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Digital heritage tools in Ireland - a review (Sharon Webb & Aileen O'Carroll)
Digital heritage tools in Ireland - a review (Sharon Webb & Aileen O'Carroll)
Digital heritage tools in Ireland - a review (Sharon Webb & Aileen O'Carroll)
Digital heritage tools in Ireland - a review (Sharon Webb & Aileen O'Carroll)
Digital heritage tools in Ireland - a review (Sharon Webb & Aileen O'Carroll)
Digital heritage tools in Ireland - a review (Sharon Webb & Aileen O'Carroll)
Digital heritage tools in Ireland - a review (Sharon Webb & Aileen O'Carroll)
Digital heritage tools in Ireland - a review (Sharon Webb & Aileen O'Carroll)
Digital heritage tools in Ireland - a review (Sharon Webb & Aileen O'Carroll)
Digital heritage tools in Ireland - a review (Sharon Webb & Aileen O'Carroll)
Digital heritage tools in Ireland - a review (Sharon Webb & Aileen O'Carroll)
Digital heritage tools in Ireland - a review (Sharon Webb & Aileen O'Carroll)
Digital heritage tools in Ireland - a review (Sharon Webb & Aileen O'Carroll)
Digital heritage tools in Ireland - a review (Sharon Webb & Aileen O'Carroll)
Digital heritage tools in Ireland - a review (Sharon Webb & Aileen O'Carroll)
Digital heritage tools in Ireland - a review (Sharon Webb & Aileen O'Carroll)
Digital heritage tools in Ireland - a review (Sharon Webb & Aileen O'Carroll)
Digital heritage tools in Ireland - a review (Sharon Webb & Aileen O'Carroll)
Digital heritage tools in Ireland - a review (Sharon Webb & Aileen O'Carroll)
Digital heritage tools in Ireland - a review (Sharon Webb & Aileen O'Carroll)
Digital heritage tools in Ireland - a review (Sharon Webb & Aileen O'Carroll)
Digital heritage tools in Ireland - a review (Sharon Webb & Aileen O'Carroll)
Digital heritage tools in Ireland - a review (Sharon Webb & Aileen O'Carroll)
Digital heritage tools in Ireland - a review (Sharon Webb & Aileen O'Carroll)
Digital heritage tools in Ireland - a review (Sharon Webb & Aileen O'Carroll)
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Digital heritage tools in Ireland - a review (Sharon Webb & Aileen O'Carroll)

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Presented at Cultural Heritage, Creative Tools & Archives, National Museum of Denmark, Copenhagen (26-27 June 2013) …

Presented at Cultural Heritage, Creative Tools & Archives, National Museum of Denmark, Copenhagen (26-27 June 2013)

This paper reviews the user tools currently in use by Irish Cultural Heritage organisations. We highlight that key challenges for those providing user tools are associated with issues of preservation and sustainability of digital tools, and argue that for cultural heritage organisations the provision of digital tools is as important as providing access to the digital content stored, harvested and aggregated. This review draws on qualitative interviews carried out by the Digital Repository of Ireland (DRI) in order to inform requirements specifications, policy statements, user guidelines and best practices.

Published in: Technology, Education
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  • 1. Dr Sharon Webb Requirements Analyst, Digital Repository of Ireland (An Foras Feasa, NUIM) Dr Aileen O’Carroll Policy Manager, Digital Repository of Ireland (IQDA, NUIM) Conference: Cultural Heritage, Creative Tools & Archives, National Museum of Denmark, Copenhagen (26-27 June 2013) Digital heritage tools in Ireland - a review
  • 2. Objectives of this presentation/paper Introduction to DRI DRI Stakeholder engagement and requirements Cultural heritage tools - a review Challenges - preservation & sustainability Conclusion
  • 3. What/Who is DRI? The Digital Repository of Ireland is an interactive national trusted digital repository (TDR) for contemporary and historical, social and cultural data held by Irish institutions. It is a four-year exchequer funded project, comprising of six Irish academic partners - RIA, NUIM, TCD, NUIG, DIT & NCAD.
  • 4. Current Status Prototype of repository (HYDRA) Open Access to Metadata Statement DRI to mint DOIs International Report (follows National one) In progress: Metadata Task Force, IP/copyright Task Force.
  • 5. DRI Stakeholder Engagement & Requirements Stakeholder interviews served two purposes - requirements elicitation and policy development (understand the domain - the “problem”). We asked about current practices in (“analogue” and digital) archiving. Interviews captured core DRI requirements (from the content providers perspective) but more importantly helped foster relationships (and “trust”).
  • 6. Caring for Digital Data - Cultural Institutions
  • 7. Caring for Digital Data - Archives
  • 8. Caring for Digital Data - Universities & Academic
  • 9. Caring for Digital Data - Research Institutes
  • 10. Aileen O’Carroll & Sharon Webb, Digital Archiving in Ireland - national survey of the humanities & social sciences (2012). Launched at DRI’s Autumn Workshop (2012).
  • 11. Content provider’s view point DRI’s core business requirement - a TDR (& all the functional requirements that satisfy this). Content providers want assurances that DRI is sustainable e.g. can provide sustainable access to ingested content (long-term preservation). “Trust” cannot be over-stated (techno-social).
  • 12. Content provider’s view point Need to reduce barriers to sharing/ingesting data into DRI. • Support multiple metadata standards • Support multiple data types • Ingest (command line as well as web form) • Export functionality • Access controls Developed “with” the community & not just “for”.
  • 13. But...Content provider’s view point is one perspective... ...we (DRI) and they (CHI) need to engage the [digital] audiences (...the end user) and reduce “barriers to engagement”. (Prince, 2013). Access to data is not enough given significant increases in user expectations. We asked about current digital tools supplied, as well as future tools/developments.
  • 14. Content users (and end user tools). Interviewees discussed the provision of digital tools to “reach, converse with, enthuse and promote [specific] actions among an audience]”. (Prince, 2013). Digital tools can include “...websites, social media, email and mobile technologies...” (Prince, 2013).
  • 15. Digital cultural heritage tools Cultural Institutions are custodians of our digital cultural heritage The end-users (the researcher, the net/izen...) are the (target) digital audience for content reuse - they are why we “preserve” these objects. Focused here on “online” tools (not offline).
  • 16. Digital cultural heritage tools Finding aids were cited as the most important “tool” 60% also provided additional tools - annotation software, crowd sourcing tools, network mapping, interactive maps, online exhibitions, interactive guides, educational tools, various visualisation for query results, mobile apps... ” “
  • 17. Digital cultural heritage tools RTÉ Archives Irish Museum of Modern Art National Library of Ireland National Gallery of Ireland - user created exhibitions (light box). “ ”
  • 18. Digital cultural heritage tools - multiple channels All interviewees were cognisant of the need to manipulate, and use, multiple digital channels to optimise user engagement. For example, National Library of Ireland and Military Archives use Flickr Commons (among other social media sites). Use of multiple channels enrich the collection & enables the users (citizens, diaspora) to feel part of the national, historical narrative.
  • 19. Digital cultural heritage tools - multiple devices Mobile app development (developing mobile friendly services) • Augmented reality (Ireland Under Siege) • Library Catalogues This provides “content in the right channels for the audience” - reflecting changes in user habits and usage patterns (web traffic and device usage).
  • 20. Digital cultural heritage tools - visualisations Tools mentioned so far focus on reuse & repurposing of image, text, audio & moving image. But numerical, geo-spatial & statistical data sets: • Mapping Interfaces • Mapping visualisations/tools (AIRO, CCL) Also 3-D objects, timelines.
  • 21. Digital cultural heritage - sharing cultural data
  • 22. Challenges Much of these tools consider and deal with “digitised” material. (Cultural v’s Research Institutions) Entering a new phase for digital cultural heritage material - born digital (& digital only) material - storage as well as rendering challenges. Computational, data analysis tools - big data (big humanities not only big science), pattern matching, data mining.
  • 23. Challenges Long-term preservation means sustainable access - it must consider the form as well as the functionality of the object. Need to preserve the tools that make sense of data sets, digital objects, etc. but also the user generated content. These tools become part of our digital cultural heritage - part of national, historical narrative & public interaction & engagement.
  • 24. Challenges Defining the user communities so that tools are developed to meet an appropriate need, at an appropriate scale. Future developments - IKIWISI (I’ll know when I see it)! Challenge to DRI - An interactive TDR to satisfy both the content providers and the content users (“prod-users”). Resources - funding & technical.
  • 25. Thank you for your attention. Any questions, comments.... sharon.webb@nuim.ie aileen.ocarroll@nuim.ie

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