Master final-2014-learning-symposium
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Master final-2014-learning-symposium

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Learning symposium

Learning symposium

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  • 1. A question: • https://www.polleverywhere.com/my/polls#!/my/polls
  • 2. TO TEXTBOOK OR NOT TO TEXTBOOK? In order of appearance: Bruce Gilbert Priya Shenoy Teri Koch
  • 3. Overview: • 1) The nature/extent of the problem and proposed solutions (Bruce) • 2) What is already being done at Drake (Priya) • 3) What a few other institutions are doing / future directions (Teri) • 4) How you can get involved • 5) Q and A
  • 4. Overview of this section: • 1) The nature/extent of the problem and proposed solutions (Bruce) • a) Some definitions • b) State of the art and trends • c) What’s driving the changes? • d) Something to keep in mind!
  • 5. Some definitions: • 1) Digital Rights Management (DRM): • “a class of technologies that are used by hardware manufacturers, publishers, copyright holders, and individuals with the intent to control the use of digital content and devices after sale” • EXAMPLE: Adobe Digital Editions, and the “ePub” format
  • 6. Some definitions: • 2) Open Access Initiative (OAI) • OA literature is digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. OA removes price barriers (subscriptions, licensing fees, pay-per-view fees) and permission barriers (most copyright and licensing restrictions). • (See: http://legacy.earlham.edu/~peters/fos/overview.htm ) • It does NOT remove copyright, however! • Example: Oaister.org and Drake’s own eScholarShare
  • 7. Some definitions: • 2) Open Educational Resources (OER) • are teaching, learning, and research resources that reside in the public domain or have been released under an intellectual property license that permits their free use or re-purposing by others. • Example: Merlot.org and “MOOCs” (“sort of” for the latter!)
  • 8. What is an eTextbook? • Definition of “textbook” in an electronic environment is expanding: • Required course material • Course ware • Learning objects • Currently many eTextbooks are digitized print • Flat PDFs (e.g., PDF under glass, like a photocopy) • eTextbooks are evolving to take advantage of technology. • Adaptive tools (context sensitive quizzing) • Cloud based • Study curation tools • Social tools
  • 9. Where does it begin? • 1. “Traditional” textbooks are increasingly over-priced. • A number of faculty have approached librarians about different approaches to “traditional” textbooks that most view as increasingly over-priced.
  • 10. Where does it begin? • 1. “Traditional” textbooks are increasingly over-priced. • A number of faculty had approached librarians about different approaches to “traditional” textbooks that most view as increasingly over-priced. • Have already presented to: • A & S Dept. Chairs • CBPA Faculty meeting • Chemistry • CPHS • Admissions • Deans
  • 11. Where does it begin? • 1. “Traditional” textbooks are increasingly over-priced. • Widespread agreement @Drake: • - Textbook prices are an issue • - If we could get a significant percentage of faculty to use free, or very low-cost, “alternatives,” we could both enhance Drake’s exceptional learning environment and improve our standing among students (prospective AND current)
  • 12. When it comes to inflation.. • http://t.co/YczdeVFHVM
  • 13. Price of texts is NOT trivial! • 1. “Traditional” textbooks are increasingly over-priced. • PIRG Nationwide survey: 65% of all students had decided against buying a textbook because it was too expensive. • In fact, this survey found that 94% of students who had foregone purchasing a textbook were • concerned that doing so would hurt their grade in a course. • More than half of these students felt significant concern for their grade. • Not only are students choosing not to purchase the materials, but they are • knowingly accepting the risk of a lower grade to avoid paying for the textbook. • http://uspirg.org/sites/pirg/files/reports/NATIONAL%20Fixing%20Broken%20T extbooks%20Report1.pdf
  • 14. “Textbook” TRENDS: • 1) Cowles Library has an increasing number of resources (some with no DRM!) available for textbook use. (Priya) • 2) Many alternatives to “bookstore purchase of a textbook by a student” have sprung up. • 3) Open Educational Resources have made it possible to bypass the “textbook” concept altogether.
  • 15. Many alternatives to “bookstore purchase of a textbook by a student” have sprung up.
  • 16. Background: Confluence of trends regarding textbooks • Evolving profit/loss structure for textbooks. Campus bookstores feeling pressure (flat sales, dynamic pricing) • Digital & print rentals on the rise as purchase alternative (e.g., Amazon, Chegg) • Print is still popular; including increasingly custom print (e.g., chapters 2- 3, etc.) • According to Franny Kelly (eTextbook product manager at Wiley) “2016 will be the tipping point for digital” surpassing print in popularity.
  • 17. Amazon: Textbook rentals
  • 18. Chegg: Textbook rentals as alternative to purchase
  • 19. “Open Access” movement • 2. Open Access Initiative has made much available that was not previously accessible
  • 20. “Open Access” movement • 2. Open Access Initiative has made much available that was not previously accessible • Are Drake Faculty “on board” with support for the Open Access Initiative? • YES or NO?
  • 21. “Open Access” movement • 2. Open Access Initiative has made much available that was not previously accessible • Are Drake Faculty “on board” with support for the Open Access Initiative? • The answer is YES. Two ways: • 1) Through putting their scholarship (students and staff, too!) in eScholarShare: http://escholarshare.drake.edu/
  • 22. eScholarShare
  • 23. “Open Access” movement • 2. Open Access Initiative has made much available that was not previously accessible • Are Drake Faculty “on board” with support for the Open Access Initiative? • The answer is YES. Second way: • 2) University-wide policy on Open Access (only University in Iowa to have one)
  • 24. “Open Access” @Drake: Passed April 2013 • Drake University Open Access Policy Text (as amended) • The Faculty of Drake University is committed to disseminating its research and scholarship as widely as possible. The Faculty recognize the public benefit of such dissemination, including that providing greater access to scholarship promotes social justice. This policy is also intended to serve faculty interests by promoting greater reach and impact for scholarly publications, assisting authors’ retention of distribution rights, and ensuring long-term preservation of the scholarly output of the University. • In keeping with these commitments, the Drake Faculty Senate recognizes that Cowles Library has created an Open Access repository of the scholarly output of faculty (eScholarShare). Each faculty member grants to Drake University permission to make electronically available his or her scholarly works that the author has chosen to distribute as Open Access. Drake University will permanently store and index those works for the purpose of open dissemination. In legal terms, under this policy, Drake Faculty author(s) or copyright owner(s) grant to Drake University the non-exclusive, royalty-free right to reproduce, convert to an updated electronic format, publicly display/perform and/or distribute their submission (including the abstract) worldwide in any format or medium, including but not limited to print, photographic, electronic, audio and/or video.
  • 25. “Open Access” movement • 2. Open Access Initiative (and Open Educational Resources(OER)) has made much available that was not previously accessible • How does Open Access (and OER) help the Textbook issue?
  • 26. “Open Access” movement • 2. Open Access Initiative (and Open Educational Resources(OER)) has made much available that was not previously accessible • How does Open Access (and OER) help the Textbook issue? • a) Through repositories of Open Textbooks • and • b) Through repositories of Open Educational Resources
  • 27. “Open Access” movement • How does Open Access (and OER) help the Textbook issue? • Open Textbook Repositories: (MN)
  • 28. “Open Access” movement • 2. Through Open Repositories of Educational Resources: MERLOT.ORG
  • 29. Pt.1, Summary: • If you believe any/all of the following: • a) “Traditional” Textbooks are too expensive • b) Open Educational Resources present exciting new possibilities • c) The Library can help! (more later)
  • 30. Pt.1, Summary: • Drake instructors should NOT be afraid to experiment! • The institution has no current contractual arrangements that would preclude any instructor from adapting a “non-traditional” approach to textbooks!
  • 31. TYPES AND EXAMPLES OF ETEXTBOOKS USED AT DRAKE Priya Shenoy, Pharmacy and Science Librarian Cowles Library, Drake University
  • 32. What are we using at Drake? • Springer • Ebsco eBooks • Access Pharmacy • Ingram Coutts book vendor • APhA’s Pharmacy Library
  • 33. Examples • No DRM • Springer • Epub • Ebsco ebooks • Ingram Coutts • Subscription model • APhA’s Pharmacy Library
  • 34. No DRM - Springer • Unlimited • Concurrent usage • Own in perpetuity! • Save • Print
  • 35. No DRM - Springer •PDF for any eReader •$24.99 b/w “MyCopy” for students
  • 36. No DRM - Springer • Two semester pilot (Math 184-85) Intro Real Analysis I & II - Professor Dan Alexander • Elementary Analysis: The Theory of Calculus • 422 uses and downloads in 2013 • Can’t track after download
  • 37. No DRM - Springer • library.drake.edu
  • 38. Quotes • Professor Dan Alexander • “Cowles Library brings its services to where the students are. I didn't realize the extent to which this was true until one day in class when several students pulled out their smart phones after I had referred to a passage in the book. My first thought was, is the book so bad that its mere mention drives students to texting? My second was to firmly remind them of my no texting policy. But something didn't seem right: they seemed to like the book and my students aren't the type to pull out their phones and text during class. Then it hit me: they had the book stored on their phones for easy access!”
  • 39. Quotes • Professor Dan Alexander: • “This situation repeated itself several times over the semester, and the fact that they could hold their text book in their pocket actually made referring to the text a useful tool in class, far more so than when they have to lug big books around.”
  • 40. Quotes • Professor Dan Alexander • “I loved the opportunity to use the online Springer collection for a text book and plan to use it whenever I can. The book itself was an excellent choice for my two semester Real Analysis course (Math 184-85) and my students appreciated getting it at a reasonable cost. I was little surprised, initially, at least, that almost no one choose hard copy and instead used e-texts, in .pdf, which made the text free.”
  • 41. Epub - Ebsco eBooks • Single/multiuser platform • Variety of publishers (aggregated content) • Downloadable format • DRM controlled via Adobe app • Print/download limitations • Long-term ownership not guaranteed
  • 42. Epub - Ebscso eBooks • Professor Royce Fichtner - FYS 041, “Can you reason with the law?” • An Introduction to the Legal System of the United States
  • 43. Epub - Ebsco eBooks • library.drake.edu
  • 44. Epub - Ebsco eBooks
  • 45. Epub – Ingram Coutts • Therapeutics I, II, & III – course series in Pharm.D. curriculum – Phar 190, 191,192 • Pharmacotherapy Principles and Practice
  • 46. Epub – Ingram Coutts • library.drake.edu
  • 47. Ingram Coutts : Usage • 2nd edition • 2013 = 37,955 section uses • 2014 YTD = 34,859 section uses. • 3rd edition • Sep-Dec 2013 = 3,105 section uses • 2014 YTD = 40,324 section uses.
  • 48. Subscription Model - APhA’s Pharmacy Library • Yearly subscription model – through CPHS • Unlimited access • Multiple tertiary resources • Other functionalities • Active Learning Exercises, NAPLEX review
  • 49. Subscription Model - APhA’s Pharmacy Library • Professor Wendy Mobley-Buckstein and June Johnson – Phar 169 “Self Care & Non-Prescription Course” • Handbook of Nonprescription Drugs: An Interactive Approach to Self-Care
  • 50. Subscription Model - APhA’s Pharmacy Library
  • 51. Subscription Model - APhA’s Pharmacy Library
  • 52. APhA’s Pharmacy Library Usage •Handbook of Nonprescription Drugs • Jan - Jun 2014: 38,271 views
  • 53. Examples • No DRM • Springer • Epub • Ebsco ebooks • Ingram Coutts • Subscription Model • APhA’s Pharmacy Library
  • 54. ACADEMIC COMMUNITY RESPONSES (EXAMPLES) & FUTURE DIRECTIONS TERI KOCH COLLECTION DEVELOPMENT LIBRARIAN
  • 55. Academic Community Responses to escalating textbook costs •Development of Open Textbooks usually with institutional and/or grant support •What is an “Open Textbook”: books that are freely available using some version of an open copyright license (such as “Creative Commons”). Many allow for modification of content to suit instructor’s needs.
  • 56. OPEN TEXTBOOK INITIATIVES Two examples
  • 57. Open SUNY textbooks • Open SUNY textbooks: http://opensuny.org/omp/index.php/SUNYOpenTextbooks/catalog • Open SUNY Textbooks is an open access textbook publishing initiative established by State University of New York libraries and supported by SUNY Innovative Instruction Technology Grants. This pilot initiative publishes high- quality, cost-effective course resources by engaging faculty as authors and peer-reviewers, and libraries as publishing service and infrastructure. (description from web site) • Characteristics: • Have already published 22 free online textbooks with more planned. • Had over 15,000 users for 2013-2014
  • 58. Open SUNY continued • Cost savings example for two classes in Spring 2014: Title # Students Savings @ avg. cost $83.59 YBP Natural Resources Biometrics 41 $3,427 User's Guide to Planet Earth 144 $12,037
  • 59. Open SUNY
  • 60. Open Stax • http://openstaxcollege.org/ • Open Stax College: Offers • 7 peer-reviewed open-source textbooks online for free (5 more by end of 2014) • print prices start at $30. Based at Rice University and funded by major foundations (Gates & Hewlett foundations) • eventual goal is to create textbooks for 25 of the most-attended college courses in the U.S. • OpenStax College print titles are currently in more than 3,000 college stores • Partial list of colleges/universities who have used Open Stax books: --Arizona State, Arkansas State, Auburn, Ball State, Baylor, Bryn Mawr College, Florida State, Indiana State, Rice, etc.
  • 61. OpenStax College: Peer-reviewed open source eTextbooks
  • 62. UNC-Charlotte library project – Case Study: Promoting eBook collections for course adoption •UNC-Charlotte Library “E-textbooks at Atkins Library” FAQ page: http://library.uncc.edu/et/faq.php •Developed a database of both already owned eBook titles, and titles they would agree to purchase for faculty to adopt for course “textbooks” or assigned readings
  • 63. UNC-Charlotte library project – Case Study: Promoting eBook collections for course adoption (cont’d): Criteria employed for project “The database is a compilation of eBooks that the library owns or can purchase for our eBook collection to support your classes (at no additional cost to the students). All titles in this database are or can be made available to the entire campus with unlimited simultaneous users, without Digital Rights Management (DRM) or proprietary software” Note: they also only include eBooks for course adoption that, when purchased, would be available in perpetuity.
  • 64. UNC-Charlotte Project to make eBooks available as course adopted content: • Publishers included in project (titles not already owned, but loaded into database for discovery & eventual purchase if requested): • Taylor & Francis • Wiley • Cambridge University Press • ABC-Clio • Elsevier • Oxford University Press • *Plus they included titles in this database previously purchased in packages that met the base requirements (unlimited users, no DRM, perpetual access).
  • 65. E-Textbooks at UNC Charlotte: FAQ
  • 66. Database of eBook titles that could be adopted for courses: http://library.uncc.edu/etextbooks/search
  • 67. eBooks actually adopted as course texts: https://library.uncc.edu/etextbooks/
  • 68. Example of Syllabus using eBooks from the library database (usedwithpermission):
  • 69. Summary of UNC-Charlotte case study • Project began in August 2013 • Work in cooperation with Campus Bookstore. They are not competing since most traditional textbooks are not currently available either in an electronic format, or do not fit the stipulated criteria for inclusion in the database (unlimited users, No DRM, Perpetual access) • Favorable campus reception • Costs: For the Spring semester 2014 they spent $4482/32 titles. • Next steps: exploring making “traditional” textbooks available, exploring how to make “Open Source” content more available (one-stop shopping)
  • 70. Cowles is considering developing a similar database for faculty •Thoughts? We’ll be coming back for questions shortly!
  • 71. How can I get involved?
  • 72. What can the Library do to help you adopt alternatives? • 1. Tutorial on how to embed Library material in BlackBoard: • https://library.drake.edu/get-help/services-for-faculty/blackboard- integration/
  • 73. How to Embed library resources
  • 74. How to use SuperSearch to embed materials in BB: • http://researchguides.drake.edu/bb-tools • Step-by-step instructions on using SuperSearch to capture and link Library resources.
  • 75. An entire set of Web pages • http://researchguides.drake.edu/textbooks
  • 76. A call to alternatives? • Repeat: Drake has no current contractual arrangements that would preclude any instructor from adapting a “non-traditional” approach to textbooks!
  • 77. A call to alternatives? • So, see: http://www.studentpirgs.org/open-textbooks/faculty-statement?id=wi • Open Textbooks Statement of Intent As faculty members, we affirm that it is our prerogative and responsibility to select course materials that are pedagogically most appropriate for our classes. We also affirm that it is consistent with this principle to seek affordable and accessible course materials for our classes whenever possible. This includes "open textbooks," which are offered online to students at no cost.
  • 78. Q and A! • Reactions? • Thoughts? • Comments? • Questions?