Submission to Infrastructure Australia Proposal in support of  Collaborative Infrastructure Transport and Logistics Centre...
<ul><li>TALC is a public funded research and policy think tank whose mandate covers the transport and logistics (T&L) indu...
<ul><li>The building of industry capability relies heavily on government intervention in all areas – especially  the provi...
Infrastructure  typically refers to the technical structures that support a society, such as  roads ,  water supply ,  was...
<ul><li>If we accept the previous excerpt from WIKIPEDIA  as a working definition, then the notion of infrastructure broad...
PHYSICAL INFRASTRUCTURE = PORTS, ROADS, RAIL, WAREHOUSES, CONCRETE, STEEL, STRUCTURES, BUILDING, MOVING, STORING
DIGITAL INFRASTRUCTURE = BROADBAND, SATELLITES, MOBILE PHONES, COMPUTERS, INTERNET, COMMUNICATION, DATA, ACCESS, OPEN, FAS...
COLLABORATIVE INFRASTRUCTURE = COMMUNITIES, NETWORKS, REGIONS, BUSINESS GROUPS, FORUMS, LEARNING, SHARING, CREATING, COMPE...
PHYSICAL INFRASTRUCTURE QUESTIONS: LOCATION? COST? OWNERSHIP? ACCESS? FUNDING? INTEGRATION? MAINTENANCE? USAGE? INVESTMENT...
SIMPLIFIED MATRIX OF ASSET TYPE BY ASSET FUNCTIONALITY ECONOMIC TYPE SOCIAL TYPE ENVIRONMENTAL TYPE PHYSICAL INFRASTRUCTUR...
Collaborative infrastructure – why bother?  <ul><li>Reach – by its nature (virtual and social) collaborative infrastructur...
Collaborative infrastructure – value for money? <ul><li>relatively low set up costs </li></ul><ul><li>enhances digital and...
TALC offers TILIS  ®  as an example of national Collaborative Infrastructure  <ul><li>TILIS ®   stands for  T otally  I nt...
TILIS ®  is hard to grasp <ul><li>Most people don’t </li></ul><ul><li>care about the intricacies of computing and communic...
So let’s think in physical terms <ul><li>Think about a shipping port, airport, or similar, they :  </li></ul><ul><li>are m...
Now think of TILIS ®  as a  digital port <ul><li>In the digital space you can build infrastructure fast, once and anyone, ...
TILIS ®  as a digital “port” <ul><li>Like a physical port TILIS ®  is a digital solution that can provide: </li></ul><ul><...
TILIS ®  maps the industry  <ul><li>TILIS ®  is: </li></ul><ul><li>An  ATLAS  = A view of the transport and logistics indu...
TILIS ®  removes noise and can be configured to your needs
TILIS ®  connects and adds volume to existing networks Open Access Commercial/ Marketplace Universal Individual Mega-Porta...
TILIS ®   moves beyond the  one to many marketplace  One provider to multiple users with a complex array of expensive asse...
TILIS ®   enables the many to  many marketplace  <ul><li>Many users connecting once, with reducing and sharing infrastruct...
TILIS ®   can be the first of many <ul><li>TILIS ®  will be the first iteration of a ‘industry-side’ digital infrastructur...
TILIS®  uses global standards Singapore IMS Asia PROMETEUS CEN/ISSS ISO/IEC JTC1 SC36 ARIADNE ALIC & AEN Dublin Core AICC ...
Technical view of TILIS ®   FMS = freight matching service LMS = learning Management System CMS = Content Management Syste...
TILIS ®   gateway and content providers
National TILIS ®  (APPLICATION) EXAMPLE: integrate TILIS ®  CORDRA iteration with national education infrastructure Public...
TILIS ®   can become part of an Federated national or State solution After Dan Rehak  ADL Update SCORM 2004 and CORDRA , N...
The TILIS pilot was completed in June 2007
TILIS ® . Totally. The first of many: Mining Health Water Manufacturing Tourism Energy the list is long! A federated Web 2...
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Submission To Infrastructure Australia2

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Submission To Infrastructure Australia2

  1. 1. Submission to Infrastructure Australia Proposal in support of Collaborative Infrastructure Transport and Logistics Centre (TALC) Dr Daryll Hull September 2008
  2. 2. <ul><li>TALC is a public funded research and policy think tank whose mandate covers the transport and logistics (T&L) industry in Australia </li></ul><ul><li>The T&L industry is a critical enabler of the entire Australian economy </li></ul><ul><li>T&L contributes approximately 14.5% of GDP – more than mining and agriculture combined </li></ul><ul><li>It employs over 1,000,000 people across the country in every region, city and remote location </li></ul><ul><li>There are over 165,000 organisations /businesses in the industry </li></ul><ul><li>Average employment is less than 5 people per organisation – this is a sector of small business and diverse operations </li></ul><ul><li>TALC has created many programmes to assist the industry – go to www.talc.com.au </li></ul>What is TALC and why does it have an interest in infrastructure?
  3. 3. <ul><li>The building of industry capability relies heavily on government intervention in all areas – especially the provision of infrastructure </li></ul><ul><li>Infrastructure in T&L consists of different categories of assets – physical, digital and collaborative </li></ul><ul><li>Physical assets comprise three types – economic, social and environmental </li></ul><ul><li>Digital assets comprise hardware and software </li></ul><ul><li>Collaborative assets comprise business and networks, clusters and social technologies for connecting people </li></ul><ul><li>Infrastructure Australia has an obligation to address all three types of assets in T&L in order to build national capability in this most critical sector of the Australian economy </li></ul>What are the dimensions to infrastructure in T&L?
  4. 4. Infrastructure typically refers to the technical structures that support a society, such as roads , water supply , wastewater , power grids , flood management systems, communications (internet, phone lines, broadcasting), and so forth. In the past, these systems have typically been owned and managed by local or central governments. These various elements may collectively be termed civil infrastructure, municipal infrastructure, or simply public works , although they may be developed and operated as private-sector or government enterprises. A more generic definition of infrastructure is the network of assets &quot;where the system as a whole is intended to be maintained indefinitely at a specified standard of service by the continuing replacement and refurbishment of its components.&quot; [1] In other applications, infrastructure may refer to information technology , informal and formal channels of communication, software development tools, political and social networks , or beliefs held by members of particular groups. Still underlying these more general uses is the concept that infrastructure provides organizing structure and support for the system or organization it serves, whether it is a city , a nation , or a corporation . Economically, infrastructure could be seen to be the structural elements of an economy which allow for production of goods and services without themselves being part of the production process, e.g. roads allow the transport of raw materials and finished products. (1) Association of Local Government Engineers New Zealand: &quot;Infrastructure Asset Management Manual&quot;, June 1998 - Edition 1.1 Definition of “infrastructure” from WIKIPEDIA online encyclopaedia
  5. 5. <ul><li>If we accept the previous excerpt from WIKIPEDIA as a working definition, then the notion of infrastructure broadens beyond a physical asset class to include digital, social and community assets </li></ul><ul><li>In T&L this is logical , as we find ourselves moving into the realm of 3PL and 4PL logistics systems – such systems require strong digital, communications, computing, organisation and management systems to ensure maximum effectiveness of physical assets </li></ul><ul><li>There is a case to be made that further development of T&L physical infrastructure should be combined with a parallel development of digital and social infrastructure, utilising our latest understanding of collaborative technologies and social systems </li></ul><ul><li>It is also likely that a combination of public and private capital and skills will be required to make best use of the various technologies and opportunities in T&L </li></ul><ul><li>The following pages outline the “big picture” in T&L infrastructure </li></ul>T&L – a special case in infrastructure development?
  6. 6. PHYSICAL INFRASTRUCTURE = PORTS, ROADS, RAIL, WAREHOUSES, CONCRETE, STEEL, STRUCTURES, BUILDING, MOVING, STORING
  7. 7. DIGITAL INFRASTRUCTURE = BROADBAND, SATELLITES, MOBILE PHONES, COMPUTERS, INTERNET, COMMUNICATION, DATA, ACCESS, OPEN, FAST, EVERYWHERE
  8. 8. COLLABORATIVE INFRASTRUCTURE = COMMUNITIES, NETWORKS, REGIONS, BUSINESS GROUPS, FORUMS, LEARNING, SHARING, CREATING, COMPETING, CONTENT
  9. 9. PHYSICAL INFRASTRUCTURE QUESTIONS: LOCATION? COST? OWNERSHIP? ACCESS? FUNDING? INTEGRATION? MAINTENANCE? USAGE? INVESTMENT? ENVIRONMENT? ENERGY? DIGITAL INFRASTRUCTURE QUESTIONS: ACCESS? SPEED? BANDWIDTH? TECHNOLOGY? SECURITY? FUNDING? OWNERSHIP? INVESTMENT? INTEGRATION? USAGE? COST? COLLABORATIVE INFRASTRUCTURE QUESTIONS: CONNECTIVITY? COMMUNITY? VALUES? PARTICIPATION? ACCESS? COMPLEXITY? SHARING? SUSTAINING? NETWORKING? COMMONALITY? MEMBERSHIP? EACH ONE LINKS TO THE OTHERS FEEDBACK CONNECTS ALL OF THEM, AND THEY OFTEN INHABIT MORE THAN ONE SPACE AT THE SAME TIME
  10. 10. SIMPLIFIED MATRIX OF ASSET TYPE BY ASSET FUNCTIONALITY ECONOMIC TYPE SOCIAL TYPE ENVIRONMENTAL TYPE PHYSICAL INFRASTRUCTURE ROADS, PORTS, BRIDGES, RAILWAYS, POWER STATIONS, WATER WORKS SCHOOLS, COLLEGES, HOSPITALS, PARKS, COMMUNITY CENTRES WATER, SOIL AND AIR QUALITY ASSETS, DAMS, IRRIGATION SCHEMES DIGITAL INFRASTRUCTURE BROADBAND, SATELLITES, FIBRE NETWORKS, EXCHANGES, MOBILE DATA TERMINALS, RFID MOBILE PHONES, PERSONAL COMPUTERS, PUBLIC ACCESS TERMINALS SATELLITE MAPPING AND MONITORING SYSTEMS, REMOTE SENSING SYSTEMS COLLABORATIVE INFRASTRUCTURE ONLINE FREIGHT MATCHING, VIRTUAL CONTAINER PARKS, WEB 2.0 PORTALS COMMUNITIES OF PRACTICE, RESEARCH ASSOCIATIONS, INDUSTRY FORUMS EMISSIONS TRADING SCHEMES, ENVIROMENTAL WEB GATEWAYS
  11. 11. Collaborative infrastructure – why bother? <ul><li>Reach – by its nature (virtual and social) collaborative infrastructure can provide maximum reach across the chosen community. It is limited only by access to the Internet, formation of communities of interest and general access via membership. In theory as well as practice a good piece of collaborative infrastructure can reach 100% of a selected audience </li></ul><ul><li>Results – collaborative infrastructure builds shared ownership of ideas and assets. It constitutes a powerful mechanism for implantation of strategy and programmes because it builds support as it goes </li></ul><ul><li>Resources – this class of infrastructure asset is not capital intensive. Once it is set up the operating costs are spread across the community of interest. Maintenance costs are limited to the software architecture and ICT technologies utilised in the asset </li></ul><ul><li>Risk - failure of a collaborative asset is easily accommodated through “switching off” the asset, and if necessary reconstituting it under another banner or group </li></ul>
  12. 12. Collaborative infrastructure – value for money? <ul><li>relatively low set up costs </li></ul><ul><li>enhances digital and physical assets </li></ul><ul><li>minimal labour costs </li></ul><ul><li>minimal operating costs </li></ul><ul><li>low maintenance </li></ul><ul><li>maximum reach for any given audience </li></ul><ul><li>able to create community ownership of asset and ideas </li></ul><ul><li>low risk </li></ul><ul><li>supports regional development </li></ul><ul><li>supports small business </li></ul><ul><li>creates new business services in Web 2.0 applications </li></ul><ul><li>scalable </li></ul><ul><li>flexible </li></ul><ul><li>possibility of open access </li></ul><ul><li>possibility of open standards </li></ul>
  13. 13. TALC offers TILIS ® as an example of national Collaborative Infrastructure <ul><li>TILIS ® stands for T otally I ntelligent L ogistics I nquiry S ervice </li></ul><ul><li>TILIS® was developed by TALC over three years and is now available to industry </li></ul><ul><li>TILIS ® establishes a national transport and logistics (T&L) industry web gateway </li></ul><ul><li>TILIS ® is a piece of shared digital infrastructure focused on the T&L industry, designed to provide high levels of interconnection between many users and providers of useful information, business services, industry knowledge and new ideas </li></ul><ul><li>TILIS ® is demonstrated at www.tilis.com.au </li></ul>
  14. 14. TILIS ® is hard to grasp <ul><li>Most people don’t </li></ul><ul><li>care about the intricacies of computing and communications </li></ul><ul><li>care about infrastructure (especially if it is virtual!) </li></ul><ul><li>want to deal with the complexity </li></ul><ul><li>want to have to understand it </li></ul><ul><li>but they do want </li></ul><ul><li>someone to ‘build’ it for them </li></ul><ul><li>it to work for them </li></ul><ul><li>access when they want, how they want </li></ul>
  15. 15. So let’s think in physical terms <ul><li>Think about a shipping port, airport, or similar, they : </li></ul><ul><li>are major investments in infrastructure and networks </li></ul><ul><li>are common capabilities everyone can use thus increasing their activities </li></ul><ul><li>stimulate volume activity, thus cost reduction and value are positively affected (Moore Principle) </li></ul><ul><li>connect local with global </li></ul><ul><li>are solutions driven by social and business needs, not the technology solutions that underpin their operation </li></ul><ul><li>encourage use of scalable, reliable existing technology </li></ul><ul><li>use standards to maximise connection and efficiencies </li></ul><ul><li>connect multiple supply chains seamlessly </li></ul><ul><li>(THIS PROBABLY SOUNDS FAMILIAR) </li></ul>
  16. 16. Now think of TILIS ® as a digital port <ul><li>In the digital space you can build infrastructure fast, once and anyone, anywhere can use it </li></ul><ul><li>There is no current national digital port for the T&L industry </li></ul><ul><li>TILIS ® takes for form and shape of the desired industry application. It can be an education and training portal, a business exchange, a publishing/news portal or a simple discovery tool </li></ul><ul><li>TILIS ® can work to connect many groups simultaneously across the web, or it can act as an enterprise system working within the business to connect individuals who need to share knowledge e.g. HR professionals </li></ul>
  17. 17. TILIS ® as a digital “port” <ul><li>Like a physical port TILIS ® is a digital solution that can provide: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A gateway that is both a map and single access point to the T&L industry </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Infrastructure able to be configured to users needs and preferences </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>National network hub connecting and adding volume to local Web sites and services in the T&L or other industries </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Network able to transition only one-to-one business supply chains to the new many-to-many global marketplaces </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Shared infrastructure capability for everyone in the industry, public or private can leverage to reduce their operational expenditure while maximising value </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Benchmark standards for connections, content and knowledge sharing </li></ul></ul>
  18. 18. TILIS ® maps the industry <ul><li>TILIS ® is: </li></ul><ul><li>An ATLAS = A view of the transport and logistics industry based on your needs and preferences </li></ul><ul><li>A MAP = A repository of destinations and data </li></ul><ul><li>A GPS = A registry that allows you to discover where you are and search for digital information that helps you get where you need to go </li></ul><ul><li>By being virtual TILIS is more dynamic and able to be oriented to the user needs and preferences. This differentiates it from a mere website, which is a static and limited information source </li></ul>
  19. 19. TILIS ® removes noise and can be configured to your needs
  20. 20. TILIS ® connects and adds volume to existing networks Open Access Commercial/ Marketplace Universal Individual Mega-Portal (e.g. Google) B2B/Trading Portal Government Portal TILIS Industry
  21. 21. TILIS ® moves beyond the one to many marketplace One provider to multiple users with a complex array of expensive assets that require massive, duplicated capital investment
  22. 22. TILIS ® enables the many to many marketplace <ul><li>Many users connecting once, with reducing and sharing infrastructure to address: </li></ul><ul><li>Interoperation </li></ul><ul><li>Metadata </li></ul><ul><li>Classification </li></ul><ul><li>Search </li></ul><ul><li>Discovery </li></ul><ul><li>Identity management </li></ul><ul><li>Access rights </li></ul><ul><li>Reuse </li></ul><ul><li>Digital rights </li></ul>
  23. 23. TILIS ® can be the first of many <ul><li>TILIS ® will be the first iteration of a ‘industry-side’ digital infrastructure providing shared, mostly open source solutions for: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>User-oriented Web and portal design (W3C and national standards will be applied) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Discovery and access to content by implementing the C ontent O bject R epository D iscovery and R egistration A rchitecture model (provides the first global standard for linking any content repository to any user based on the content owner’s permissions) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Access management and identity management solutions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Learning and technical object exchange through application of ADL Sharable C ontent O bject R eference M odel and E uropean A ssociation of A erospace I ndustries S1000D </li></ul></ul>
  24. 24. TILIS® uses global standards Singapore IMS Asia PROMETEUS CEN/ISSS ISO/IEC JTC1 SC36 ARIADNE ALIC & AEN Dublin Core AICC API and CMI data model based on the AICC CMI document and widespread SCORM usage are now approved IEEE standards. LOM (metadata) is an approved IEEE standard. CETIS/JISC eLIG From Dan Rehak (2005) ADL Update SCORM 2004 and CORDRA
  25. 25. Technical view of TILIS ® FMS = freight matching service LMS = learning Management System CMS = Content Management System LINC = South Australian Logistics Information Navigation Centre Portfolio HRIS Tradegate Intermodal Terminal META DATA and Web Services Synergistic Layer Tools/Objects and Services Integration Layer CORDRA, QTI etc Core Business Systems User Interface Interpretive Layer Snap-in Interoperable protocol TILIS LINC TOOLS CMS LMS FMS
  26. 26. TILIS ® gateway and content providers
  27. 27. National TILIS ® (APPLICATION) EXAMPLE: integrate TILIS ® CORDRA iteration with national education infrastructure Public Individual gateway interfaces (client “windows”) User data (Administration) Portfolios LMS Competency University TAFE T&L company Associations TILIS clients Search Document library gateway Applications (“services”) Individuals Organisation Content providers … … Resources … CORDRA interface TILIS Identifiers Content Exchange (shared repository) University TAFE Transport company Assoc. National services CORDRA Registry Access and Identifier infrastructure Infrastructure services Content Content
  28. 28. TILIS ® can become part of an Federated national or State solution After Dan Rehak ADL Update SCORM 2004 and CORDRA , Nov 2005
  29. 29. The TILIS pilot was completed in June 2007
  30. 30. TILIS ® . Totally. The first of many: Mining Health Water Manufacturing Tourism Energy the list is long! A federated Web 2.0 gateway project

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