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Technology, Teaching and Learning: From the Frontline
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Technology, Teaching and Learning: From the Frontline

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Presentation Description: How does technology change the way we teach? The way students learn? Can technology really make a difference? These questions will be used to start our exploration of the ...

Presentation Description: How does technology change the way we teach? The way students learn? Can technology really make a difference? These questions will be used to start our exploration of the research and best practices. If you are involved in teaching and learning, and are curious about integrating technology effectively, this session will equip you with sound strategies you can implement now.

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  • 06/05/09 CIT-S-141-2008, DAVID M PETER, Vincennes University

Technology, Teaching and Learning: From the Frontline Technology, Teaching and Learning: From the Frontline Presentation Transcript

  • Session Information S-141
    • Key Presenter: David Peter, Director, CTL Vincennes University
    • Session Format: Forum
    • Session Title: Technology, Teaching, and Learning From the Frontline
    • Track: Teaching and Learning
    • Date and Time: Sunday, Oct 19, 2008 (8:30 AM - 9:30 AM)
    • Scheduled Location: 150 C, Lower Level
    • How does technology change the way we teach and the way students learn? Can technology really make a difference? These questions are used to start our exploration of the research around best practices. If you are involved in teaching and learning and are curious about integrating technology effectively, this session equips you with sound strategies you can implement immediately.
  • Technology, Teaching and Learning: From the Frontline David Peter, Director Center for Teaching and Learning Vincennes University
  • Before we begin …
    • Gutenberg press circa 1440
    • First audio recording, T. Edison 1870
    • Mimeograph machine patented by T. Edison August 8, 1876
    • Internet, DARPA started in the 1960’s
    • Apple .April 1, 1976
    • Microsoft WINDOWS .November 1985
    • MOSAIC browser, 1991
  • Starting question(s)
  • Guiding questions
    • How does technology change the way we teach?
    • How does technology change the way students learn?
    • Can technology really make a difference?
  • How does technology change the way we teach?
  • Profile of "new" environment
    • Flexible, Mobile, Versatile - a change in environments, technology changed, students changed, role of education changed
    • Learning space concept – learner, learning focused – social in structure, collaborative.
    • Evolution and development of technology – natural growth and expansion of technology, whether result of business, industry, or education.
  • Flexible, Mobile, Versatile
    • Learning space - The term classroom implied a certain structure, physical structure, and certain expectations about the type of acceptable activities. These spaces are now for learning, hence learning space.
    • Learning commons - A learning commons is a larger space, a larger and more expansive learning space.
  • GOOD Learning Space
    • Intuitive
    • Learning-focused (or Learner-focused)
    • Unstructured
    • Multipurpose
    • Flexible
    • ALWAYS USED
  • The “New(er)” Technologies
  • OLD vs. NEW
    • OLD Technologies
    • Chalk board, erasers
    • Spiral binders
    • Index or note cards
    • 16mm movies
    • Slide projectors
    • New(er) Technologies
    • Touch screen monitors
    • Electronic paper
    • “ Flash” cards
    • Video on demand
    • “ Slide shows”
  • Evolution of Technology
    • Digital - Digital native – technology is seen as natural part or extension of life, and life’s activities
    • Analog - Digital immigrant – technology is viewed as an extension or supplement to society, use may be determined by context
  • Digital and Analog
    • Digital is two way
    • Digital is mobile
    • Digital is powerful
    • Digital is portable
    • Digital is flexible
    • Analog is one way
    • Analog is stationary
    • Analog is powerful
    • Analog may be portable
    • Analog may be flexible
  • What is teaching technology?
    • Is teaching technology ubiquitous, pervasive, and transparent?
    • What are the expectations for this technology?
  • Ubiquitous, Pervasive, Transparent
  • Everywhere, Somewhere or Nowhere
    • Is technology ubiquitous? Is it everywhere?
    • Is technology everywhere? Do I find technology pervading EVERY part of my environment?
    • Have the lines between technology blurred?
  • Teaching and Technology
    • Are there different "types" of technology for teaching? Instructional, Informational, Educational
    • Role of technology in teaching –
      • as instructional innovation,
      • as social innovation
      • or adoption/adaptation
  • Styles and Technology
  • Teaching Styles and Technology
    • Teaching versus Instruction
      • Technology as the medium
      • Technology as the message
    • Process (Teaching/Learning) versus Product (Test score, assignment)
      • Technology may help/improve … recall
      • Technology may help/improve … retention
      • Technology may help/improve … transfer
  • Today
    • More media-rich and media-centric content is available today
    • Technology has the POTENTIAL to make the act/art/science of teaching RICHER and more ENGAGING for students
  • How does technology change the way students learn?
  • Learning and Technology
    • Can technology help all students learn equally?
    • Does the use of technology require students to be technologically literate? digitally literate?
  • Evolution of Technology
    • Digital - Digital native – technology is seen as natural part or extension of life, and life’s activities
    • Analog - Digital immigrant – technology is viewed as an extension or supplement to society, use may be determined by context
  • Role of technology in learning
    • Engagement
    • Promote active learning
    • Mobile
    • Emulates or models “real” life
    • Multi-modal
    • Ubiquitous
    • Pervasive
    • Transparent
  • New Students, New Technology
  • What students want …
    • Focus
    • Direction
    • Clarity
    • Multi-sensory stimulation
    • Sense of challenge and accomplishment
  • Learning styles
    • Multi-tasking
    • Multimedia rich
    • Focused, just-in-time
    • Social – local, and extended
    • Collaborative
    • Networked, connected
    • Mobile, nomadic
  • Can technology really make a difference?
  • Can technology really make a difference?
    • Matching technology to teaching and learning styles
    • Incidental or qualitative differences
    • Impact measured by student or learner perceptions
  • We have NO choice … students expect technology to be used in the classroom, in learning … it is a PREREQUISITE to learning … it can be used to GAIN and MAINTAIN attention
  • Guiding questions
    • How does technology change the way we teach?
    • How does technology change the way students learn?
    • Can technology really make a difference?
  • Take away points
    • Social technologies
      • Create, develop, and sustain communities
    • Networking technologies
      • Provide connections to shared interests
    • Collaborative technologies
      • Provide platform for shared space, creating focused deliverables
    • Transparent technologies
      • No interference in daily “NORMAL” life
  • Take away points on …
    • Social technologies
      • Create, develop, and sustain communities
      • Allow faculty to connect with students in and OUT of class
      • Provide students opportunities to feel a PART of class
  • Take away points on …
    • Networking technologies
      • Provide connections to shared interests
      • Provide ACCESS to resources
      • Open up more resources
      • For faculty, provide a RICHER teaching opportunity
      • For students, provide greater access, resources for learning
  • Take away points on …
    • Collaborative technologies
      • Provide platform for shared space, creating focused deliverables
      • Provide “REAL WORLD” exposure to collaboration, group dynamics, and team dynamics
      • For faculty, provide broader, and deeper teaching opportunities
      • For students, provide growth opportunities, exposure to diverse viewpoints
  • Take away points on …
    • Transparent technologies
      • No interference in daily “NORMAL” life
      • No need to “relearn” or “learn” new technologies
      • Enhance the fluid connections between teaching, learning, life
      • For faculty, increase teaching locations and opportunities
      • For students, provide commonality between life and learning
  • Next Steps
  • First Things First
    • The key mission – teaching and learning
    • Old ways may NOT be the best ways
    • Change is good AND necessary
    • Find INNOVATORS for technology
    • SUSTAIN SUPPORT
  • Concluding Thoughts
    • Today’s (and tomorrow’s) students are more comfortable and confident with technology – CAPITALIZE ON THIS
    • Yesterday’s faculty MAY not be aware of technological opportunities
    • WE must find ways to use, integrate, adapt, adopt technology, effectively, efficiently and instructionally
  • David Peter, Director Center for Teaching and Learning Vincennes University Email: [email_address] Phone: 812-888-5815 URL: www.vinu.edu/ctl