passengers plunged into the river in deep snow when the bridge gave way beneath them. The accident killed ninety-two people. The coroner's report found that the bridge, designed by the railroad company president, had been improperly designed and inadequately inspected.The Boston Molasses Disaster occurred on January 15, 1919, in the North End neighborhood of Boston, Massachusetts in the United States. A large molasses storage tank burst, and a wave of molasses rushed through the streets at an estimated 35 mph, killing 21 and injuring 150. At about 12:30 in the afternoon near KeanySquare, at 529 Commercial Street, a molasses tank 50 fttall, 90 ftin diameter and containing as much as 2,300,000 US gal collapsed. The tank was constructed poorly and tested insufficiently. An inquiry after the disaster revealed that Arthur Jell, who oversaw the construction, neglected basic safety tests, such as filling the tank with water to check for leaks. When filled with molasses, the tank leaked so badly that it was painted brown to hide the leaks.
  • If our ethics are not based on feelings, religion, law, accepted social practice, or science, what are they based on? Philosophers and ethicists have helped us answer this critical question. They have suggested at least five different sources of ethical standards we should use.
  • Some ethicists emphasize that the ethical action is the one that provides the most good or does the least harm, or, to put it another way, produces the greatest balance of good over harm. The ethical corporate action, then, is the one that produces the greatest good and does the least harm for all who are affected-customers, employees, shareholders, the community, and the environment. Ethical warfare balances the good achieved in ending terrorism with the harm done to all parties through death, injuries, and destruction. The utilitarian approach deals with consequences; it tries both to increase the good done and to reduce the harm done.
  • “bum – bad, “homeless” – okOther philosophers and ethicists suggest that the ethical action is the one that best protects and respects the moral rights of those affected. This approach starts from the belief that humans have a dignity based on their human nature per se or on their ability to choose freely what they do with their lives. On the basis of such dignity, they have a right to be treated as ends and not merely as means to other ends. The list of moral rights -including the rights to make one's own choices about what kind of life to lead, to be told the truth, not to be injured, to a degree of privacy, and so on-is widely debated; some now argue that non-humans have rights, too. Also, it is often said that rights imply duties-in particular, the duty to respect others' rights.
  • Aristotle and other Greek philosophers have contributed the idea that all equals should be treated equally. Today we use this idea to say that ethical actions treat all human beings equally-or if unequally, then fairly based on some standard that is defensible. We pay people more based on their harder work or the greater amount that they contribute to an organization, and say that is fair. But there is a debate over CEO salaries that are hundreds of times larger than the pay of others; many ask whether the huge disparity is based on a defensible standard or whether it is the result of an imbalance of power and hence is unfair.
  • The Greek philosophers have also contributed the notion that life in community is a good in itself and our actions should contribute to that life. This approach suggests that the interlocking relationships of society are the basis of ethical reasoning and that respect and compassion for all others-especially the vulnerable-are requirements of such reasoning. This approach also calls attention to the common conditions that are important to the welfare of everyone. This may be a system of laws, effective police and fire departments, health care, a public educational system, or even public recreational areas.
  • A very ancient approach to ethics is that ethical actions ought to be consistent with certain ideal virtues that provide for the full development of our humanity. These virtues are dispositions and habits that enable us to act according to the highest potential of our character and on behalf of values like truth and beauty. Honesty, courage, compassion, generosity, tolerance, love, fidelity, integrity, fairness, self-control, and prudence are all examples of virtues. Virtue ethics asks of any action, "What kind of person will I become if I do this?" or "Is this action consistent with my acting at my best?"
  • There is also a comment about digital cables not making a difference and that the only difference in digital cables is the price. This is simply not the case. HDMI Licensing, LLC, the group that develops the HDMI specification, has published two different cable speeds for the current 1.3 specification: Standard Speed at 2.23 Gbps, and High Speed at 4.95 Gbps, which is known as HDMI 1.3 Category 2. For more information, go to www.hdmi.org.In fact, Steve Venuti, Vice President of Marketing for HDMI Licensing, LLC, stated in a recent Widescreen Review article:http://www2.widescreenreview.com/127venuti.pdf"...HDMI evolves as it continues to react to the demands of the marketplace. With the introduction of HDMI 1.3 in 2006, HDMI doubled the bandwidth of the specification, and with that, gave manufacturers the ability to design products that can output and receive signals at unprecedented levels...And where there is increased bandwidth, there is increased demand on the cable to deliver the HDMI signal."
  • What do you say to this woman? What do you say to an employer who calls you for a reference? What if the prospective employer was a friend? Suppose the problem was a theft? Suppose she had asked you to be a reference prior to supplying your name to her prospective employer? What values are at stake? Do some of the values conflict with one another?
  • As the newspapers put it, the collapse of his funds, which he had told clients were in fine shape, set off a chain reaction that eventually swallowed Bear Stearns itself. Mr. Cioffi was also charged with insider trading, having moved some of his own money from the funds before the end.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Engineering Ethical Decision Making Is It Black & White – Or Is It Gray?
    • 2. Engineers See The World In Black & White
    • 3. What Is Ethics? Ethics refers to standards of behavior that tell us how human beings ought to act in the many situations in which they find themselves-as friends, parents, children, citizens, businesspeople, teachers, professionals, and so on. standards of behavior = “a decision making process” Image Credit: http://ansam518.wordpress.com/2011/04/04/question-2/ Image Credit: http://www.sirlin.net/articles/slippery-slope-and-perpetual-comeback.html
    • 4. Where Did Engineering Ethics Come From? • Boston Molasses Disaster • Ashtabula River Railroad Disaster • Etc.
    • 5. Two Solutions To The Engineering Ethics Problem • License Engineers – US model: Only requires those practicing independently (i.e. consulting engineers) to be licensed, – Engineers working in industry, education, and sometimes government need not be licensed. • Professional Societies Created A Code of Ethics – National Society of Professional Engineers – American Society of Civil Engineers – IEEE
    • 6. So We’ve Got This Ethics Thing Solved, Right?
    • 7. Southwest Airline’s Ethics Problem Image Credit: http://saveadime.wordpress.com/2011/07/20/southwest-airtran-discount-fall-travel/southwest-airlines-logo1/
    • 8. What Is Ethics? 1. “Ethics has to do with what my feelings tell me is right or wrong.“ 2. “Ethics has to do with my religious beliefs.” 3. “Being ethical is doing what the law requires.” 4. “Ethics consists of the standards of behavior our society accepts.“
    • 9. Feelings = Ethics? Jared Lee Loughner • Many people tend to equate ethics with their feelings. • But being ethical is clearly not a matter of following one's feelings. • A person following his or her feelings may recoil from doing what is right. Anders Behring Breivik • In fact, feelings frequently deviate from what is ethical. Image Credit: http://www.neontommy.com/tags/representative-giffords Image Credit: http://www.nydailynews.com/news/world/galleries/explosion_rocks_downtown_oslo_norway/explosion_rocks_downtown_oslo_norway.html
    • 10. Religion = Ethics? Does ethics apply only to religious people? Religion can set high ethical standards and can provide intense motivations for ethical behavior. Ethics, however, cannot be confined to religion nor is it the same as religion.
    • 11. Following The Law = Ethics? Image Credit: http://www.confederatemercantile.com/catalog.html Image Credit: http://angelasfailure.blogspot.com/2011_04_01_archive.html
    • 12. Doing What Society Accepts = Ethics? Image Credit: http://jasonaclark.com/2009/08/06/does-anyone-else-think-this-sounds-like-nazi-germany-gop-tcot-txcot/
    • 13. Ethics Case Study: The Job Offer A graduating engineering student is interviewing with several companies for an entry-level position. He receives an attractive offer from company A. Since the job market is very competitive, he feels it unlikely that another company will give an offer, much less an attractive one. The student accepts company A’s offer and returns a signed letter of acceptance which documents the terms of the position. However, he receives an offer from company B one week afterwards. This new opportunity has a higher salary, more benefits, better advancement prospects, and a more desirable location. It is significantly better in all respects. Since only one week has past since the first acceptance was returned and the new opportunity is clearly in his professional and financial interests, he tells company A that he has changed his mind and accepts the offer of company B. Company A does not express any criticism of the student’s actions. Image Credit: http://providentstl.org/job-and-life-skills-resources/interviewmistakestoavoid.html
    • 14. Was Anyone Harmed? • REFERENCES: Relevant sections of the IEEE code • Preamble: … to the highest ethical and professional conduct … • 9. to avoid injuring others, their property, reputation, or employment by false or malicious action.
    • 15. IEEE Code Of Ethics 1. We, the members of the IEEE, in recognition of the importance of our technologies in affecting the quality of life throughout the world, and in accepting a personal obligation to our profession, its members and the communities we serve, do hereby commit ourselves to the highest ethical and professional conduct and agree: To accept responsibility in making decisions consistent with the safety, health, and welfare of the public, and to disclose promptly factors that might endanger the public or the environment; 2. To avoid real or perceived conflicts of interest whenever possible, and to disclose them to affected parties when they do exist; 3. To be honest and realistic in stating claims or estimates based on available data; 4. To reject bribery in all its forms; 5. To improve the understanding of technology; its appropriate application, and potential consequences; 6. To maintain and improve our technical competence and to undertake technological tasks for others only if qualified by training or experience, or after full disclosure of pertinent limitations; 7. To seek, accept, and offer honest criticism of technical work, to acknowledge and correct errors, and to credit properly the contributions of others; 8. To treat fairly all persons regardless of such factors as race, religion, gender, disability, age, or national origin; 9. To avoid injuring others, their property, reputation, or employment by false or malicious action; 10. To assist colleagues and co-workers in their professional development and to support them in following this code of ethics.
    • 16. Ethics & YOU! Hank Morris doing his perp walk after being indicted on 123, count ‘em, 123 counts relating to taking multi-million dollar kickbacks from those wanting to manage money for the New York State pension fund. Image Credit: http://polizeros.com/2009/03/21/daily-rogues-report-hank-morris/
    • 17. Why Identifying Ethical Standards is Hard! 2 Big Problems With Identifying Ethical Standards To Use: 1. What should we base our ethical standards on? 2. How should we apply these ethical standards to specific real life situations we face? Image Credit: http://blog.inlina.com/category/entertainment/
    • 18. Sources Of Ethical Standards The Utilitarian Approach The Rights Approach The Virtue Approach The Fairness or Justice Approach The Common Good Approach
    • 19. Source: The Utilitarian Approach Image Credit: http://www.clker.com/clipart-66899.html Image Credit: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/barackobama/4616490/US-drones-based-in-Pakistan-Senator-Dianne-Feinstein-reveals-in-apparent-gaffe.html
    • 20. Source: The Rights Approach Image Credit: http://www.humanrightsnigeria.org/human-rights-lawyer.html http://walyou.com/hobo-bed-sheets-design/
    • 21. Source: The Fairness or Justice Approach Image Credit: http://www.lostartofblogging.com/running-multiple-blogs-advantages-vs-disadvantages image Credit: http://risezine.wordpress.com/page/7/
    • 22. Source: The Common Good Approach Image Credit: http://ling.osa.pl/911/?said=3333g&q=puzzle+pieces Image Credit: http://elderlawsolution.com/elderlaw/2011/05/16/stressors-when-caring-for-elderly-parents/
    • 23. Source: The Virtue Approach Image Credit: http://qwikstep.eu/search/women-success.html image Credit: http://www.underconsideration.com/wordit/archives/virtue/
    • 24. Ethics Case Study • Your company sells cables for $250 that are just as good as $50 cables. • Your boss has asked you to create a document that confirms that your cables are worth the extra cost. • It’s not really true – what do you do? Image Credit: http://www.ohgizmo.com/2008/03/04/monster-cables-get-hung-drawn-quartered/ Image Credit: http://consumerist.com/2008/02/monster-cables-monster-ripoff-80-markups.html
    • 25. IEEE Code Of Ethics 1. We, the members of the IEEE, in recognition of the importance of our technologies in affecting the quality of life throughout the world, and in accepting a personal obligation to our profession, its members and the communities we serve, do hereby commit ourselves to the highest ethical and professional conduct and agree: To accept responsibility in making decisions consistent with the safety, health, and welfare of the public, and to disclose promptly factors that might endanger the public or the environment; 2. To avoid real or perceived conflicts of interest whenever possible, and to disclose them to affected parties when they do exist; 3. To be honest and realistic in stating claims or estimates based on available data; 4. To reject bribery in all its forms; 5. To improve the understanding of technology; its appropriate application, and potential consequences; 6. To maintain and improve our technical competence and to undertake technological tasks for others only if qualified by training or experience, or after full disclosure of pertinent limitations; 7. To seek, accept, and offer honest criticism of technical work, to acknowledge and correct errors, and to credit properly the contributions of others; 8. To treat fairly all persons regardless of such factors as race, religion, gender, disability, age, or national origin; 9. To avoid injuring others, their property, reputation, or employment by false or malicious action; 10. To assist colleagues and co-workers in their professional development and to support them in following this code of ethics.
    • 26. Ethics & YOU! Galleon Group founder Raj Rajaratnam, charged by the U.S. Justice Department and the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, accused of reaping more than $20 million by trading on inside information in a dozen companies. Image Credit: http://www.clevelandleader.com/node/10241
    • 27. A Framework for Ethical Decision Making How do you recognize an ethical issue? 1. Could this decision or situation be damaging to someone or to some group? Does this decision involve a choice between a good and bad alternative, or perhaps between two "goods" or between two "bads"? 2. Is this issue about more than what is legal or what is most efficient? If so, how? Image Credit: http://diwt.wordpress.com/2011/08/08/framework/
    • 28. Ethics Case Study: A Reference Request • A former employee who was fired due to poor quality work, absences, and lateness related to her drinking problem, informs you that she has applied for a position at another company and has already given your name as a reference. • She desperately needs a job (she is a single parent with three children), and she asks you to give her a good recommendation and not mention her drinking, which she assures you is now under control. • She also asks you to say that she voluntarily left the company to address a family medical crisis, and that the company was pleased with her work. You like this person and believe she is a good worker when she is not drinking. • You doubt that she really has overcome her drinking problem, however, and you would not recommend your own company hire her back. Image Credit: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-1290542/Drinking-alcohol-pregnancy-damages-sperm-quality-sons.html
    • 29. IEEE Code Of Ethics 1. We, the members of the IEEE, in recognition of the importance of our technologies in affecting the quality of life throughout the world, and in accepting a personal obligation to our profession, its members and the communities we serve, do hereby commit ourselves to the highest ethical and professional conduct and agree: To accept responsibility in making decisions consistent with the safety, health, and welfare of the public, and to disclose promptly factors that might endanger the public or the environment; 2. To avoid real or perceived conflicts of interest whenever possible, and to disclose them to affected parties when they do exist; 3. To be honest and realistic in stating claims or estimates based on available data; 4. To reject bribery in all its forms; 5. To improve the understanding of technology; its appropriate application, and potential consequences; 6. To maintain and improve our technical competence and to undertake technological tasks for others only if qualified by training or experience, or after full disclosure of pertinent limitations; 7. To seek, accept, and offer honest criticism of technical work, to acknowledge and correct errors, and to credit properly the contributions of others; 8. To treat fairly all persons regardless of such factors as race, religion, gender, disability, age, or national origin; 9. To avoid injuring others, their property, reputation, or employment by false or malicious action; 10. To assist colleagues and co-workers in their professional development and to support them in following this code of ethics.
    • 30. Ethics & YOU! Ken Lay, CEO of Enron Image Credit: http://www.clevelandleader.com/node/10241
    • 31. Building An Ethical Framework Framework So Far • Recognize an Ethical Issue You need to collect all of the facts • • What individuals and groups have an important stake in the outcome? Are some concerns more important? Why? • Image Credit: http://diwt.wordpress.com/2011/08/08/framework/ What are the relevant facts of the case? What facts are not known? Can I learn more about the situation? Do I know enough to make a decision? What are the options for acting? Have all the relevant persons and groups been consulted? Have I identified creative options?
    • 32. Ethics Case Study: Going Green? • An online auction site could order the shirts from a low-cost company in China or they could order them from a fair-trade company in San Francisco, which provided safe conditions and higher wages for the workers who made the clothing. • The fair trade shirts cost $28.65,making the grand total for the project $8,595. In contrast, the Chinese T-shirts are $5.50 each, and the company's Web site promised fast and free delivery for a grand total of $1,100. • The T-shirts from China would be cheaper so that they could create a more elaborate design with more graphics and color. • Working conditions in China are not good: low wages, rigorous work schedule, poor safety regulations, and the complete lack of worker's compensation and benefits. • The San Francisco T-shirt company could provide shirts that were more expensive, they were fair-trade, organic, and eco-friendly. • What should they do and why? Image Credit: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-1290542/Drinking-alcohol-pregnancy-damages-sperm-quality-sons.html
    • 33. IEEE Code Of Ethics 1. We, the members of the IEEE, in recognition of the importance of our technologies in affecting the quality of life throughout the world, and in accepting a personal obligation to our profession, its members and the communities we serve, do hereby commit ourselves to the highest ethical and professional conduct and agree: To accept responsibility in making decisions consistent with the safety, health, and welfare of the public, and to disclose promptly factors that might endanger the public or the environment; 2. To avoid real or perceived conflicts of interest whenever possible, and to disclose them to affected parties when they do exist; 3. To be honest and realistic in stating claims or estimates based on available data; 4. To reject bribery in all its forms; 5. To improve the understanding of technology; its appropriate application, and potential consequences; 6. To maintain and improve our technical competence and to undertake technological tasks for others only if qualified by training or experience, or after full disclosure of pertinent limitations; 7. To seek, accept, and offer honest criticism of technical work, to acknowledge and correct errors, and to credit properly the contributions of others; 8. To treat fairly all persons regardless of such factors as race, religion, gender, disability, age, or national origin; 9. To avoid injuring others, their property, reputation, or employment by false or malicious action; 10. To assist colleagues and co-workers in their professional development and to support them in following this code of ethics.
    • 34. Ethics & YOU! Ralph Cioffi, former manager of two Bears Stearns hedge funds arrested for mail fraud and conspiracy Image Credit: http://www.clevelandleader.com/node/10241
    • 35. Building An Ethical Framework Framework So Far • Recognize an Ethical Issue • Get the Facts Evaluate Alternative Actions Which option will produce the most good and do the least harm? (The Utilitarian Approach) • Which option best respects the rights of all who have a stake? (The Rights Approach) • Which option treats people equally or proportionately? (The Justice Approach) • Which option best serves the community as a whole, not just some members? (The Common Good Approach) • Image Credit: http://diwt.wordpress.com/2011/08/08/framework/ • Which option leads me to act as the sort of person I want to be? (The Virtue Approach)
    • 36. Ethics Case Study(s) Receiving a Holiday Gift: A supplier sends a basket of expensive foodstuffs to your home at Christmas with a card: "We hope you and your family enjoy the 'goodies.‘". What action(s) might you want to take? Sales Expense: The purchasing manager for a large company agrees to give you an order (their first), expecting you agree to make a $200 donation to his favorite charity, a local youth sports team. How do you respond? Sales Expense Reimbursement: A customer executive from Southeast Asia will visit your HQ facility and meet with your executive team. Your independent Southeast Asian agent requests that you reimburse the customer for his expenses, including expenses that could violate your company's policies. The agent will reimburse you. How do you Image Credit: http://wine-bohemia.info/tag/wine-gift-basket/page/2/ proceed? Image Credit: http://mogosport.wordpress.com/2011/06/06/parenting-and-youth-sports/ Image Credit: http://news.cnet.com/8301-30684_3-10360549-265.html
    • 37. IEEE Code Of Ethics 1. We, the members of the IEEE, in recognition of the importance of our technologies in affecting the quality of life throughout the world, and in accepting a personal obligation to our profession, its members and the communities we serve, do hereby commit ourselves to the highest ethical and professional conduct and agree: To accept responsibility in making decisions consistent with the safety, health, and welfare of the public, and to disclose promptly factors that might endanger the public or the environment; 2. To avoid real or perceived conflicts of interest whenever possible, and to disclose them to affected parties when they do exist; 3. To be honest and realistic in stating claims or estimates based on available data; 4. To reject bribery in all its forms; 5. To improve the understanding of technology; its appropriate application, and potential consequences; 6. To maintain and improve our technical competence and to undertake technological tasks for others only if qualified by training or experience, or after full disclosure of pertinent limitations; 7. To seek, accept, and offer honest criticism of technical work, to acknowledge and correct errors, and to credit properly the contributions of others; 8. To treat fairly all persons regardless of such factors as race, religion, gender, disability, age, or national origin; 9. To avoid injuring others, their property, reputation, or employment by false or malicious action; 10. To assist colleagues and co-workers in their professional development and to support them in following this code of ethics.
    • 38. Ethics & YOU! Former Bear Stearns hedge fund manager, Matthew Tanin, being arrested for fraud. Image Credit: http://www.clevelandleader.com/node/10241
    • 39. Building An Ethical Framework Framework So Far • Recognize an Ethical Issue • Get the Facts • Evaluate Alternative Actions Make a Decision and Test It • Considering all these approaches, which option best addresses the situation? • If I told someone I respector told a television audience-which option I have chosen, what would they say? Image Credit: http://diwt.wordpress.com/2011/08/08/framework/
    • 40. Ethics: Case Study(s) References: Conflict of Interest: A large, prospective client calls you and asks about a competitor's reputation. One of your long time customers had a very bad experience with this competitor. What information do you share with the prospect? How do you respond to the prospect’s call? As department manager, you are hosting an informal celebration in the office. The food budget is $200. Your next door neighbor has just started her own catering business and asks to supply the food. Since she is just starting out, she'll do it at cost and provide extra items at no charge. What might you want to consider? Gratuities: Competition: A customer has a large sailing yacht on a vessel that your company will be unloading. The customer is present and is watching the off-loading operation. You are in a head-to-head battle with your arch competitor, Evil Enterprises. One of your co-workers approaches you. He has recently joined your company after having worked for a second competitor for several years. The five stevedores and you manage pull off a very tricky maneuver, safely transferring the yacht to the trailer. The customer is elated, and reaches into his pocket, pulling out a big wad of $50 bills. What do you do? He suggests, "I made notes on all of Evil's bids when I could get the data. They use some clear cost standards. Would you like me to bring my notes to Image Credit: http://images.google.com/url?source=imglanding&ct=ref&q=http://truittdesign.personablesolutions.com/References.aspx the office tomorrow and let you look through them?" Image Credit: http://images.google.com/url?source=imglanding&ct=ref&q=http://cruisefever.net/if-i-prepay-the-tips-on-my-cruise-do-i-need-to-tip-anyone-else Image Credit: http://www.highlighthealth.com/health-news/medical-journal-conflict-of-interest-disclosure-and-other-issues/ How do you respond? Image Credit: http://fitsit360.com/tag/competition/
    • 41. IEEE Code Of Ethics 1. We, the members of the IEEE, in recognition of the importance of our technologies in affecting the quality of life throughout the world, and in accepting a personal obligation to our profession, its members and the communities we serve, do hereby commit ourselves to the highest ethical and professional conduct and agree: To accept responsibility in making decisions consistent with the safety, health, and welfare of the public, and to disclose promptly factors that might endanger the public or the environment; 2. To avoid real or perceived conflicts of interest whenever possible, and to disclose them to affected parties when they do exist; 3. To be honest and realistic in stating claims or estimates based on available data; 4. To reject bribery in all its forms; 5. To improve the understanding of technology; its appropriate application, and potential consequences; 6. To maintain and improve our technical competence and to undertake technological tasks for others only if qualified by training or experience, or after full disclosure of pertinent limitations; 7. To seek, accept, and offer honest criticism of technical work, to acknowledge and correct errors, and to credit properly the contributions of others; 8. To treat fairly all persons regardless of such factors as race, religion, gender, disability, age, or national origin; 9. To avoid injuring others, their property, reputation, or employment by false or malicious action; 10. To assist colleagues and co-workers in their professional development and to support them in following this code of ethics.
    • 42. Ethics & YOU! Danielle Chiesi, the former beauty queen turned stock trader got 30 months in prison. Ceisei passed on insider stock information to her married boss and lover, Mark Kurland Image Credit: http://www.clevelandleader.com/node/10241
    • 43. Should We Ship? The company records-retention policy instructs employees to discard development records and test results for products five years after End of Life is declared. This policy is in compliance with local legal requirements. Because of how much work you have, you’ve not disposed of some old records, and they are a couple of years over the limit for the company policy. You finally get time to clean out your files, but then you receive a legal request for any information about the old product that is involved in an injury case. Your records may or may not be applicable to the case. Should you destroy the records? You have just discovered that a country in the Far East has new regulations that apply to your product. The requirement is to submit a report and get a file number to apply to your product - after the government department has given its OK. However, you know from industry contacts that there is no enforcement of the law at this time. Should you delay shipping products until they are compliant or take other action? Image Credit: http://www.servitokss.com/question-marks/
    • 44. IEEE Code Of Ethics 1. We, the members of the IEEE, in recognition of the importance of our technologies in affecting the quality of life throughout the world, and in accepting a personal obligation to our profession, its members and the communities we serve, do hereby commit ourselves to the highest ethical and professional conduct and agree: To accept responsibility in making decisions consistent with the safety, health, and welfare of the public, and to disclose promptly factors that might endanger the public or the environment; 2. To avoid real or perceived conflicts of interest whenever possible, and to disclose them to affected parties when they do exist; 3. To be honest and realistic in stating claims or estimates based on available data; 4. To reject bribery in all its forms; 5. To improve the understanding of technology; its appropriate application, and potential consequences; 6. To maintain and improve our technical competence and to undertake technological tasks for others only if qualified by training or experience, or after full disclosure of pertinent limitations; 7. To seek, accept, and offer honest criticism of technical work, to acknowledge and correct errors, and to credit properly the contributions of others; 8. To treat fairly all persons regardless of such factors as race, religion, gender, disability, age, or national origin; 9. To avoid injuring others, their property, reputation, or employment by false or malicious action; 10. To assist colleagues and co-workers in their professional development and to support them in following this code of ethics.
    • 45. Ethics & YOU! Ernst Lieb, the former president and chief executive of Mercedes-Benz USA was fired after repeatedly flouting rules governing the use of company funds and influence. He paid golf-club fees through Daimler and granted rentals of vehicles in exchange for flight upgrades. He was reported to have used corporate funds to build his house in the New York region. Image Credit: http://www.thedetroitbureau.com/2009/04/qa-mercedes-benz-us-ceo-ernst-lieb/
    • 46. Ethics Case Studies Case #1: Your company's product uses some supplementary circuit protection in larger units. While visiting the factory for another reason, you tour the production line and notice that the protectors are different from the ones you originally evaluated. They seem to have the same ratings, but you suspect they may not be suitable as a substitute. This product is not your responsibility, and you would have to do some research to figure out if there is a problem. Image Credit: http://www.ecvv.com/product/92043.html
    • 47. Ethics Case Studies Case #2: The latest edition of the standard that applies to your products now has three pages of "safety" markings and warnings specified. So many warnings about very unlikely situations greatly reduce the impact of warnings that might prevent dangerous events. You have actually surveyed customers and found that to be true. Should you reduce the warning labels to only to the important ones or just follow the standards of the certification agencies? Your marketing department wants you to colorcoordinate and reduce in size the warning labels. The new version still would comply with the standard, but it would not stand out on the machine. Should you resist the change? Image Credit: http://h18000.www1.hp.com/products/quickspecs/12506_div/12506_div.HTML
    • 48. IEEE Code Of Ethics 1. We, the members of the IEEE, in recognition of the importance of our technologies in affecting the quality of life throughout the world, and in accepting a personal obligation to our profession, its members and the communities we serve, do hereby commit ourselves to the highest ethical and professional conduct and agree: To accept responsibility in making decisions consistent with the safety, health, and welfare of the public, and to disclose promptly factors that might endanger the public or the environment; 2. To avoid real or perceived conflicts of interest whenever possible, and to disclose them to affected parties when they do exist; 3. To be honest and realistic in stating claims or estimates based on available data; 4. To reject bribery in all its forms; 5. To improve the understanding of technology; its appropriate application, and potential consequences; 6. To maintain and improve our technical competence and to undertake technological tasks for others only if qualified by training or experience, or after full disclosure of pertinent limitations; 7. To seek, accept, and offer honest criticism of technical work, to acknowledge and correct errors, and to credit properly the contributions of others; 8. To treat fairly all persons regardless of such factors as race, religion, gender, disability, age, or national origin; 9. To avoid injuring others, their property, reputation, or employment by false or malicious action; 10. To assist colleagues and co-workers in their professional development and to support them in following this code of ethics.
    • 49. Building An Ethical Framework Framework So Far • Recognize an Ethical Issue • Get the Facts • Evaluate Alternative Actions • Make a Decision and Test It Act and Reflect on the Outcome • How can my decision be implemented with the greatest care and attention to the concerns of all stakeholders? • How did my decision turn out and what have I learned from this specific situation? Image Credit: http://diwt.wordpress.com/2011/08/08/framework/
    • 50. Should We Ship? A new high-end computer is ready to ship - except for one test that you will not complete for another three weeks. The probability of failure is low - and even if the test fails, corrections can be made and sent out later to customers. Marketing is VERY anxious to ship because the end of the fiscal quarter is next week. Should you put on the agency mark and ship while finishing the test? Your boss tells you that this has occurred before; the company shipped the product, and there was no problem. He also says that if you do not want to sign off, then he will do so. What should you do? Products were shipped before this test was completed - but it happened when you were on a business trip. The production manager apologizes, but doesn't want to take any action. What should you do? Image Credit: http://www.servitokss.com/question-marks/
    • 51. IEEE Code Of Ethics 1. We, the members of the IEEE, in recognition of the importance of our technologies in affecting the quality of life throughout the world, and in accepting a personal obligation to our profession, its members and the communities we serve, do hereby commit ourselves to the highest ethical and professional conduct and agree: To accept responsibility in making decisions consistent with the safety, health, and welfare of the public, and to disclose promptly factors that might endanger the public or the environment; 2. To avoid real or perceived conflicts of interest whenever possible, and to disclose them to affected parties when they do exist; 3. To be honest and realistic in stating claims or estimates based on available data; 4. To reject bribery in all its forms; 5. To improve the understanding of technology; its appropriate application, and potential consequences; 6. To maintain and improve our technical competence and to undertake technological tasks for others only if qualified by training or experience, or after full disclosure of pertinent limitations; 7. To seek, accept, and offer honest criticism of technical work, to acknowledge and correct errors, and to credit properly the contributions of others; 8. To treat fairly all persons regardless of such factors as race, religion, gender, disability, age, or national origin; 9. To avoid injuring others, their property, reputation, or employment by false or malicious action; 10. To assist colleagues and co-workers in their professional development and to support them in following this code of ethics.
    • 52. Building An Ethical Framework Framework 1. Recognize an Ethical Issue 2. Get the Facts 3. Evaluate Alternative Actions 4. Make a Decision and Test It 5. Act and Reflect on the Outcome Image Credit: http://diwt.wordpress.com/2011/08/08/framework/
    • 53. Final Thought: You Don’t Look Good In Handcuffs!

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