• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Adolescent Literacy Intervention Programs, Dr. Patricia Fioriello
 

Adolescent Literacy Intervention Programs, Dr. Patricia Fioriello

on

  • 8,328 views

Presentation explains components of literacy intervention, levels and courses, assessment and placement, and scheduling options. Designed for San Francisco Unified School District based on need to ...

Presentation explains components of literacy intervention, levels and courses, assessment and placement, and scheduling options. Designed for San Francisco Unified School District based on need to connect literacy intervention to program scheduling for middle and high school assistant principals. Contact if interested in having a literacy intervention presentation designed for your school or district.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
8,328
Views on SlideShare
6,151
Embed Views
2,177

Actions

Likes
1
Downloads
64
Comments
0

6 Embeds 2,177

http://kidslearntoblog.com 1017
http://highschoolmediator.com 603
http://drpfconsults.com 546
http://www.slideshare.net 9
http://asdemo2.blackboard.com 1
http://translate.googleusercontent.com 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • Dr. Patricia Fioriello

Adolescent Literacy Intervention Programs, Dr. Patricia Fioriello Adolescent Literacy Intervention Programs, Dr. Patricia Fioriello Presentation Transcript

  • Workshop designed for San Francisco Unified School District Pupil Services Department
    • Workshop designed for San Francisco Unified School District’s Pupil Services Department
    • Dr. Patricia Fioriello
    • Education Consultant
    • www.drpfconsults.com
    • March 11, 2008
    • ADOLESCENT LITERACY
    • INTERVENTION
    • PROGRAMS
    • Components
    • And
    • Connections
    Dr. Patricia Fioriello, Education Consultant, March 11, 2008
  • Overview
    • Section One
    • Understanding Adolescent Literacy
    • Definitions, Instruction vs. Structure, Strategy
    • Workshop Focus
    • Section Two
    • Adolescent Literacy Intervention Program
    • Levels and Courses
    • Assessment & Placement Guidelines
    • Scheduling Options
    • Extended Learning Opportunities
    • Section Three
    • Site Level Intervention literacy Program
    • Issues, Challenges, Solutions
    • Section Four
    • Pupil Services and The Site
    • Immediate and Next Steps
    Dr. Patricia Fioriello, Education Consultant, March 11, 2008
  • Workshop Focus & Outcome
    • Understand and examine the structure (as it relates to Pupil Services areas) of site literacy intervention program.
    • Problem-solve and develop a strategy , approach to site and District concerns.
    Dr. Patricia Fioriello, Education Consultant, March 11, 2008
    • ADOLESCENT LITERACY INTERVENTION
    • Definition
    • Instruction vs. Structure
    • Strategy
    SECTION ONE Dr. Patricia Fioriello, Education Consultant, March 11, 2008
    • Terms we often use at work may have different
    • meanings to individuals who work together. Take a
    • few minutes and explain what the following terms
    • mean to you.
    • Literacy
    • Adolescent Literacy
    • Intervention
    • Adolescent Literacy Intervention Program
    THINK & SHARE Dr. Patricia Fioriello, Education Consultant, March 11, 2008
  • What is Literacy?
    • "Literacy can be defined on a number of levels. It is obviously
    • concerned with the ability to read and write but a fuller
    • definition might be the capacity to recognize, reproduce and
    • manipulate the conventions of text shared by a given
    • community.”
    • Hertrich, John. 1998. HMI Secondary Literacy Survey
    Dr. Patricia Fioriello, Education Consultant, March 11, 2008
  • What is Literacy?
    • “ The ability to understand and employ printed information in
    • daily activities at home, at work and in the community to
    • achieve one’s goals, and to develop one’s knowledge and
    • potential.”
    • www.thenetwork.co.uk/providertoolkit/glossary
    Dr. Patricia Fioriello, Education Consultant, March 11, 2008
  • What is Adolescent Literacy?
    • “ Middle and high school students who encounter difficulties in reading generally fall into one of three
    • groups (Schoenbach, Greenleaf, Cziko, & Hurwitz,
    • 1999).
    • Some have severe deficits in reading that can be traced back to weak decoding skills. A second group may know enough phonics to laboriously sound out words, but they become so focused on decoding that they lose all sense of the meaning of the words and sentences.
    Dr. Patricia Fioriello, Education Consultant, March 11, 2008
    • But most struggling adolescent readers have no trouble
    • decoding words. These students‘ difficulties are caused by
    • the fact that they have limited vocabularies or lack broad
    • background knowledge to apply to their reading, and thus
    • they cannot create meaning.
    • Such students, although often not recognized as struggling
    • readers by content teachers, are found in most middle and
    • high school classrooms across the country.”
    • Darwin, M. and Fleischman, S. 2005. “Research Matters/Fostering Adolescent Literacy. The Adolescent Learner. ASCD.
    Dr. Patricia Fioriello, Education Consultant, March 11, 2008
  • What are Adolescent Literacy Intervention Programs?
    • “ Adolescent literacy intervention programs” are those programs that
    • (1) specifically target teachers of and/or students in middle and high school grades (Grades 4-12) who are reading significantly below grade level and
    • (2) provide literacy instruction that is intended to increase achievement at a rate faster than average, allowing
    • students to decrease or close the achievement gap between themselves and their normally achieving peers.
    Dr. Patricia Fioriello, Education Consultant, March 11, 2008
    • Programs may be intended as core or supplemental for an entire class, an individual, or a small group and may include laboratory or computer based instruction (or any combination of the various kinds of instruction).
    Dr. Patricia Fioriello, Education Consultant, March 11, 2008
    • The instruction may be in reading or content-based venues. However, the intention of the program must be to help students who are struggling with literacy, and the focus of the program must be on a least one aspect of literacy instruction.”
    • Learning Point Associates. 2005 . .
    Dr. Patricia Fioriello, Education Consultant, March 11, 2008
  • Basic Components of a Literacy Program Dr. Patricia Fioriello, Education Consultant, March 11, 2008
  • Instruction vs. Structure
    • content
    • curriculum
    • materials
    • learning strategies
    • informal, daily assessment
    • program plan
    • infrastructure improvements
    • extended time
    • summative assessment (progress monitoring)
    • Instruction
    • Structure
    THINK CLASSROOM! THINK SUPPORT! Dr. Patricia Fioriello, Education Consultant, March 11, 2008
    • “ A survey of the literacy field shows that educators now have a powerful array of tools at their disposal. We even know within a fair degree of certitude which tools work well for which type of struggling reader.
    Intervention Strategy Dr. Patricia Fioriello, Education Consultant, March 11, 2008
    • However, we do not yet possess an overall strategy for directing and coordinating remedial tools for the maximum benefit to students at risk of academic failure, nor do we know enough about how current programs and approaches can be most effectively combined.”
    • Biancarosa, C., & Snow, C. E. (2006). Reading next-A vision for action and research in middle and high school literacy: A report to Carnegie Corporation of New York (2nd ed.).Washington, DC: Alliance for Excellent Education.
    Dr. Patricia Fioriello, Education Consultant, March 11, 2008
  • Pupil Services Components Structure Strategy Dr. Patricia Fioriello, Education Consultant, March 11, 2008
    • LITERACY INTERVENTION PROGRAM
    • Levels
    • Guidelines
    • Options
    • Learning Opportunities
    SECTION TWO Dr. Patricia Fioriello, Education Consultant, March 11, 2008
  • Intervention Levels
      • Benchmark
      • Strategic
      • Intensive
    Dr. Patricia Fioriello, Education Consultant, March 11, 2008
  • Benchmark Intervention Level
        • AT OR NEAR GRADE LEVEL
        • Achieving grade level standards.
        • May benefit from ancillary material, tutoring, software assistance, differentiated instruction. Students who are satisfactorily achieving grade-level standards but on occasion may require additional assistance and support for particular standards and concepts.
        • Intervention Programs for Students @ www. cde.ca.gov
    Dr. Patricia Fioriello, Education Consultant, March 11, 2008
  • Strategic Intervention Level
        • UP TO TWO YEARS BELOW GRADE LEVEL
        • High school students who are at or above the sixth grade standards in English-language arts but not able to pass the CAHSEE.
        • Middle-grades students who are a year behind grade-level expectations. They may be one to two standard deviations below the mean on standardized tests.
      • Intervention Programs for Students @ www. cde.ca.gov
    Dr. Patricia Fioriello, Education Consultant, March 11, 2008
  • Intensive Intervention Level
      • MORE THAN TWO YEARS BELOW GRADE LEVEL
        • High School students unable to demonstrate proficiency in the sixth grade standards in English-language arts.
        • Middle School students who are two or more years behind grade-level expectations. These students have the greatest need and are usually at high risk for potential retention or for later failing the CAHSEE.
      • Intervention Programs for Students @ www. cde.ca.gov
    Dr. Patricia Fioriello, Education Consultant, March 11, 2008
  • Assessment & Placement Multiple Measures to Assess Students Multiple Measures to Place Students District Placement Criteria Dr. Patricia Fioriello, Education Consultant, March 11, 2008
  • Use of Multiple Measures to Assess Students
    • California Standards Test (CST), California Achievement Test 6 (CAT6), California English Language Development Test (CELDT)
    • Core class placement tests
    • Intervention placement tests
    • Other site data
    Dr. Patricia Fioriello, Education Consultant, March 11, 2008
  • Use of Multiple Measures to Place Students
      • Clear entry and exit criteria
    • CELDT 1, 2 administer EL High Point DPI
    • EO and CELDT 3, 4, 5 administer Core Entry Level Test
    • Review CST scores
      • Below 290 intensive intervention placement test
      • 290 or above place in core + strategic
    Example in Packet Dr. Patricia Fioriello, Education Consultant, March 11, 2008
  • Use of District Placement Criteria Recommendations are just that- recommendations. It is important for each district to go through the process of establishing assessment and placement guidelines that will work for their schools! What is your district placement criteria for intervention students? Dr. Patricia Fioriello, Education Consultant, March 11, 2008
  • Benchmark & Strategic Program Guidelines
    • Benchmark Intervention
    • Differentiate instruction for diverse needs of students.
    • Strategic Intervention
    • Shadow class should consist of curriculum and material directly related in the core.
    Dr. Patricia Fioriello, Education Consultant, March 11, 2008
    • Two levels per year.
    • When in doubt “push up” students.
    • Fast paced! The intention is to move students as soon as possible.
    • Best to have one program for district.
    • If student has not demonstrated progress after two years move student from intensive intervention and have student participate in a “catch up” plan.
    • NO STUDENT SHOULD BE IN INTENSIVE INTERVENTION FOR MORE THAN FOUR SEMESTERS!
    Intensive Program Guidelines Dr. Patricia Fioriello, Education Consultant, March 11, 2008
  • Benchmark & Strategic Intervention Classes
    • Benchmark
      • Core Class
      • Continue to provide support for students in class.
    • Strategic (Core + Support Class)
      • Core Class
        • Use state adopted curriculum and program.
      • Shadow Class
        • Design standard curriculum - “Preview-Review.”
      • What about the many academic literacy classes at schools?
    What about the many academic literacy classes we have at schools? Are they part of the intervention program? Dr. Patricia Fioriello, Education Consultant, March 11, 2008
  • Intensive Intervention Classes
    • Intensive Intervention
      • Use of State Adopted Reading Intervention Programs
        • Language!, Read 180, SRA/Reach, Fast Track,
        • High Point (EL)
        • Fidelity to curriculum necessary in order to know if program is REALLY working.
      • Where do they fit in the structure of the Literacy intervention
      • program?
    Dr. Patricia Fioriello, Education Consultant, March 11, 2008
  • Scheduling Options
    • Be honest and realistic about scheduling options.
    • Are students being moved along with the possibly of being set up for failure, or are students being given the additional opportunities to master the skills necessary to be successful in school?
    Dr. Patricia Fioriello, Education Consultant, March 11, 2008
  • Scheduling Options
    • Ask yourself the following questions?
    • Is it better to have students not take an elective class because they need to take intervention classes?
    • Is it better for students to attend additional classes before, after school and summer because of their need to take intervention classes?
    • Is administration willing to take the risk, and maybe not graduate as many students in four years because some students may need an additional year to meet graduation requirements?
    Dr. Patricia Fioriello, Education Consultant, March 11, 2008
  • Scheduling Options
    • The real question to ask yourself:
    • “ Do you believe in intervention programs enough to change the programs you offer and the way you offer them?”
    When scheduling intervention students, there is no magic fix. There is only so much you can do. However, if you look at the bigger picture, find connections, decide priorities, and determine guidelines, the process may not be so overwhelming. Dr. Patricia Fioriello, Education Consultant, March 11, 2008
  • Master Schedule
    • The Only Rule You Need to Know…
    • THE MASTER SCHEDULE
    • MUST BE STUDENT DRIVEN!
    Dr. Patricia Fioriello, Education Consultant, March 11, 2008
  • Master Schedule Steps
    • Have placement data available to determine numbers.
    • Tallies are the start of creating a master schedule that will
    • work. It is important to be accurate with the number of
    • sections needed.
    • Create intervention schedules first.
    • Core classes next – first ELA and then Mathematics.
    • REFER TO HANDOUT FOR EXAMPLES
    Example in Packet Dr. Patricia Fioriello, Education Consultant, March 11, 2008
  • Master Schedule Steps
    • Design sample schedules that would meet the needs of different types of students.
    • Offer varying levels of intervention during the same period to make it easier to move students who may be misplaced.
    • Assign qualified teachers to intervention classes.
    • Program students who require intensive intervention first.
    • Dr. Patricia Fioriello, Educational Consultant, March 11, 2008
    Dr. Patricia Fioriello, Education Consultant, March 11, 2008
  • Master Schedule Recommendations
    • Remember:
    • Teachers do not select classes. While developing the
    • master schedule identify schedules as “Teacher A”, “Teacher
    • B”, etc.
    • Always think in terms of the student schedule. Walk through
    • different scenarios. If Student X needs two intervention
    • classes, what would the rest of their schedule look like and
    • how many students are in this position?
    Dr. Patricia Fioriello, Education Consultant, March 11, 2008
  • Mapping out Intensive Intervention (ELA, Mathematics, or both) and ELD course requirements and 4-5 year program plans will help make decisions when trying to decide scheduling priorities. Example in Packet Dr. Patricia Fioriello, Education Consultant, March 11, 2008
  • Extended Learning Opportunities Do You Agree With The Following Statements? Dr. Patricia Fioriello, Education Consultant, March 11, 2008
  • Extended Learning Opportunities
    • Additional support and resources for students (and the
    • school) are necessary if we are going to meet the needs
    • of ALL students.
    YES or NO? Dr. Patricia Fioriello, Education Consultant, March 11, 2008
  • Extended Learning Opportunities
    • We cannot initiate change and additional requirements without revisiting the extended learning opportunities available for students.
    YES or NO? Dr. Patricia Fioriello, Education Consultant, March 11, 2008
  • Extended Learning Opportunities
    • Intervention programs force us to look at things differently. If we keep trying to place more programs into the same structure, it will break. We must make priorities and expand and redesign our current structure.
    YES or NO? Dr. Patricia Fioriello, Education Consultant, March 11, 2008
  • Extended Learning Opportunities Your “YES” or “NO” answers will determine your approach to new and different learning opportunities. Dr. Patricia Fioriello, Education Consultant, March 11, 2008
  • Integration of Areas Many times we only look at the end result (a master schedule that works) but first we must understand that components are dependent on each other. It is an integrated process and to get the best results we must be comprehensive in our approach. Dr. Patricia Fioriello, Education Consultant, March 11, 2008
  • Integration of Areas Dr. Patricia Fioriello, Education Consultant, March 11, 2008
    • What is a literacy intervention issue at your site?
    • Name one literacy intervention issue at your site.
    • Share the issue with your group.
    • Post on wall under appropriate heading.
    • Review type and number of issues in each area.
    Dr. Patricia Fioriello, Education Consultant, March 11, 2008 THINK & SHARE
    • SITE LEVEL STRATEGY
    • Issues
    • Challenges
    • Solutions
    SECTION THREE Dr. Patricia Fioriello, Education Consultant, March 11, 2008
  • Common Placement Issues “ Students are not appropriately placed in reading intervention classes.” “ What about EL and Sp Ed students?” “ No diagnostic test results are available for incoming 9 th graders.” “ Students are in intervention class for too long but they have not mastered the skills necessary to move forward.” Dr. Patricia Fioriello, Education Consultant, March 11, 2008
  • Common Placement Challenges
    • My four year plan may not be the same as another school.
    • My four year plan looks like a five year plan.
    • I don’t have the resources to provide additional classes.
    Can you name other challenges? Dr. Patricia Fioriello, Education Consultant, March 11, 2008
  • Common Placement Solutions
      • Create district placement criteria guidelines.
      • Develop a “catch up plan” for students.
    Can you name other solutions? Dr. Patricia Fioriello, Education Consultant, March 11, 2008
  • Common Program Issues “ How can I graduate intervention students in 4 years?” “ The master schedule does not allow me to place intervention students in classes.” “ The academic literacy class at our school is different than other schools, and in fact, varies from class to class in our school!” “ We do not offer a support class for strategic students.” Dr. Patricia Fioriello, Education Consultant, March 11, 2008
  • Common Program Challenges
    • Cannot get school to agree on content of academic literacy class.
    • No room in the master schedule for intervention classes.
    • Four year plan may not be the same as another school.
    • Do not have the resources to provide additional classes.
    • Four year is really a five year plan.
    Can you name other challenges? Dr. Patricia Fioriello, Education Consultant, March 11, 2008
  • Common Program Solutions
    • Common definition of intensive intervention and how to serve students.
    • Approach master schedule from the intervention prospective.
    • Design 4-5 year academic plan for intervention students.
    Can you name other solutions? Dr. Patricia Fioriello, Education Consultant, March 11, 2008
    • Your site may have many of the challenges we just talked about but it is impossible to tackle everything at once. If you were to name your biggest literacy intervention challenge, what would it be? Walk through the steps to determine your challenge.
    • Meet in small group to discuss challenges.
    • Select one challenge challenges and brainstorm solutions.
    • Report out.
    THINK & SHARE Dr. Patricia Fioriello, Education Consultant, March 11, 2008
    • PUPIL SERVICES & THE SITE
    • Immediate Action
    • Next Steps
    SECTION FOUR Dr. Patricia Fioriello, Education Consultant, March 11, 2008
  • Pupil Services & the Site
        • Immediate Action to Take…
        • COMPLETE THE MASTER SCHEDULE!
    Dr. Patricia Fioriello, Education Consultant, March 11, 2008
  • Consider the Following
        • Revisit data.
        • Organize the process and steps (start small and work your way out.)
        • Create sample schedules and use as a guideline.
        • Stay with a task until you have the results you need (what you put in is what you get out.)
        • Have a commitment from staff and central office that student needs will come first.
        • Remember that if intervention is your number one priority then something else will not be your number one priority.
    Dr. Patricia Fioriello, Education Consultant, March 11, 2008
  • Pupil Services Next Steps
        • Plan to implement solutions.
        • Decide top priorities to tackle next year.
        • Develop action plan and implementation timeline.
        • Ask individuals to get involved in committees.
        • Develop criteria, guidelines, and policy.
        • Continue collaboration and problem solving.
    Dr. Patricia Fioriello, Education Consultant, March 11, 2008