Lumbar disc prolapse

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Lumbar disc prolapse

  1. 1. J.J.M MEDICAL COLLEGE DAVANGERE SEMINAR ON
  2. 2. HISTORY Aurelianus (5th century) clearly described thesymptoms of SCIATICA. Andreas Vesalius (1543) first described theintervertebral disc. Middleton & Teacher (1911) described a case ofparaplegia following attempting to lift heavy weight fromfloor on postmortem they found fibrocartilage in extraduralspace. Elseberg (1928) described Chondromas derived fromdisc of cervical region.
  3. 3.  Stookey (1928) described cartilaginous compression thought as chondromas responsible for clinical prersentation. Dandy (1929) reported removal of a disc tumour or chondroma from patients with sciatica. Mixter and Barr (1934) described disc herniation as the cause of Sciatica.
  4. 4.  Peet& Echols (1934) referred to as Chondroma or Ecchondrosis was really protrusion of intervertebral disc. Lindblom(1948) first described DISCOGRAPHY. Lyman Smith (1963) described CHEMONUCLEOLYSIS. Kambin & Gellman (1983) reported percutaneous approach for lumbar discectomy.
  5. 5. LUMBAR SPINE
  6. 6. ANATOMY OF LUMBAR SPINE
  7. 7. INTERVERTEBRAL DISC
  8. 8. NUTRITION TO DISC
  9. 9. FUNCTION OF DISC
  10. 10. FACET JOINTS
  11. 11. LIGAMENTS OF LUMBAR SPINE
  12. 12. MOTION SEGMENTANTERIOR POSTERIOR ELEMENT ELEMENT
  13. 13. DISC & NERVE ROOT RELATION L5 is TRAVERSING NERVE ROOTL5 is EXITINGNERVE ROOT
  14. 14. EFFECT OF AXIAL LOADING
  15. 15. THREE JOINT COMPLEX
  16. 16. RELATION OF INTRADISCAL PRESSURE AND POSTURE
  17. 17. IN RELATION TO POSTURE
  18. 18. CORRECT SLEEPING POSTURE
  19. 19. IN RELATION TO MANUAL MATERIALS HANDLING
  20. 20. LUMBAR DISC PROLAPSEDEFINITION It is condition in which there is outpouching of the disc Nucleus pulposus along with few annular fibres and end plate cartilage through the tears in annulus fibrosus into the extradural space.
  21. 21. EPIDEMIOLOGY• AGE: 30 – 40 years• SEX: Male affected more than female• MOST COMMON LEVEL: L4-L5 (next common level is L5-S1)• MOST COMMON TYPE: Posterolateral type
  22. 22. WHY DISC PROLAPSE IS MOSTCOMMON POSTEROLATERALLY?
  23. 23. ETIOLOGY
  24. 24. EFFECT OF SMOKING Blood vessel get constricted Transport of nutrients & disposal of waste products decreased Disc cells get deficient nutrition or die Disc degenerates & results in DISC INSTABILITY
  25. 25. DISC DEGENERATION
  26. 26. STAGES OF DISC DEGENERATION Stage of dysfunction Stage of instability Stage of stabilization
  27. 27. STAGE OF DYSFUNCTION Episode of rotational Posterior facet joint Small capsular &or compressive trauma & annular strain annular tear occurs Small subluxation of posterior joint Posterior joint SYNOVITIS Posterior segment muscle protect joint by sustained hypertonic contraction
  28. 28. STAGE OF INSTABILITY FACET Degeneration Laxity of JOINT of cartilage capsule INCREASED ABNORMAL MOVEMENT Loss of nucleusDISC Coalescence Bulging of internal of tears annulus disruption
  29. 29. STAGE OF STABILIZATION Destruction Fibrosis inFACET JOINT of cartilage joint INCREASED STIFFNESS DISC Loss of Fibrosis in disc nucleus & osteophytes STABILIZATION
  30. 30. DISC DEGENERATION
  31. 31. PATHOPHYSIOLOGY OF LUMBARINTERVERTEBRAL DISC PROLAPSE With aging, vascular channels start to fail and vascular diffusion of nutrients decrease thus number of viable chondrocytes in the nucleus pulposus diminishes Synthesis rate & concentration of proteoglycans decreases & proportion of collagen increase in nucleus pulposus Water binding capacity of the nucleus decreases Nucleus becomes more fibrous & stiffer Nucleus is less able to bear & disburse load, transferring load to the posterior annulus
  32. 32. Facet joints undergoANNULUS Facet joints share degenerative IN TACT even more of the changes & develop axial load osteophytes FACET JOINT SYNDROME
  33. 33. ANNULUS FAILS
  34. 34. Extruded disc & degraded nuclearmaterial impinge on the nerve rootsNucleus pulposus is animmunogenic whichinduce an inflammatoryresponse Produces radicular pain syndrome & RADICULOPATHY
  35. 35. STAGES OF DISC PROLAPSE
  36. 36. AXIAL LOCATION
  37. 37. SAGITTAL SECTION
  38. 38. ATTITUDE
  39. 39. LIST (SCIATIC SCOLIOSIS)
  40. 40. L4
  41. 41. L5
  42. 42. S1
  43. 43. L3
  44. 44. L2
  45. 45. L1
  46. 46. STRAIGHT LEG RAISING TEST
  47. 47. LASEGUE SIGN
  48. 48. LASEGUE TEST
  49. 49. CONTRALATERAL LEG RAISING TEST (FRAJERSZTAGN TEST)
  50. 50. WHY PAIN OCCURS ON AFFECTEDSIDE ON RAISING NORMAL LEG?AFFECTED SIDE NORMAL SIDE
  51. 51. BOWSTRING TEST
  52. 52. FEMORAL NERVE STRETCH TEST
  53. 53. FLIP TESTNEGATIVE POSITIVE
  54. 54. NAFFZIGER TEST
  55. 55. VALSALVA MANEUVRE
  56. 56. CAUDA EQUINA SYNDROME• Marked reduction in SLRT• Saddle anaesthesia• Bilateral ankle jerk depression• Involuntary overflow incontinence• Decreased tone in external sphincter
  57. 57. DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSISINTRASPINAL CAUSESProximal to disc: Conus and Cauda equine lesions (eg. Neurofibroma, ependymoma)Disc level• Herniated nucleus pulposus• Stenosis (Canal or recess)• Infection: Osteomyelitis or discitis ( with nerve root pressure)• Inflammation: Arachnoiditis• Neoplasm: Benign or malignant with nerve root pressure
  58. 58. EXTRASPINAL CAUSESPelvis• Cardiovascular conditions (eg. Peripheral vascular disease)• Gynaecological conditions• Orthopaedic conditions ( osteoarthritis of hip, Muscle related disease, Facet joint arthropathy)• Sacroiliac joint disease• NeoplasmPeripheral nerve lesions• Neuropathy (Diabetic, tumour, alcohol)• Local sciatic nerve conditions (Trauma, tumour)• Inflammation (herpes zoster)
  59. 59. KEY DIAGNOSTIC POINTSLUMBAR DISC PROLAPSE Leg pain greater than back pain Neurological deficit presentANNULAR TEARS Back pain greater than leg pain Bilateral SLRT positiveFACET JOINT ARTHROPATHY Localized tenderness present unilaterally over joint Pain occurs immediately on spinal extension Pain exacerbated with ipsilateral side bending
  60. 60. SPINAL STENOSIS Back and/or leg pain develops after walks a limited distance. Flexion relieves symptoms No neurological deficit Pain not reproduced on SLRTMYOGENIC OR MUSCLE RELATED Pain localised to affected muscle Pain increases on prolonged muscle use Pain reproduced with sustained muscle contraction against resistance Contralateral pain with side bending
  61. 61. INVESTIGATION THE CORNERSTONE OF DIAGNOSIS OFLUMBAR DISC DISEASE IS THE HISTORY AND PHYSICAL EXAMINATION NOT THE INVESTIGTION.
  62. 62. PLAIN RADIOGRAPH OSTEOPHYTE DECREASED DISC SPACE
  63. 63. NORMAL RETROSPONDYLOLISTHESIS
  64. 64. MARKEDRETROSPONDYL OLISTHESIS
  65. 65. REDUCTION IN THE HEIGHT OF THE PEDICLE
  66. 66. FORWARDDISPLACEMENT OF L3 OVER L4
  67. 67. MYELOGRAPHY
  68. 68. DISADVANTAGE OF MYELOGRAPHY• Myelographyis capable of showing the level at which the pathology lies but fails to show the nature of the lesion or its precise location in the anatomic segment .
  69. 69. DISCOGRAHY
  70. 70. USES OF DISCOGRAPHY• To evaluate equivocal abnormality seen on myelography, CT or MRI• To isolate a symptomatic disc among multiple level abnormality• To diagnose a lateral disc herniation• To establish contained discogenic pain• To select fusion levels• To evaluate the previously operated spine
  71. 71. CT DISCOGRAPHYUSES• To determine whether the disc herniation is contained, protruded, extruded or sequestrated.• To evaluate previously operated lumbar spine to distinguish between mass effect from scar tissue or disc material.
  72. 72. COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHYADVANTAGES• CT is an extremely useful, highly accurate & noninvasive tool in the evaluation of spinal disease.• CT provides superior imaging of cortical and trabecular bone compared with MRI.• It provides contrast resolution and identify root compressive lesions such as disc herniation.• It also helps to differentiate between bony osteophyte from soft disc.• It helps to diagnose foraminal encroachment of disc material due to its ability to visualize beyond the limits of the dural sac and root sleeves.
  73. 73. LIMITATIONS• It cannot differentiate between scar tissue and new disc herniation• It does not have sufficient soft tissue resolution to allow differentiation between annulus and nucleus.
  74. 74. MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING• It allows direct visualization of herniated disc material and its relationship to neural tissue including intrathecal contents.
  75. 75. INDICATIONS FOR SPINE IMAGING• Presence ofunderlying systemic disease• Progressive neurological deficits• Cauda equine syndrome• Candidate for therapeutic intervention• Failed clinically directed conservative therapy
  76. 76. CONTRAST ENCHANCED MRI• Here GADOLINIUM labeled diethylenetriaminepentaacetate (Gd-DTPA) administered intravenously and MRI scan done.ADVANTAGES• Display the inflammatory reaction critical to the pathophysiology of radicular pain or radiculopathy• Allows discrimination of scar from recurrent disc.
  77. 77. OTHER DIAGNOSTIC TESTS• ELECTROMYOGRAPHY – to rule out peripheral neuropathy.• SOMATOSENSORY EVOKED POTENTIALS (SSEP) – to identify the level of root involvement• POSITRON EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY
  78. 78. TREATMENT• CONSERVATIVE• SURGICAL
  79. 79. CONSERVATIVE Majority of disc prolapse respond well toconservative therapy. Resolution of first discprolapse takes place approximately 75% ofpatients over a period of 3 months.
  80. 80. BED REST
  81. 81. PHYSIOTHERAPY
  82. 82. EXERCISESGENERAL RULES FOR EXERCISE• Do each exercise slowly. Hold the exercise position for a slow count of five.• Start with five repetitions and work up to ten. Relax completely between each repetition.• Do the exercises for 10 minutes twice a day.• Care should be taken when doing exercises that are painful. A little pain when exercising is not necessarily bad. If pain is more or referred to the legs the patient may have overdone it.• Do the exercises every day without fail.
  83. 83. FOR ACUTE STAGEBRIDGING EXERCISE KNEE HUGS
  84. 84. FOR RECOVERY OR SUBACUTE STAGE EXTENSION CONTROL HAMSTRING STRETCH KNEE ROLLS
  85. 85. YOGAASANAS TADASANA(Mountain pose) MARICHYASANA III BHARADVAJASANA (Marichis Pose) (Bharadvajas Twist)
  86. 86. VIRABHADRASANA II ARDHA URDHVA MUKHA (Warrior II Pose) SVANASANA (Half Upward-Facing Dog Pose) BALASANA (Childs Pose)
  87. 87. UTTHITA PARSVAKONASANA UTTHITA TRIKONASANA (Side Angle Pose) (Triangle Pose) SHAVASANNA (Corpse Pose)
  88. 88. DO’S & DON’T’S
  89. 89. EPIDURAL STEROID INJECTION
  90. 90. CHEMONUCLEOLYSIS Chymopapain Degrades the Water holdinginjected into the proteoglycans in the capacity of the disc disc nucleus is decreased Shrinkage of the disc
  91. 91. CONTRAINDICATION FOR CHEMONUCLEOLYSIS• Sequestrated disc• Significant neurological deficit• Disc herniation with lateral stenosis• Cauda equine syndrome• Previous treatment with chymopapain• Spinal tumour• Recurrence of disc herniation• Spondylolisthesis• Pregnancy• Diabetic Neuropathy
  92. 92. SURGERYGOAL To relive neural compression and henceradiculopathy while minimizing complications.
  93. 93. INDICATIONSABSOLUTE• Bladder and bowel involvement: The cauda equine syndrome• Increasing neurological deficitRELATIVE• Failure of conservative treatment• Recurrent sciatica• Significant neurological deficit with significant SLR reduction• Disc rupture into a stenotic canal• Recurrent neurological deficit
  94. 94. CONTRAINDICATIONS FOR SURGERY• Wrong patient ( poor potency for recovery)• Wrong diagnosis• Wrong level• Painless HNP (do not operate for primary complaint of weakness or paresthesia, in the absence of pain)• Inexperienced surgeon applying poor technical skills• Lack of adequate instruments
  95. 95. KNEE CHEST POSITION
  96. 96. HEMI OR PARTIAL LAMINECTOMY
  97. 97. FENESTRATION
  98. 98. TOTAL LAMINECTOMY
  99. 99. LAMINOTOMY & DISCECTOMY
  100. 100. COMPLICATIONS OFLAMINECTOMY AND DISCECTOMY• Infection – Superficial wound infection , Deep disc space infection• Thrombophlebitis/ Deep vein thrombosis• Pulmonary embolism• Dural tears may result in Pseudomeningocoele, CSF leak, Meningitis• Postoperative cauda equine lesions• Neurological damage or nerve root injury• Urinary retention and urinary tract infection
  101. 101. FAILED BACK SYNDROME It is a condition characterized by persistent postoperative backache and sciatica.VERY COMMON CAUSES• Recurrent/ Persistent disc material at operated site• Herniated Nucleus Pulposus at other site• Epidural scar / Fibrosis• Facet arthrosis / Spinal stenosis
  102. 102. COMMON CAUSES – Neuritis, Referred pain from nonspinous siteUNCOMMON CAUSES• Discitis / Osteomyelitis/ Epidural abscess• Arachnoiditis• Conus tumour• Thoracic, High lumbar Herniated Nucleus Pulposus• Epidural haematoma
  103. 103. The recurrence of pain after disc surgeryshould be treated with all availableconservative treatment modalities initially. The surgery should be tailored to theanatomic problem only.
  104. 104. MICRODISCECTOMY
  105. 105. PERCUTANEOUS DISCECTOMY
  106. 106. PERCUTANEOUS SUCTION DISCECTOMY
  107. 107. MICROENDOSCOPIC DISCECTOMY
  108. 108. PERCUTANEOUS LASER DISCECTOMY
  109. 109. LUMBAR ARTIFICIAL DISC REPLACEMENT
  110. 110. Patient not suitable for artificial disc replacement are• Osteoporosis• Spondylolisthesis• Infection or tumour of spine• Spine deformities from trauma• Facet arthrosis
  111. 111. TECHNIQUE
  112. 112. INTRADISCAL ELECTROTHERMAL THERAPY• It is a new minimally invasive technique done as an outpatient procedure.• Done in patients with low back pain caused by tears in the outer wall of the intervertebral disc.
  113. 113. PROGNOSIS• Extruded disc, Large herniations, Sequestrations have a greater tendency to resolution than small herniations& disc bulges.• Recurrence of disc prolapse can be prevented by a proper exercise programme and avoidance of stress to the lower part of back.
  114. 114. REFERENCES• MACNAB’S BACKACHE by DavidA.Wong 4th edition• THE LUMBAR SPINE by Sam W Wiesel 2nd edition• MANAGING LOW BACK PAIN by W.H.Kirkildy – Willis 3rd edition• ORTHOPAEDIC PHYSICAL ASSESSMENT by David Magee 5th edition• ORTHOPAEDIC PRINCIPLE AND THEIR APPLICATION by TUREK 4TH Edition• CAMPBELL’S OPERATIVE ORTHOPAEDICS 11TH EDITION• INTERNET
  115. 115. “LEARN TO BE GOOD TO YOUR BACK AND YOURBACK WILL BE GOOD TO YOU….”

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