Use of new media technologies to improve adolescent health

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HCMC Department of Pediatrics Grand Rounds, April 18, 2013

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  • Many organizations use videos. The First Lady’s Let’s Move campaign uses videos to solve the problem of childhood obesity within a generation and to raise healthier children. Beyonce made a dance video for Let’s Move and it is an example of how one health improvement video, highly produced, has been viewed by over 26,000,000. More importantly, it spawned hundreds, perhaps thousands of “flash mob” dancers, like these. These are powerful images.
  • Good morning. I’m Julia Joseph-Di Caprio, aka Dr. Julia, aka DrJ4TeenHealth.com. This last name, my online name, really annoys my children so I like to add it. Also, it gives them something they can tease me about. Today I’m going to speak about the use of new media technologies to improve adolescent health. I practice adolescent medicine, or you might see me in the after-hours clinic or the nursery practicing general pediatrics. I’m also the Chief of Pediatrics here. Before, I begin, 2 disclaimers—first, I am a novice in the use of social media which is okay because so are most health care providers. Second, I am not tech savvy, so if you have a question about how to do something other then the basics on Twitter or how to access some certain topic on Reddit, I’ll have to call my daughter or son for help. But, I don’t want to be this guy. I found this article in the Wall Street Journal yesterday, “Don’t Be the Office Tech Dinosaur, which chronicles how a 50 year old man in advertising has been working to stay current technologically. I feel a lot of empathy for this man, this was and remains me. I don’t find many computer or technology tools easy or intuitive. However, I have had a couple of experiences that led me try to become more familiar with new media technologies because I realized the potential of these tools to help youth,
  • I had a number of experiences that led me to realize the potential power of new media technologies. First, I noticed over the past year or two several of my patients using apps to track their menses, when they had sex, and to help them remember to take their birth control like this one, iPeriod. This can be downloaded for free and tracks all aspects of menstrual cycles. This is for Apple devices, but there are others for other types of computers and mobile devices.
  • Here’s a similar app for Android devices, My Days. This app is quite easy to use.
  • So anyway, I noticed increased use of media technologies by my patients and then I had a bit of an epiphany while at a Wild game in December 2011. My daughter was home from school, sitting behind me, and she leaned over and said, “Harry tweeted me - Lil Wayne and Drake are at the Mall of America.” A little while later she leaned over and said, “Harry just tweeted me again-the Mall of America is on lock down.” What I was impressed with wasn’t that the story of Lil Wayne and Drake being at the Mall of America wasn’t true, although I was intrigued by the possibility that someone send out incorrect information to bring a mob of teens to the MOA to loot and cause trouble, the police have subsequently discounted this as being a planned event. What I was intrigued by the fast transit of information. Harry wasn’t even at the MOA, but he had received this information and passed it on to others, who told their friends, who then told their friends, and so on, and so on… By the way, this story on the Gawker website got over 187,000 likes.This week some of you may have seen that image of the man injured the Boston Marathon bombings. He appeared to have lost both legs and someone was helping him as he was being pushed in a wheelchair. Gawker had an article on this person. He is apparently an ex-NFL football player, Arredondo, who was at the Marathon to support a friend running in honor of Arredondo’s son who died in Iraq.New media technologies are such powerful tools for information dissemination and youth health serving providers are recognizing this. They are trying to, and at times are able to harness this power to improve adolescent health. I became intrigued with new media technologies and decided to see what I could learn about this phenomenon and how it could be used in my Adolescent Medicine practice.
  • The objectives for my presentation are as followsDefine new media technologies and their use by adolescentsDescribe how healthcare organizations are using new media technologies to better serve adolescents (as I do this I will speak about some work with new techologies I am involved with)Consider incorporating new media technologies into your work with youthThroughout this presentation, I will reference examples of various new media that you may want to use with adolescents or just learn more about the organizations behind them.
  • The objectives for my presentation are as followsDefine new media technologies and their use by adolescentsDescribe how healthcare organizations are using new media technologies to better serve adolescentsConsider incorporating new media technologies into your work with youth
  • New media, versus “old media” like newspapers or, for health care-flyers we hand patients, can be described as being:On-demandDigital, versus analog. It’s electronic media that works on digital codesInteractive, participatoryDemocraticUnregulated contentMobile
  • What is meant by democratic, participatory, unregulated? Well here’s a video from It Gets Better a site that helps LGBTQ youth by letting others who have gone through what they went through post video messages. This video has had almost 1.9 million views.
  • Examples of new media technologies include:InternetWebsitesComputer multimediaVideo gamesAppsCD-ROMS, DVDs
  • And organizations are using all of these as they address adolescent health issues such as STDs,
  • obesity,
  • Media use by adolescent continues to increase. Total media use by 8-18 year olds increased by more than 2 hours from 2005-2009 to 8 ½ hours per day. Even “old” media use is by adolescents is via new media, for example watching movies on the computer, reading books on a Kindle. Also, if you are wondering how teens can have so much media use—it is possible because they multitask. They may be texting while watching a movie on their computer; or, they might listen to music on their mobile phone while playing a video game. Increasingly important when thinking about what social media strategy to implement for the youth you serve, is that 74% of adolescent media use is mobile. This is for several reasons, first more than ¾’s of teens have cell phones and mobile internet use allows them a significant amount of privacy. There does not appear to be a digital disparity—minority youth, Latino and African-American, have high rates of cell phone.
  • Internet use for adolescents is high. Here is recent data from the Pew Internet and American Life Project that tracks new media technology use, particularly that of adolescents. The Pew Center did a nationally representative study last year of over 800 12-17 year olds. They found that internet use is high for all groups, and is highest among 12-17 year olds.
  • There is a little bit of a digital divide-but black and Latino youth have high computer ownership. 71% of the time youth will say that the computer they use most is shared with family members. This and the need to communicate with friends is why mobile internet use is coveted by teens.
  • When looking at access to the internet there isn’t much of a disparity by ethnicity or SES. All ethnicities have high internet access. Further, many youth use mobile devices. In fact, ¾’s of teens say that they access the internet on cell phones, tablets, and other mobile devices. You can see that black youth were more likely then other youth to say they access the internet mostly on a cell phone.
  • This shows the high cell phone ownership for all teens.
  • Here is a breakdown of cell phone and smartphone ownership by youth. You can see that 37% of 12-17 year olds have smart phones and 50% of youth with a smartphone access the internet primarily via their mobile device.
  • Social media is digital technology that allows interaction and this is very appealing to teens. Adolescents are good at managing their social accessibility. For example, they use cell phones for texting more than talking. Only 14% of adolescents in 2011 said they talk on their cell phone daily, which was down from 30% in 2009, whereas 75%, up from 60%, report texting daily. Teens will make an average of 5 calls on their cell phone per day, whereas they send and receive an average of more than 60, up from 50 in 2009, text messages per day. Minority teens text the most. In terms of other social networks, 2/3’s of youth use online social networks and lower income teens are more likely to use these social networks. Facebook is the social network used by youth. It will be interesting to see what happens now that many adults are on Facebook, will teens migrate away from it, perhaps choosing to use other tools like the microblogging sites Twitter and Tumblr more, or photo sharing apps like Instagram or Snapchat. Teens are also pretty accomplished at decreasing their Facebook use if they have a lot of studying to do, or if they believe there is too much “drama” on Facebook. But like always, parents can monitor their teens usage, until they get too old to do that. But key is what has always been key-know your child’s friends, do things with your teen, and model the type of behavior you want to see in them.
  • Twitter is a microblogging site. Users can send and read text-based posts of up to 140 characters or tweets. With Twitter users can have followers of one’s tweets, follow other’s tweets, or read what is being tweeted about various subjects. Twitter also allows messages to be sent directly to other’s on Twitter and users can also contribute to what is being tweeted on any topic. (Super Bowl0> Twitter’s use by teens doubled from 2009 to 2011. It’s use by teens is much less than other social networks, but usage is growing. The Pew Center may have included questions about Twitter in its 2012 survey.
  • Tumblr is a microblogging and social network site. It was founded in 2007 and has 13 billion views per month, 76.5 million posts per day, with 102.6 million blogs. Tumblr is most popular with teens and those college-aged, and half of Tumblr visitor base is under 25.
  • This graphic illustrates the variety and complexity of social networks.
  • This is a fun way to understand social media.
  • An online presence for a youth-serving health organization is important not just because many almost every young person and their parents have high internet use, but also because a majority of teens report using the internet to search for health, dieting or fitness information. For example, the Pew Internet and American Life Project found that almost 1 in 3 online teens search for health, dieting, or physical fitness information; 17% search for sensitive health information online.
  • Here is more recent data. The Internet Sexuality Information Services, as it was previously known, it is now youth+tech+health, conducted focus groups with 13-24 year olds, including youth of color, in Oakland, California and Chicago, Illinois in 2011, in order to figure out how urban youth with color use technology, especially as it might relate to getting information about sexual health. This study revealed that an online search was the first option when a young person had a question about sexual health-including birth control and sexually transmitted diseases. Interestingly, this study found that health professionals were still trusted sources of information, but the youth did express discomfort going to a doctor they or their family knew. They also viewed doctors as some who could help them solve their health problems, but the youth saw themselves as significant resources, especially since they could go online and get health information from around the world. The results from this study and the recent Pew study on mobile technologies, highlights how quickly technology and new media change occurs. When the ISIS study was done, very few of the participants reported using mobile technologies. This is much different from what is going on now. But the ISIS participants did say that receiving a birth control or appointment reminder via a text message would be acceptable to them.
  • The objectives for my presentation are as followsDefine new media technologies and their use by adolescentsDescribe how healthcare organizations are using new media technologies to better serve adolescentsConsider incorporating new media technologies into your work with youth
  • Because of this wide use of new media by youth, Hyden and Cohall advise that “Youth-serving programs need to stay familiar with these changes and consider what roles new tools can play in conjunction with their traditional approaches while learning lessons and applying them toward upcoming generations of new technology.” Additionally, it has been suggested that new digital technologies could have a pivotal role in addressing health disparities for a number of reasons, including that minority populations are receptive to social media.So, new media technologies can help deliver health interventions to large communities of adolescents. The tools that can be used include web sites, social networking sites, text messaging, and video sharing. However, the strategies that work tend to be combined strategies that reach teens a number of different ways. It is also important to ensure mobile access because of the ubiquity of cell phone use by teens.
  • First and most importantly, youth must drive the use of the technology and the messages that are sent, because of how quickly technology changes and young people adopt and then discard new media technologies, So, it’s very important if health care providers want to use these technologies that they continuously survey youth about their use and involve the youth in developing health related programs that use new technologies.I have a small project with a North Minneapolis organization, Youth Determined to Succeed, to implement a social media program for them. YDS was founded by Melvin Anderson, an ex pro football player, to address the obesity epidemic among urban youth. It has several components now-Kids 4 Health (nutrition, exercise, lifestyle program for obese and overweight youth and their families), Brooklyn Center Institute (a similar program at Brooklyn Center HS Recreational Center), a leadership program, Youth Leaders of Change, and Track MN (an elite track program). Working with a social media strategy development and implementation company, SocialNicole, this project is asking YDS participants about what YDS messages and via what type of social media to be most effective.
  • Preliminary resultsSocialNicole has developed a preliminary strategy based on this focus group and we will then refine it by meeting again with the youth and then implement it.
  • Sex, etc. from Rutgers University is a good example of a website that is highly appealing to adolescents. It has current information and allows participation. It also is mostly written by teens. Bedsider.org is another example of an appealing site for 18-29 year olds from the National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy.
  • Sex, etc. uses a combined strategy. In addition to it’s website, it is on Twitter, Facebook and still publishes a paper newsletter.Everyone is gay are two young women who educate to promote tolerance for LGBTQ youth.
  • You can use videos in your work with youth, because having an interesting video is more important than high tech production video. On my site, I have uploaded videos I “produced” using my cell phone. This is one that many teens and parents have commented on and laughed about. I decided to begin a site for information from me to adolescents and their parents. I started it in January, write something daily, and hope to add more functionality. Even with my simple media strategy I have had over 1700 hits to my site. I also Tweet everyday. I am still learning what I should write about. I believe that links for adolescents is important. I also find that the adolescent voice is important so will change the site to allow more interaction, more participation.Here’s a video from the site It Get’s Better project. Anyone can upload a video to support LGBTQ youth as the deal with stigma.
  • Circle of 6 is an award-winning app that prevents violence by allowing you to easily contact friends or officials that you have preprogrammed into your phone. The app uses your location to let your contacts know where you are so that they can get help to you.
  • Text messaging is another social media tool and one simple use of text messaging that has been proven effective has been its use to improve on time completion of multidose vaccines. For adolescents, the completion rates for the HPV vaccine are poor. The goal in Healthy People 2020 is 80% completion, but only 32% of 13-to-17-year-old females in the U.S. in 2010 had received all three doses of the HPV vaccine, according to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) National Immunization Survey-Teen, which estimates vaccine coverage for this age group annually. There are significant ethnic disparities: black and Hispanic youth within this sample were less likely than white youth to have completed the series. Socioeconomic status is correlated with vaccine completion: Thirteen-to-17-year-old youth in 2010 living below the poverty level were less likely to have completed the HPV series.4 Overall, Minnesota vaccine completion rates for adolescents mirror those for the entire U.S.4 In 2010, only 51.3% of 13-to-17-year-old adolescents in Minnesota had received one or more doses of the HPV vaccine, and only 37.8% had completed the series.Niccolai LM, Mehta NR, Hadler JL. Racial/ethnic and poverty disparities in human papillomavirus vaccination completion. Am J Prev Med 2011;41(4):428-433 
  • The intervention group, the youth who enrolled in the text message reminder program, were statistically more likely to receive the next HPV vaccine on time compared to those who did not enroll, the opt-out controls, and the historical controls(over 51% versus 35% and 38%). This difference was sustained 4 months after the HPV vaccine dose was due and the difference remained after controlling for insurance and site of care. Text message reminders to promote human papillomavirus vaccinationElyse OlshenKharbanda, Melissa S. Stockwell, Harrison W. Fox, Raquel Andres, Marcos Lara, and Vaughn I. RickertVaccine, 2011-03-21, Volume 29, Issue 14, Pages 2537-2541
  • Text messaging has also been used by Teensource in California. Teensource works to improve the health and well-being of young people in California by providing sexual and reproductive health information and resources. They implemented a text messaging program, “hookup,” that sends out sexual health texts each week and also helps youth access sexual health services. The interesting part about Teensource and “hookup” is that an evaluation was done to determine whether this new media communication-based work has changed health behavior. It has been determined that youth will access health resources that use new media strategies, now for the next question--does the use of new media tools impact adolescent health outcomes?
  • Hookup evaluation is unique because it used text messaging to pose questions about its service. Here is initial data from hookup presented at Sex:Tech 2012, an annual conference to review the use of new technologies to improve adolescent sexual health. The youth noted that use of “hookup” text messaging service made them knowledgeable and aware of healthy sexual practices, increased their safe sex practices, helped them get contraception information, and helped them access HIV/STD testing.
  • Qualitatively, here are some of the comments texted to hookup: i have thought more carefully and decided to use a condom on my first time having sex rather than risking pregnancystopped having multiple partners. More aware of the truth on how stds are actually easily attained.i got addresses to clinics near me where i was able to pick up Plan B emergency contraceptive yesterdaystd test appointment next week.
  • So as you consider using new media strategies in your work with youth, I suggest that you devise targeted strategies, know who you are appealing to and what would work with them. It is important to learn from young people what would work with them. I often ask young people I work with what they want to know more about, and have written a grant to develop a social media strategy for a youth-serving organization in Minneapolis where the strategy will be devised, implemented and then perpetuated by the young people being served by the organization.Other keys to successful new media strategies include ensuring that they allow one to connect with another. Therefore, the strategies need to be interactive and encourage participation. This leads to concerns about privacy, particularly use of adolescent information for commercial or criminal justice purposes. The ACLU has a project to increase awareness about privacy issues and technology, dotRights. They have tools to help developers embed strong privacy controls in new media strategies. Their public campaign is found at http://www.dotrights.org/.As I mentioned earlier, successful strategies use a varied approach. A developer I am using made it clear to me that even with newer tools like Twitter, a robust website for one’s organization is key—it is the home that users will access.Finally, with increasing number of youth using mobile devices a strategy needs to be optimized for mobile use. For example, allow youth and their families to access your organization’s new media without being impeded by complicated graphics and data that takes a long time to download.
  • Here an examples of a successful new media strategy. It’s your sex life, an MTV Kaiser Family Foundation collaboration to address youth sexual health issues, such as STD’s and teen pregnancy, uses a combination of new and old media tools. Their Get Yourself Tested campaign website is an example of how to make dissemination of health information appealing and interactive. What a combination! An established foundation that produces information, research, and analysis on health issues working with world-wide youth entertainment company with a reach of more than half-billion households.
  • The objectives for my presentation are as followsDefine new media technologies and their use by adolescentsDescribe how healthcare organizations are using new media technologies to better serve adolescentsConsider incorporating new media technologies into your work with youth
  • Views by country since February 25, 2012.
  • In summary, new media use is ubiquitous, particularly by adolescents. Adolescents use new media to access health information.Youth-serving organizations, particularly those working to get and keep teens healthy, are successfully using new media strategies. Finally, I hope you can see, as I am learning through my work as drj4teenhealth, that you can successfully include a new media strategy in your work with adolescents.
  • Use of new media technologies to improve adolescent health

    1. 1. 1
    2. 2. 2
    3. 3. Use of new media technologies toimprove adolescent health Julia Joseph-Di Caprio, M.D., M.P.H. Chief, HCMC Department of Pediatrics 3
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    7. 7. Objectives1. Define new media technologies and their use by adolescents2. Describe how healthcare organizations are using new media technologies to better serve adolescents3. Consider incorporating new media technologies into your work with youth 7
    8. 8. Objectives1. Define new media technologies and their use by adolescents2. Describe how healthcare organizations are using new media technologies to better serve adolescents3. Consider incorporating new media technologies into your work with youth 8
    9. 9. New media technologies1. On-demand2. Digital3. Interactive, participatory4. Democratic5. Unregulated content6. Mobile 9
    10. 10. 10
    11. 11. New media technologies1. Internet2. Websites3. Computer multimedia4. Video games5. Apps6. CD-ROMS, DVDs 11
    12. 12. 12
    13. 13. 13
    14. 14. New media use1. Media use by adolescents continues to increase2. Even “old” media use is via new media3. Teens multitask4. Much of adolescent media use is mobile5. More than ¾’s of teens have cell phones6. Minority youth have high rates of cell phone ownership7. Over one third of black teens use their phones to go online 14
    15. 15. Tablets are also taking hold, as close to one in four teens say they have one of these devices. Taken together,teens have more ways than ever to stay connected throughout the day — and night.Internet use over time by teens and adults% within each age group who go onlineSource: The Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project surveys. All teen data comes from separate surveysof teens and their parents. Methodological info for each survey is available at: http://pewinternet.org/Data-Tools/Download-Data pewinternet.org 3 15
    16. 16. Teen Computer and Tablet Ownership Demographics % of teens in each demographic group Own a Computer Own a Tablet All teens, ages 12-17 (n=802) 80% 23% Teen Gender a Boys(n=405) 77 20 a b Girls (n=397) 82 27 Age of Teen a 12-13 (n=246) 72 26 a b 14-17 (n=556) 83 22 Teen Gender and Age a Boys, 12-13 (n=122) 66 23 a b Boys, 14-17 (n=283) 82 18 c Girls, 12-13 (n=124) 79 28 a d Girls, 14-17 (n=273) 84 27 Parent Race/ethnicity b a White, Non-Hispanic (n=542) 81 25 b Black, Non-Hispanic (n=122) 64 19 c Hispanic (n=92) 79 21 Parent Education a Less than High School/High school grad (n=244) 77 16 a b Some College (n=192) 78 30 a c College + (n=363) 85 29 Parent Household Income a Less than $30,000/yr (n=154) 73 15 b $30,000-$49,999 (n=155) 82 19 c $50,000-$74,999 (n=110) 84 27 ab d $75,000+ (n=335) 81 31 Urbanity a Urban (n=278) 75 25 a b Suburban (n=410) 84 23 c Rural (n=101) 72 23Source: Pew Internet Teens and Privacy Management Survey, July 26-September 30, 2012. N=802 parents of teensages 12-17 and 802 teens ages 12-17. Margin of error is +/- 4.5 percentage points. aNote: Columns marked with a superscript letter ( ) or another letter indicate a statistically significant differencebetween that row and the row designated by that superscript letter. Statistical significance is determined inside the 16specific section covering each demographic trait.
    17. 17. 17
    18. 18. For instance, teens living in the lowest-earning households (under $30,000 per year) are just as likely as thoseliving in the highest-earning households ($75,000 or more) to own smartphones (39% vs. 43%). Older teens aremore likely than younger teens to have cell phones and those phones are more likely to be smartphones. Ruralteens are significantly less likely to have a smartphone than urban or suburban teens. Source: Pew Internet Teens and Privacy Management Survey, July 26-September 30, 2012. N=802 parents of teens ages 12-17 and 802 teens ages 12-17. Margin of error is +/- 4.5 percentage points.One in four teens are “cell-mostly” internet users — far more than the 15% ofadults who are cell-mostly. Among teen smartphone owners, half are cell-mostly. 18
    19. 19. Teen Cell Phone and Smartphone Ownership Demographics % of teens in each demographic group Own a Cell Phone (any kind) Own a Smartphone All teens, ages 12-17 (n=802) 78% 37% Teen Gender a Boys(n=405) 77 36 b Girls (n=397) 78 38 Age of Teen a 12-13 (n=246) 68 23 a a b 14-17 (n=556) 83 44 Teen Gender and Age a Boys, 12-13 (n=122) 65 20 ac ac b Boys, 14-17 (n=283) 83 43 c Girls, 12-13 (n=124) 71 26 a ac d Girls, 14-17 (n=273) 82 44 Parent Race/ethnicity c a White, Non-Hispanic (n=542) 81 35 b Black, Non-Hispanic (n=122) 72 40 c Hispanic (n=92) 64 43 Parent Education a Less Than High School/High school grad (n=244) 71 35 b Some College (n=192) 79 35 ab c College + (n=363) 87 41 Parent Household Income b a Less than $30,000/yr (n=154) 69 39 b $30,000-$49,999 (n=155) 74 24 c $50,000-$74,999 (n=110) 81 38 ab b d $75,000+ (n=335) 86 43 Urbanity c a Urban (n=278) 76 42 c b Suburban (n=410) 81 39 c Rural (n=101) 73 19Source: Pew Internet Teens and Privacy Management Survey, July 26-September 30, 2012. N=802 parents of teensages 12-17 and 802 teens ages 12-17. Margin of error is +/- 4.5 percentage points. aNote: Columns marked with a superscript letter ( ) or another letter indicate a statistically significant differencebetween that row and the row designated by that superscript letter. Statistical significance is determined inside the 19specific section covering each demographic trait.
    20. 20. Social media1. Digital technology that allows interaction2. Adolescents use cell phones for texting more than talking3. Minority teens more likely to text4. Two-thirds of youth use social networks5. Lower income youth most likely to use online social networks6. Facebook is the preferred social network 20
    21. 21. 21
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    25. 25. d!similar!variations!"!older!teens,!particularly!older!teen!girls!were!more!ation!online.! ook!for!information! o!talk!about,!like! ession.!A!bit!more!using!teens!look!ensitive!health! o!the!22%!who!4.!! to!look!online!for! 3%!vs.!11%).!! y!group!to!look!for! hat!is!hard!to!talk!ages!12"13!have! f!older!boys!ages!14"ome!families!–!those!ually!–!are!the!most! n!online.!Just!about!a!quarter!(23%)!of!online!low"income!teens!look!for!with!11%!of!teens!from!households!earning!more!than!$75,000!a!year.!!! 25he!differences!visible!between!groups!when!we!first!asked!about!looking!
    26. 26. 26
    27. 27. Objectives1. Define new media technologies and their use by adolescents2. Describe how healthcare organizations are using new media technologies to better serve adolescents3. Consider incorporating new media technologies into your work with youth 27
    28. 28. New media and health1. Can deliver health interventions to large communities of adolescents2. Web sites3. Social networking sites4. Text messaging5. Video sharing6. Apps7. Combined strategies8. Need to ensure mobile access 28
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    30. 30. YDS focus groups• 6 males, 8 females• 13-18 years• Grades: 8th to college• Social media they use: Instagram, Twitter, Snap Chat, Tumblr, Facebook, You Tube, Pinterest, Gmail, Facetime, Skype, text messages• To get YDS message out: Facebook and Twitter• Twitter: must be inspiring tweets, don’t retweet, don’t recycle tweets, no more then 3-12 tweets per day• Use Instagram for before and after pictures• Use You Tube for training videos, PSAs 30
    31. 31. Website• http://www.sexetc.org/• http://bedsider.org/methods 31
    32. 32. Social networking site• https://www.facebook.com/everyoneisgaydotcom ?fref=ts 32
    33. 33. Video sharing• http://drj4teenhealth.com/2012/03/11/go-to-bed/ 33
    34. 34. Apps 34
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    36. 36. 36
    37. 37. Text messaging• HPV vaccine completion rates are poor• There are ethnic and SES disparities• Text message reminder program in a variety of 9 clinical sites in NYC for females 9-20 years old 37
    38. 38. Text message reminders to promote human papillomavirus vaccinationElyse Olshen Kharbanda, Melissa S. Stockwell, Harrison W. Fox, Raquel Andres, Marcos Lara, and Vaughn I. RickertVaccine, 2011-03-21, Volume 29, Issue 14, Pages 2537-2541 38
    39. 39. Text messaginghttp://www.teensource.org/ts/ 39
    40. 40. hookup evaluation Awareness/Knowledge Change Change 17% 38% 17% Safe Sex Knowledge & Awareness Birth Control HIV/STD testing 28%(c) ISIS, Inc. 2012
    41. 41. hookup evaluation• i have thought more carefully and decided to use a condom on my first time having sex rather than risking pregnancy• stopped having multiple partners. More aware of the truth on how stds are actually easily attained.• i got addresses to clinics near me where i was able to pick up Plan B emergency contraceptive yesterday• std test appointment next week. (c) ISIS, Inc. 2012
    42. 42. Successful new media strategies1. Targeted2. Encourages connection3. Interactive/participatory4. Combines a variety of media strategies5. Optimized for mobile use 42
    43. 43. Successful new media strategieshttp://www.itsyoursexlife.com/gyt/talk/party/ 43
    44. 44. Objectives1. Define new media technologies and their use by adolescents2. Describe how healthcare organizations are using new media technologies to better serve adolescents3. Consider incorporating new media technologies into your work with youth 44
    45. 45. drj4teenhealth.com @DrJ4TeenHealth• Started January 2012• 433 posts• 5,709 views• Nutrition and sexual health topics are the most popular• Comments are scary, not many followers, it takes time! 45
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    47. 47. Summary1. New media use is ubiquitous2. Adolescents use new media to access health information3. Youth-serving organizations are successfully using new media strategies4. www.drj4teenhealth.com 47

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