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Understanding Your Communication Style

Understanding Your Communication Style

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BA 15 Chapter 3 Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Chapter Three Understanding Your Communication Style
  • 2. Chapter Preview: Understanding Your Communication Style
    • Style bias and its effect on interpersonal relations
    • Benefits of understanding communication styles
    • Elements of communication style model
    • Identifying preferred style
    • Style flexing
  • 3. Communication Style
    • Communication style—patterns of behavior that others can observe
    • Understanding your style….
      • achieve greater self-awareness
      • develop more effective interpersonal relations
      • greater sensitivity to and tolerance for others’ styles
      • essential for managing key relationships
      • self others member of a group
  • 4. Fundamental Concepts
    • Individual differences exist and are important
      • i.e., gestures, assertiveness, expression
      • each person has unique style
      • identify by careful observation
    • Differences tend to be stable
      • Jung’s Psychological Types
      • born with disposition that is exercised and developed over least preferred preferences
  • 5. Fundamental Concepts
    • Four basic styles
      • Intuitor, thinker, feeler, and sensor
      • Similar characteristics within style
    • Style is a way of thinking and behaving
      • Not an ability
      • Is a preferred way of using abilities or style
  • 6. Fundamental Concepts
    • Productive relationships are developed by being in sync with others
      • Important advantage when understanding others’
      • Adapting is style flexing
  • 7. Communication Style Bias
    • A common form of prejudice
    • More likely when styles differ
    • What can you do?
      • Develop an awareness of your own style
      • Learn to assess the style of others
      • Learn to adapt your own style to theirs
      • “Speaking the other person’s language” is essential for relationship skills
  • 8. Total Person Insight
    • Everyone has had the experience of saying or doing something that was perfectly acceptable to a friend or coworker and then being surprised when the same behavior irritated someone else.
    • David W. Merrill and Roger H. Reid
    • Personal Styles and Effective Performance
  • 9. Communication Style Model
    • Two important dimensions of style:
      • Dominance
      • Sociability
    • Dominance
      • The tendency to display a “take-charge” attitude
      • an important dimension in interpersonal relationships
    • Everyone falls somewhere on the dominance continuum
  • 10. The Dominance Continuum
    • • more cooperative • give advice freely
    • • eager to assist others • initiate demands
    • • less assertive • more assertive
    • • more willingly controlled • seek control
    Figure 3.1 Dominance Continuum
  • 11. Determining Your Preferred Style
    • Identify yourself on the dominance continuum
    • Ask four or five people who know you well to identify you on the continuum
    • No best place to be
    • Successful people can be found on all points
    • Both ends are necessary and important at times
  • 12. Figure 3.2 Dominance Indicator Form
  • 13. Figure 3.2 Dominance Indicator Form (continued)
  • 14. Figure 3.2 Dominance Indicator Form (continued)
  • 15. Flexibility Is Important
    • Low on dominance
      • more assertive temporarily to achieve an objective
      • learn to be responsive without giving up convictions
    • High on dominance
      • curb strong opinions and limit demands to establish cooperative relationships
  • 16. The Sociability Continuum
    • Sociability is a tendency to seek and enjoy social relationships
      • measures if you control or express feelings
    • Determining your preferred style
      • Identify yourself on the dominance continuum
      • Identify yourself on the sociability continuum
      • Ask four or five people who know you well to identify you on the continua
  • 17. Figure 3.3 - Sociability Continuum Source: Gerald L Manning and Barry Reece, Selling Today: Creating Customer Value, Ninth Edition, Copyright © 2004. Adapted by permission of Prentice-HallInc., Upper Saddle River, NJ. • expresses feelings • open and talkative • enjoys personal associations • controls feelings • more reserved and formal in relationships
  • 18. Figure 3.4 - Sociability Indicator Form
  • 19. Figure 3.4 - Sociability Indicator Form (continued)
  • 20. Figure 3.4 - Sociability Indicator Form (continued) Source: Gerald L Manning and Barry Reece, Selling Today: Creating Customer Value, Ninth Edition, Copyright © 2004. Adapted by permission of Prentice-Hall Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ
  • 21. Where Should You Be?
    • No best place to be
    • Successful people are everywhere along the sociability continuum
    • Flexibility is important
    • Low sociability
      • may need to be more expressive to avoid perception of indifference or unconcerned
    • High sociability
      • may need to curb exuberance if more formal environment is required
  • 22. Communication Styles Model
    • The model represents four communication styles:
      • emotive director
      • reflective supportive
    • Two factors:
      • dominance sociability
    • Model will help identify your most preferred style
  • 23. Figure 3.5 - When the dominance and sociability dimensions are combined, the framework for communication style classification is established. Source: Gerald L Manning and Barry Reece, Selling Today: Creating Customer Value, Ninth Edition, Copyright © 2004. Adapted by permission of Prentice-Hall Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ.
  • 24. Figure 3.6 - The emotive style combines high sociability and high dominance. Source: Gerald L Manning and Barry Reece, Selling Today: Creating Customer Value, Ninth Edition, Copyright © 2004. Adapted by permission of Prentice-Hall Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ.
  • 25. Emotive Style
    • Displays spontaneous, uninhibited behavior
    • Displays the personality dimension described as extroversion
    • Possesses a natural persuasiveness
  • 26. Figure 3.7 - The director style combines high dominance and low sociability. Source: Gerald L Manning and Barry Reece, Selling Today: Creating Customer Value, Ninth Edition, Copyright © 2004. Adapted by permission of Prentice-Hall Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ.
  • 27. Director Style
    • Projects a serious attitude
    • Expresses strong opinions
    • May project indifference
  • 28. Figure 3.8 - The reflective style combines low dominance and low sociability. Source: Gerald L Manning and Barry Reece, Selling Today: Creating Customer Value, Ninth Edition, Copyright © 2004. Adapted by permission of Prentice-Hall Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ.
  • 29. Reflective Style
    • Expresses opinions in a formal, deliberate manner
    • Seems preoccupied
    • Prefers orderliness
  • 30. Figure 3.9 - The supportive style combines low dominance and high sociability. Source: Gerald L Manning and Barry Reece, Selling Today: Creating Customer Value, Ninth Edition, Copyright © 2004. Adapted by permission of Prentice-Hall Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ.
  • 31. Supportive Style
    • Listens attentively
    • Avoids the use of power
    • Makes and expresses decisions in a thoughtful, deliberate manner
  • 32. Identify Yourself?
    • Nobody conforms completely to one style
    • Only one dimension of a personality
    • Only deals with behaviors that others can observe
    • May be able to identify the style least like yourself
  • 33. Variation Within Your Communication Style
    • Preferred styles vary in intensity
    • Zones radiate outward from the center
    • These dimensions are intensity zones
    • Boundary between zones are not a permanent barrier
    • People use "style flexing"
  • 34. Figure 3.10 - Communication Style Intensity Zones Source: Gerald L Manning and Barry Reece, Selling Today: Creating Customer Value, Ninth Edition, Copyright © 2004. Adapted by permission of Prentice-Hall Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ.
  • 35. Variation Within Your Communication Style
    • Zone I
      • Display behaviors with less intensity
      • May be difficult to identify the style
      • Not be as obvious in their gestures, tone of voice, speech patterns, or emotional expressions
    • Zone 2
      • Display behaviors with greater intensity
      • Can sometimes observe behavior change when upset or angry
  • 36. Variation Within Your Communication Style
    • Excess Zone
      • Characterized by intensity and rigidity
      • Can also be labeled the "danger" zone
      • Often inflexible and lacks versatility
    • Extreme intensity in any quadrant can interfere with good human relations
    • People may move into the excess zone when stressed, threatened, or insecure
  • 37. Table 3.1 - Behaviors Displayed in the Excess Zone
  • 38. Tips on Style Identification of Others
    • Focus on observable behavior
      • The best clues are nonverbal:
        • Gestures, posture, facial expressions, and speech patterns
    • Determine where the person falls on the sociability and dominance continuums
      • This is a process, do not rush to identify
      • Different situations will bring out different behaviors
  • 39. Versatility: The Third Dimension
    • Versatility means acting in ways that gain a social endorsement
      • Makes others feel comfortable
      • Is independent of style
    • Style flexing
      • Deliberate attempt to change or alter style to meet the needs of another person
      • Temporary effort to act in harmony with other communication styles
  • 40. Total Person Insight
    • The best way to break a habit is to establish another habit. For example, if you’re a constant talker, stop talking. Work at it.
    • Kimberly Alyn and Bob Phillips
    • Authors, Annoying People
  • 41. Strategies for Adapting Your Style
    • Identify the style of the other person
    • Think of ways to flex your style to gain a social endorsement
    • Several style adaptation strategies
  • 42. Flexing to an Emotive Style
    • Take time to build a social as well as a business relationship
    • Display interest in a person’s ideas, interests, and experiences
    • Do not place too much emphasis on details
    • Maintain a fast and spontaneous pace
  • 43. Flexing to a Director Style
    • Be specific, brief, and to the point
    • Present the facts logically and be prepared to provide specific answers
    • Maintain fast and decisive pace
    • Project strength and confidence
    • Messages should be short and to the point
  • 44. Flexing to a Reflective Style
    • Be well organized
    • Be straightforward and direct
    • Be accurate and realistic when presenting information
    • Messages should be detailed and precise
    • Speak slowly and systematically
  • 45. Flexing to a Supportive Style
    • Show a sincere interest
    • Identify areas of common interests
    • Draw out other’s personal goals and views
    • Listen and be responsive
    • Do not be pushy
    • Put priority on relationship building
  • 46. Style Flexing: Pitfalls and Possibilities
    • If sincere and honest, style flexing can:
      • help build constructive relationships
      • be a valuable, productive strategy
      • be especially critical when something important is at stake
    • Do not label others
      • classify strengths and preferences, not people
    • Do not let your own label become rigid
  • 47. Strength/Weakness Paradox
    • There is no best communication style
      • each has unique strong points
    • People have problems when they overextend the strengths of their style
    • Customizing your style can require learning to overcome your strengths
  • 48. Chapter Review
    • Style bias and its effect on interpersonal relations
      • Communication styles are patterns of behaviors that are observable to others
      • Way of responding to people and events
      • Bias is likely to surface when someone's style is distinctly different from your own
  • 49. Chapter Review
    • Benefits of understanding communication styles
      • Knowing your style will help you achieve greater self-awareness and develop more effective interpersonal relations with others
      • Accurate self-knowledge is the starting point for effectiveness at work
  • 50. Chapter Review Summary
    • The communication style model is formed by two dimensions dominance and sociability
    • Four communication Styles
      • Emotive
      • Director
      • Reflective
      • Supportive
  • 51. Chapter Review Summary
    • Identifying your preferred style
      • Rate yourself on each scale (dominance and sociability)
      • Ask others to complete these forms for you
    • Style flexing
      • A third dimension—versatility
      • You can adjust your own style to others
      • Keep an open mind about others
      • Don’t typecast or judge