CHECK Conference 2011

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Front line services at the University of Kansas and Kansas State University have evolved over the last few years to include knowledge management and improved incident management processes. The panel will share insights on integrating the capture, structure and reuse of knowledge and rethinking the incident management process to improve service effectiveness. The challenges of implementing both processes, lessons learned and the way forward will be presented.
To download or for more information please refer to http://check.ku.edu/presentations/index.shtml

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  • Impetus – Improved communication, # of listservs (n=150); 3 of systems to monitor incidents; Remedy contract was about to expire; structure of Remedy was siloed Process to rethink – 18 months; task force; all facets of ITS; rethink the current process for managing incidents and to envision the process for incidents; then consider reality
  • Are there reports that you can share? Do you have any cost or ROI data? What metrics are you analyzing? How do you use these data to improve front line services?
  • Are there reports that you can share? Do you have any cost or ROI data? What metrics are you analyzing? How do you use these data to improve front line services?
  • Are there reports that you can share? Do you have any cost or ROI data? What metrics are you analyzing? How do you use these data to improve front line services?
  • KU primary speaker; K-State offer comments
  • KU primary speaker; K-State offer comments What process did you use to rethink knowledge management? Why was that important to supporting the end users?
  • HDI compiled the top 10 reasons to implement knowledge management. Here at KU we needed to pay particular attention to our level of service in terms of providing consistent answers, providing first- contact resolution and providing “tier 0” self-help. Additionally, our first tier support is staffed predominantly by students, so reducing training time was also a consideration.
  • Here are some of the benefits of knowledge management as reported by the consortium for service innovation.
  • KU primary speaker; K-State offer comments
  • Are there reports that you can share? Do you have any cost or ROI data? What metrics are you analyzing? How do you use these data to improve front line services?
  • In January, we made a concentrated effort to link our KB articles to our web content. You can see how this increased the views.
  • Are there lessons learned from implementing incident management? Are there lessons learned from implementing knowledge management? Can you share any future directions on the use of the tool? For those universities that are interested in looking at front line services, how would you suggest that they begin?
  • What resources would you share with individuals who are evaluating similar services?
  • Are there any additional comments that you would like to share?
  • CHECK Conference 2011

    1. 1. Presented by:Heather CoffmanTraci FullertonUniversity of Kansas Improving Services: Lessons from the Front LineEric DoverRebecca Gould CompanyKansas State University CHECK 2011 LOGO The University of Kansas
    2. 2.  Agenda  Anecdotes  Definitions  Incident Management  Knowledge Management  Lessons Learned  Questions
    3. 3. Anecdotes
    4. 4. From the listserv... 08:42 CTS contacted XXX. 08:46 CTS contacted XXX and explained the situation to him. He said he will look at it and call XXX back directly. 08:48 CTS called XXX back to let him know that XXX was working on the problem and would be giving him a call. 08:53 XXX called back and asked CTS-D to call CTS-L. 08:56 CST-D contacted XXX from CTS-L at his office and left a message. 08:58 CST-D contacted XXX on his cell and left a message. 09:03 CTS-D contacted XXX from CTS. He said that he could not get in the server and asked CTS-D staff to restart the server (it’s a XXX server) 09:17 CTS-D called XXX. to ask questions because the server could not be found as it has no label. 09:19 CTS-D called XXX and left a message. 09:28 XXX called CTS-D back and said to keep looking for the label on the server. CTS-D checked every XXX server we could find. None have an XXX label that we could find.
    5. 5. Continues... 09:35 CTS-DCO called XXX back and said they could not find a XXX server with an XXX label. XXX said that XXX would be in within 30 minutes to point out the XXX server and restart it. At that time CTS-D will re-label the server to avoid this issue in the future. 09:53 XXX from CTS-L called and said he would be in to resolve the issue shortly. 09:59 CTS called XXX back to let him know the problem is being worked on. 10:10 XXX from CTS came in to restart the server. CTS made a new label for this time. 10:15 CTS contacted XXX to make sure everything was working for him and it was.
    6. 6. Improving Services: Lessons from the Front LineThe basics:What is Incident Management?What is Knowledge Management?
    7. 7. Improving Services: Lessons from the Front Line The objective of Incident Management - restore normal operations as quickly as possible with the least possible impact oneither the business or the user, at a cost-effective price.
    8. 8. Improving Services: Lessons from the Front Line Incident Management What was the impetus for rethinking incident? What process did you use to rethink how you would handle incidents?
    9. 9. Demonstration
    10. 10. Improving Services: Lessons from the Front LineReporting & Return on Investment Trend Reporting Total number of incidents tickets created over a six month period by the hour that they were created.
    11. 11. Improving Services: Lessons from the Front LineReporting & Return on Investment Trend Reporting Total number of incidents tickets created over a six month period by the days of the week.
    12. 12. Improving Services: Lessons from the Front LineReporting & Return on Investment
    13. 13. Improving Services: Lessons from the Front Line What is Knowledge Management?Knowledge management is finding, organizing, and managing the knowledge, expertise, and pastexperiences of the people within an organization.
    14. 14. Improving Services: Lessons from the Front LineKnowledge ManagementWhy think about Knowledge Management?
    15. 15. Improving Services: Lessons from the Front LineTop 10 Reasons to Implement Knowledge Management:10. Respond and resolve problems faster.9. Provide answers to complex problems.8. Provide consistent answers to customer’s questions.7. Address support analyst burnout.6. Address the lack of time for training.5. Answering recurring questions.4. Identify opportunities to learn from customer’s experiences.3. Improve First Contact Resolution.2. Enable Web based self-help.12. Lower support costs. Source: HDI
    16. 16. Improving Services: Lessons from the Front LineBenefits:Operational efficiency  Improved time to resolve 30% - 60%  Increased support capacity 22% - >100%  Improved time to proficiency months to weeks  Efficient creation of content to enable web self-help  Identification/elimination of root causesIncreased job satisfaction  Less redundant work  More confidence  Reduced training timeIncreased customer satisfaction Source: HDI
    17. 17. Improving Services: Lessons from the Front LineThe “old” way:  Dedicated knowledge management team  Content created in preparation of demand  Knowledge is verified, validated, and published  Knowledge is an optional resource  Knowledge is someone else’s responsibilityKnown as Knowledge Engineering  Follows a manufacturing process Source: HDI
    18. 18. Improving Services: Lessons from the Front LineThe new way:  Create content as a by-product of solving problems  Evolve content based on demand and usage  Develop a KB of our collective experience to-date  Reward learning, collaboration, sharing and improving Simple premise: To capture, structure, and re-use support knowledgeKnown as Knowledge-Centered Support (KCS)  Developed by the Consortium for Service Innovation  Promoted by HDI in 2003  Compliments and enhances ITIL Source: HDI
    19. 19. Improving Services: Lessons from the Front LineHow do Incident and Knowledge interact? Create Incident No Research or Search KB Solution Found? Escalate Yes Solve It Yes Solution Correct? No USE IT FLAG IT / FIX IT ADD IT Close Incident
    20. 20. User/Customer experience • User self service • Notifications • Feedback mechanisms
    21. 21. Improving Services: Lessons from the Front Line
    22. 22. Improving Services: Lessons from the Front LineReporting & Return on Investment
    23. 23. Improving Services: Lessons from the Front LineReporting & Return on Investment Q/A and Continual Improvement Reporting • Content effectiveness • ROI • Solution Summary
    24. 24. Improving Services: Lessons from the Front Line Content Effectiveness
    25. 25. Improving Services: Lessons from the Front Line
    26. 26. Improving Services: Lessons from the Front Line Return On Investment
    27. 27. Improving Services: Lessons from the Front Line Solution Summary
    28. 28. Improving Services: Lessons from the Front LineLessons Learned
    29. 29. Improving Services: Lessons from the Front Line8 critical knowledge management best practices:3.Capture Knowledge as a byproduct of the problem solving process4.Structure the knowledge to maximize reuse and eliminate rework5.Searching for knowledge results in enhanced and new knowledge.6.Just-in-time solution quality has higher return on investment than just-in-case knowledgeengineering7.Support Center technology must enable the problem solving process.8.The quality requirements for knowledge must be defined based on the Good Enough Test.9.Performance Assessment provides feedback to enhance products, processes, and people.10.Leaders must deliver organizational change management for knowledge management tosucceed. Source: HDI
    30. 30. Improving Services: Lessons from the Front Line Resources Gliedman, C. (June 28, 2005). 31 Best Practices for the Service DeskMagic Quadrant for the IT Service Desk, 2007, Gartner RAS Core Research Note, G00150504, David Coyle Consortium for Service Innovation: www.serviceinnovation.orgHDI: http://www.thinkhdi.com/certification/knowledgecenteredsupport.asp http://community.service-now.com/blog/wallymarx/5998
    31. 31. Improving Services: Lessons from the Front Line Questions
    32. 32. Improving Services: Lessons from the Front LineContact information:University of KansasHeather Coffman Thank you!hcoffman@ku.eduTraci Fullertontracibf@ku.eduKansas State UniversityEric Doveredover@ksu.eduRebecca Gouldragou@ksu.edu

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