Presentation part 4

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  • The objectives for my presentation are as followsDefine new media technologies and their use by adolescentsDescribe how healthcare organizations are using new media technologies to better serve adolescents (as I do this I will speak about some work with new techologies I am involved with)Review use of new media technologies to improve immunization ratesConsider incorporating new media technologies into your work with youthThroughout this presentation, I will reference examples of various new media that you may want to use with adolescents or just learn more about the organizations behind them.
  • Let’s return to text messaging. One simple use of text messaging that has been proven effective has been its use to improve on time completion of multi-dose vaccines. For adolescents, the completion rates for the HPV vaccine are poor. The goal in Healthy People 2020 is 80% completion, but only 32% of 13-to-17-year-old females in the U.S. in 2010 had received all three doses of the HPV vaccine, according to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) National Immunization Survey-Teen, which estimates vaccine coverage for this age group. There are significant ethnic disparities: black and Hispanic youth within this sample were less likely than white youth to have completed the series. Socioeconomic status is correlated with vaccine completion: Thirteen-to-17-year-old youth in 2010 living below the poverty level were less likely to have completed the HPV series.4 Overall, Minnesota vaccine completion rates for adolescents mirror those for the entire U.S.4 In 2010, only 51.3% of 13-to-17-year-old adolescents in Minnesota had received one or more doses of the HPV vaccine, and only 37.8% had completed the series. A text message reminder program for 9-20 year old girls and young women in NYC has proven effective in improving HPV completion rates.
  • A text message reminder program for 9-20 year old girls and young women in NYC has proven effective in improving HPV completion rates. The intervention group, the youth who enrolled in the text message reminder program, were statistically more likely to receive the next HPV vaccine on time compared to those who did not enroll and the historical controls (over 51% versus 35% and 38%). This difference was sustained 4 months after the HPV vaccine dose was due and the difference remained after controlling for insurance and site of care. Text message reminders to promote human papillomavirus vaccinationElyse OlshenKharbanda, Melissa S. Stockwell, Harrison W. Fox, Raquel Andres, Marcos Lara, and Vaughn I. RickertVaccine, 2011-03-21, Volume 29, Issue 14, Pages 2537-2541
  • The objectives for my presentation are as followsDefine new media technologies and their use by adolescentsDescribe how healthcare organizations are using new media technologies to better serve adolescents (as I do this I will speak about some work with new techologies I am involved with)Review use of new media technologies to improve immunization ratesConsider incorporating new media technologies into your work with youthThroughout this presentation, I will reference examples of various new media that you may want to use with adolescents or just learn more about the organizations behind them.
  • So as you consider using new media strategies in your work with youth, I suggest that you devise targeted strategies, know who you are appealing to and what would work with them. It is important to learn from young people what would work with them. I often ask young people I work with what they want to know more about.Other keys to successful new media strategies include ensuring that they allow one to connect with another. Therefore, the strategies need to be interactive and encourage participation. This leads to concerns about privacy, particularly use of adolescent information for commercial or criminal justice purposes. The ACLU has a project to increase awareness about privacy issues and technology, dotRights. They have tools to help developers embed strong privacy controls in new media strategies. Their public campaign is found at http://www.dotrights.org/.As I mentioned earlier, successful strategies use a varied approach. A developer I am using made it clear to me that even with newer tools like Twitter, a robust website for one’s organization is key—it is the home that users will access.Finally, with increasing number of youth using mobile devices a strategy needs to be optimized for mobile use. For example, allow youth and their families to access your organization’s new media without being impeded by complicated graphics and data that takes a long time to download. The blog platform I use, Word Press allows for this. I have a $100 annual subscription that allows me to use this platform.
  • Started January 2012598 posts7,813 viewsNutrition and sexual health topics are the most popular
  • Here’s a screens shot of my blog. Dealing with comments, not many followers, it takes time!
  • Then on day I discovered how to see where I have been read and once again am humbled by the reach of these new technologies. This is what keeps me doing this.
  • In summary, new media use is ubiquitous, particularly by adolescents. Adolescents use new media to access health information.Youth-serving organizations, particularly those working to get and keep teens healthy, are successfully using new media strategies. Finally, I hope you can see, as I am learning through my work as drj4teenhealth, that you can successfully include a new media strategy in your work with adolescents.Thank you for your attention. I posted this presentation on my blog, drj4teenhealth.com

Transcript

  • 1. Objectives 1. Define new media technologies and their use by adolescents 2. Describe how healthcare organizations are using new media technologies to better serve adolescents 3. Review use of new media technologies to improve immunization rates 4. Consider incorporating new media technologies into your work with youth 1
  • 2. Text messaging 2 • HPV vaccine completion rates are poor • There are ethnic and SES disparities • Text message reminder program in a variety of 9 clinical sites in NYC for females 9-20 years old
  • 3. 3 Text message reminders to promote human papillomavirus vaccination Elyse Olshen Kharbanda, Melissa S. Stockwell, Harrison W. Fox, Raquel Andres, Marcos Lara, and Vaughn I. Rickert Vaccine, 2011-03-21, Volume 29, Issue 14, Pages 2537-2541
  • 4. Objectives 1. Define new media technologies and their use by adolescents 2. Describe how healthcare organizations are using new media technologies to better serve adolescents 3. Review use of new media technologies to improve immunization rates 4. Consider incorporating new media technologies into your work with youth 4
  • 5. Successful new media strategies 1. Targeted 2. Encourages connection 3. Interactive/participatory 4. Combines a variety of media strategies 5. Optimized for mobile use 5
  • 6. drj4teenhealth.com @DrJ4TeenHealth • Started January 2012 • 598 posts • 7,813 views • Nutrition and sexual health topics are the most popular 6
  • 7. 1. New media use is ubiquitous 2. Adolescents use new media to access health information 3. Youth-serving organizations are successfully using new media strategies 4. www.drj4teenhealth.com 9 Summary