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PDX ed summit handout 031611

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  • Content, no matter how brilliant, creative, abstract, or controversial, is not inherently viral. There is no viral content Psychological Share Motivation: Emotions – sharing a feeling with a friend Identity and Self Expression -- the content we share online increasingly defines our personality to our friends
  • attributes common to many viral videos and campaigns Distinctiveness is required for all transmittable ideas. To learn means getting new information Connections to the content are paramount. The personal motivation for sharing content is driven by how well something connects or resonates with the person exposed to it. Ideas connect initially because they’re relevant. Psychological Share Motivation: Emotions – sharing a feeling with a friend Identity and Self Expression -- the content we share online increasingly defines our personality to our friends
  • Why do you want to create a video? Who is your audience? Really, who will watch? Cost|Benefit analysis. Do you need to manage your ROI? When to sub out? This will take twice as long as expected. Do you have the time and support? What is your story? If it has multiple parts then you probably want multiple videos. Time… when is long too long.
  • Don’t say “Everybody” Be specific How will the video be delivered (embedded on a webpage or blog or streamed from a different site)? How will the audience interact with the content and associated calls-to-action? Who is my audience? Demographics? Technical or non-technical? What do they already know? What motivates? Beliefs? Location & Culture Daily Challenges Benefits from your solution?
  • The process begins at the end Define your objective Identify your audience Choose your medium and channel Pick a credible messenger
  • Thousands of messages every day. What will make people stop and pay attention to message? Disruptive Surprising New information or research Something uncharacteristic
  • Establish Setting: Provide rich details time of day location social conditions Set the scene & give context.
  • 4. Humanize: Stories are about people Showcase something human about your hero Personal stories creates connection with audience.
  • Build the Tension: What is the consequence of failure? Tension creates story framework Be a skeptical viewer Identify the issues and control them. Conflict resolution
  • Deliver the Turning Point: The “ah-hah” moment A breakthrough Intensifies the emotional connection to your audience
  • Communicate the Outcome: The moral of the story? What has changed Why it matters Next action
  • When viewer sees a video they don’t just hear, they listen. They read body language of speaker They judge the truth of the message by looking at the eyes’ is it credible? It is important as a storyteller you stop and listen to your message with the same perspective as your audience. Listening can never be under rated
  • Be certain to say you don’t have to write a script. For some it makes them feel better to have a script… approvals, organization, scope, target For others it can feel overwhelming. Do what makes sense for you…
  • Eyelevel is neutral There is a psychology to camera height There are noticeable differences in how your subject appears
  • Whether we realize it or not, all Hollywood films are employing some kind of lighting technique to produce their image Poor lighting is the bane of most low-budget and amateur video .We tend to think that all we need is a camera and a story, but in reality, we need a well exposed image We can use lights to properly expose and image or draw particular attention to a part of an image
  • What is a key light? What is a fill light?
  • Demo with class
  • Demo with class
  • White balance - The problem comes when you are trying to use two different color temperatures for lighting.
  • --...it gets at deep truths.. you’re face-to-face with other people...see the human soul.   --The interview hopes to gain access to another person's life, the purpose is to find out what someone else knows or feels.   --some people find the interview a release...a chance to talk out painful situations... I interview a rape and incest victim once and after the interview I asked them why they were willing to talk about this kind of stuff. They said talking to strangers about is part of their healing process.   --Don't ask your important questions before the tape rolls. --pick good environment...relationship between the subject and background is nice i.e. fisherman and his boat, musician in the studio or backstage.   --Be sensitive, but assertive...keep eye contact...GIVE VISUAL, NOT VERBAL RESPONSES TO ANSWERS, UNLESS IT'S A 2 CAM SHOOT AND YOU’RE A HOST OR THE ON-CAM TALENT. DON'T SAY, 'UH HUH' WHILE THE PERSON IS TALKING. --Don't ask the questions that can't be answered by one word. --Begin interview with factual stuff...save emotional stuff for later   --SILENCE IS GOLDEN (if you're trying to get a response from a delicate question, sometimes the best thing to do is say nothing and hope they crack!)   --if you're afraid to ask a question, ease into it softly...i.e. "I know this is a tough thing for you to talk about but can you tell us why you ate 200 aspirins when you have what appears to most people a promising career?"
  • --The Interview is the heart of the documentary...it gets at deep truths.. you’re face-to-face with other people...see the human soul.   --The interview hopes to gain access to another person's life, the purpose is to find out what someone else knows or feels.   --some people find the interview a release...a chance to talk out painful situations... I interview a rape and incest victim once and after the interview I asked them why they were willing to talk about this kind of stuff. They said talking to strangers about is part of their healing process.   --Don't ask your important questions before the tape rolls. --pick good environment...relationship between the subject and background is nice i.e. fisherman and his boat, musician in the studio or backstage.   --Be sensitive, but assertive...keep eye contact...GIVE VISUAL, NOT VERBAL RESPONSES TO ANSWERS, UNLESS IT'S A 2 CAM SHOOT AND YOU’RE A HOST OR THE ON-CAM TALENT. DON'T SAY, 'UH HUH' WHILE THE PERSON IS TALKING. --Don't ask the questions that can't be answered by one word. --Begin interview with factual stuff...save emotional stuff for later   --SILENCE IS GOLDEN (if you're trying to get a response from a delicate question, sometimes the best thing to do is say nothing and hope they crack!)   --if you're afraid to ask a question, ease into it softly...i.e. "I know this is a tough thing for you to talk about but can you tell us why you ate 200 aspirins when you have what appears to most people a promising career?"
  • Revolution in small cameras. Zi8 has external mic jack.
  • No need for separate video and still cameras anymore, get used to having it all in the same place. These cameras go wide, react quickly, and shoot HD video – which is a must these days. If you really want a separate rig to shoot video, pick up a flip video camera (they’re the namesake of Flip the Media, so they must be pretty great)
  • The quality of audio will make or break your work, so it’s worth the money to do it right. Audio Technica ATR3350 Omnidirectional Condenser Lavalier Microphone This lavaliere mic is great for mic-ing video interviews get good sound running into your audio recorder, Make sure the cord is long enough. Zoom H4n Handy Portable Digital Recorder audio recorder costs as much as my camera You’ll use this guy to record ambient sounds and interviews and then put still photos over the top. You’ll use it to record sync sound for videos, to cover up the bad quality audio you get from your camera. And you’ll use it to record interviews so you can quote the person later without having to take perfect notes. Plus the little tripod and SD card that comes in this kit works with your camera too, and it comes with headphones – wear em!
  • It’s not a $2000 video camera that separates professional video from home movies. It’s that the professionals use a tripod. At this price, you’re not getting a tripod that will deliver smooth camera moves — your best bet is to keep the camera still and let the action happen in front of it. I know, your tiny camera looks funny on that big tripod. You weren’t doing this to look cool, were you? SLIK’s exclusive A.M.T. super Aluminum-Magnesium-Titanium alloy legs make the PRO 340 BH tripod in black very steady. The A.M.T. alloy has a 40% greater strength to weight ratio than standard aluminum. This makes the legs lighter and stronger than the standard metal used in most tripods. This compact tripod has 4 legs sections to collapse down to just over 20 inches, making the PRO 340 BH great for traveling and backpacking How small does it need to get? 4- or 5- section legs pack smaller, but each joint makes the tripod less stable. What material? Aluminum's a little heavier. Frankly, if the aluminum one is less than 10 pounds there's no reason to spring for carbon fiber. Carbon fiber is great for tripods that need the strength for a 600mm f/5.6 lens or a 4x5 monorail camera, where the aluminum tripod will weigh more than 30 pounds. For an amateur travel tripod it's just money spent on nothing. Finally, what kind of head do you want? Most consumer tripods come with a pan and tilt head, which has the handle sticking out behind the camera. These are great for still shots, but really suck when you're trying to shoot something that's moving, like birds or cars or whatever. If you want to be able to use your tripod with moving subjects find something with a ball head. They work more like a free joint between the tripod and the camera, so it swings freely without having to adjust two different axises. Oh! Make sure you get one with a quick release! Most tripods do these days, but using a tripod without one is a giant pain in the ass.
  • Vegas Movie Studio HD has everything you need to produce movies in spectacular high definition. Editing HD is simple; just drop your clips on the timeline and go to work. Its high-performance engine is beyond fast—see your changes happen in real time. You can even work simultaneously with standard-definition and high-definition video in the same project. When you're done, export your movie in a variety of HD formats for easy sharing.

Transcript

  • 1. Creating Powerful, Engaging Videos DREW KELLER aka Your Video Survival Guide
  • 2.  
  • 3. Why Do We Cher Content?
  • 4. Why Do We Share Content?
  • 5. Why We Share Ideas Connect Personal Distinctive
  • 6. PREPRODUCTION
  • 7. Rules
    • Really there are none
    • More like Guidelines
    • Common practices proven to be effective
  • 8. 3 Big Questions
      • What are Expectations?
      • What is your story?
  • 9. Who is Your Audience? 3 Big Questions
  • 10. STORYTELLING
  • 11. 7 Steps of Storytelling
    • Craft the Foundation
  • 12.
    • Grab Attention
    7 Steps of Storytelling
  • 13.
    • 3. Establish Setting
    7 Steps of Storytelling
  • 14.
    • 4. Humanize
    7 Steps of Storytelling
  • 15. 7 Steps of Storytelling
    • 5 . Build the Tension
  • 16.
    • 6. Deliver the Turning Point
    7 Steps of Storytelling
  • 17.
    • 7 . Communicate the Outcome
    7 Steps of Storytelling
  • 18. Storytelling
    • Breaking a story into smaller segments
    • Each story needs:
    • Beginning
    • Middle
    • End
  • 19. Listen
  • 20. SCRIPTING
  • 21. Do You need a Script?
    • Extemporaneous is an option
    • Most every video improves with a script
  • 22. How Do You Script a Video?
    • Outlining ideas
      • Leverage the work you have already done
      • Even if Ad-Libbing write it out first… focus thoughts and ideas
      • Keep it singularly focused
      • Keep it short.
  • 23. SHOOTING YOUR STORY
  • 24. What we’ll cover in the next few minutes…
    • Environment
    • The Basics of Framing
      • Focal Length
      • Camera Height
      • Rule of Thirds
    • Sequencing
  • 25. How does environment shape your story?
  • 26. Environment
    • The environment tells part of the story
  • 27. The environment is a character in your story. It frames your subject and gives clues to your audience.
  • 28. What does the shot tell the audience?
  • 29. Even an abstract background should frame your story
  • 30. Avoid unlit, unattractive, and unappealing backgrounds.
  • 31. Look carefully at the background of your shot. Get rid of clutter, white walls, distracting backgrounds
  • 32.
    • There is a psychology to camera height
    • There is a psychology to the size of your subject in their environment
  • 33.  
  • 34. Camera Height
    • Consider the height of the camera as you tell your story.
  • 35.  
  • 36. Rule of 3rds
    • Shooting with the rule of thirds
  • 37.  
  • 38.  
  • 39. Zoom
    • When to use your zoom…
    • When to use your feet
    • Fixed-focus wide angle, pocket cameras
    • Depth of field
  • 40. Sequencing
    • Using pictures to tell your story
    • Break the story into smaller pieces
    • Think of individual images like sentences in a paragraph. Each builds to the next.
    • Beginning… Middle End
  • 41. Sequencing to tell your Story Vary angles, camera height, use simple composition, tell your story with pictures
  • 42. Zoom
    • When to use your zoom…
    • When to use your feet
    • Fixed-focus wide angle, pocket cameras
    • Depth of field
  • 43. SHOOTING WORKSHOP
    • Gather into teams of 3
    • Think of a simple Sequence
      • It should be an action
      • Plan out your shots & framing
    • Shoot your sequence
    • You have 30 minutes
  • 44. Tripods
    • Why use a tripod?
  • 45.  
  • 46. Tripods
    • The human tripod – how to stand, brace the camera, brace yourself
  • 47.  
  • 48. Tripods from Everyday Stuff
  • 49. StoryGuide - Web
  • 50. LIGHTING
  • 51. Why should we light our productions?
    • Lighting will make your work look more professional
  • 52. Lighting
    • 3 point lighting
  • 53. 3 Point Lighting
  • 54. Lighting Progression
    • No Lighting
  • 55. Lighting Progression
    • Key Light
  • 56. Lighting Progression
    • Key and Fill lights
  • 57. Lighting Progression
    • Key, Fill, and background lights
  • 58. Lighting Progression
    • Key, Fill, and background projection
  • 59. Lighting
    • Practical Lights
      • How can I use my desk lamp for the best effect?
      • How can I use the window?
      • How can I use a wall as a reflector?
  • 60.  
  • 61. Lighting and Color Temperature
    • In video lighting there are two main color temperatures
      • 5,600K is known as Daylight.
      • 3,200K is know as Indoor or Tungsten lighting, this is most of the lighting that you will see from a lamp.
    • White Balance tells your camera what type of lighting you are using in the given situation
  • 62. Lighting
    • Perils of available light
      • Back lighting – those pesky silhouettes
      • Mixed temperature – “Look! Ed is a Cheeto! And Sally is Blue!”
      • Overhead lighting – Raccoon Eyes
  • 63. What has happened here? How to fix it?
  • 64. The perils of white walls, overhead lighting and no key light
  • 65. AUDIO
  • 66. Microphones
    • Camera mics
      • Stereo
      • Mono
    • External mics
      • Mini v. XLR
      • connectors
      • Omni directional
      • Shotgun
      • Lavaliere
      • Wireless
  • 67. Microphones
      • Monitoring your audio
      • USB Mics
  • 68.  
  • 69. INTERVIEWS
  • 70. Interview Tips
    • The Interview is the heart of a story
    • The interview hopes to gain access
    • Don't ask your important questions before the tape rolls
    • Be sensitive, but assertive...keep eye contact
  • 71. Interview Tips
    • Try to ask self-contained, open-ended questions that will provoke a longer response from the subject
    • GIVE VISUAL, NOT VERBAL RESPONSES TO ANSWERS
    • Silence is golden
  • 72. PRODUCTION RECOMMENDATIONS
  • 73. Small Format Cameras
    • Kodak Zi8 $130
    • Flip Mino $150
  • 74. Point and Shoot
    • Sony Cybershot DSC HX5V
    • Panasonic Lumix DSC zs7
  • 75. Audio Audio Technica ATR3350 Omnidirectional Condenser Lavaliere Microphone $20 Zoom H4n Handy Portable Digital Recorder $350
  • 76. Tripod Silk, Joby, Monfrotto $150
  • 77. Production Software Vegas Movie Studio HD $45 Adobe Photoshop & Premiere Elements 9 $135
  • 78.
    • Resources
    • How To
      • StoryGuide
      • Izzy Video
      • TV Production
    • Links
      • Little Digital Video Book
      • Shut Up and Shoot
      • The Bare Bones Camera Course
      • WindowsLive MovieMaker Tutorial
      • IntoWindows MovieMaker Tutorials