Introduction To Restorative Approaches In Organisations
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Introduction To Restorative Approaches In Organisations

on

  • 1,394 views

Restorative Approaches inspired by the philosophy and practices of restorative justice , which puts repairing harm done to relationships and people over and above the need for assigning blame and ...

Restorative Approaches inspired by the philosophy and practices of restorative justice , which puts repairing harm done to relationships and people over and above the need for assigning blame and dispensing punishment.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,394
Views on SlideShare
1,394
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
3
Downloads
63
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Introduction To Restorative Approaches In Organisations Introduction To Restorative Approaches In Organisations Presentation Transcript

  • Introduction to Restorative Approaches
  • Where does the approach come from?
    • Canada 1974
    • US and UK 1980’s
    • New Zealand 1980’s
    • Australia 1990’s
    • UK again mid 1990’s
  • What is Restorative Justice?
    • A commitment to:
    • Facilitating dialogue between all those affected by the wrongdoing or conflict
    • Encouraging those responsible for the harm to become accountable for their actions and responsible for putting right the wrong
    • Ensuring that all those involved or affected are given the opportunity to share their story, their feelings and their needs
    • Involving everyone affected in finding mutually acceptable ways forward
    • Repairing the harm caused by any behaviour that has a negative impact on others
    • Repairing, or at times building, relationships between those affected
    • A restorative approach is all about relationships – making, maintaining and, when necessary, repairing relationships
  • Skills Values Interaction with others
  • The values that underpin a commitment to building, maintaining & repairing relationships Mutual respect, empowerment, collaboration, valuing others, integrity, honesty, openness, trust, tolerance
  • The skills that underpin a commitment to building, maintaining & repairing relationships Emotional articulacy, empathy, open-mindedness, active non-judgemental listening, conflict management skills Mutual respect, empowerment, collaboration, valuing others, integrity, honesty, openness, trust, tolerance
  • Emotional articulacy, empathy, open-mindedness, active non-judgemental listening, conflict management skills Mutual respect, empowerment, collaboration, valuing others, integrity, honesty, openness, trust, tolerance Interaction with others
  • When dealing with wrongdoing or conflict, is your response informed by relationship values and skills?
    • Do you invite people to give you, individually, their perspective on what has happened?
    • Are you genuinely curious about their thoughts and feelings at the time of the incident and since?
    • Do you invite them to consider who else may have been affected?
    • Do you invite them to consider what needs to happen to put matters right?
    • Do you ask them what their own personal needs are for closure and repair?
  • Do you manage to refrain from :
    • Using your body or your tone to show disapproval?
    • Giving your own opinion or judgement about what has happened?
    • Taking sides?
    • Assuming you know what has happened and why?
    • Telling people what they should do?
    • Offering unasked for advice?
    • Insisting people apologise and make up?
  • The Traditional Approach
    • What’s happened?
    • Who started it?
    • What response is appropriate to deter and punish?
  • The Restorative Approach
    • What’s happened?
    • Who has been affected or harmed?
    • How can those involved be supported in finding ways to repair the harm caused?
    • What do I need when I’ve been harmed?
    • An apology
    • An empathetic listener
    • Amends made
    • The other person to understand what has upset me
    • To be respected
    • To be allowed to have emotion
    • Support and positive reinforcement
    • Reassurance it won’t happen again
    • To draw a line underneath it
      • What do I need when I have harmed
      • someone else?
    • To apologise
    • Someone to talk to
    • Time to put things right
    • To make it up to them
    • A chance to explain to other person and myself
    • To feel better about it
    • and about myself
    • To be forgiven
    • To reassure them/myself it won’t happen again
    • To get back on friendly terms
    • What do I need when I’ve been harmed?
    • An apology
    • An empathetic listener
    • Amends made
    • The other person to understand what has upset me
    • To be respected
    • To be allowed to have emotion
    • Support and positive reinforcement
    • Reassurance it won’t happen again
    • To draw a line underneath it
    • What do I need when I’ve harmed someone else?
    • To apologise
    • Someone to talk to
    • Time to put things right
    • To make it up to them
    • A chance to explain to other person and myself
    • To feel better about it
    • and about myself
    • To be forgiven
    • To reassure them/myself it won’t happen again
    • To get back on friendly terms
  • The Five Magic Questions
    • What happened?
    • What were you thinking?
    • How were you feeling?
    • Who else has been affected by this?
    • What do you need, and what needs to happen now, so that the harm can be repaired ?
  • The Restorative Mindset
  • The Restorative Chat
  • Mediation
  • Informal group mediation/conference
  • Formal restorative conference
  • Circles – Circle time; classroom conferences; Staff problem-solving circles; parent circles etc
  • The restorative challenge
    • to address conflicts and harmful situations in a way that, at the very least, does not harm relationships, and at best builds and repairs them
    • to empower those involved in conflict or harmful situations to take ownership of these and find ways forward for themselves
    • What opportunities do you have for making your work with your clients/customers more restorative?
    • What opportunities do you have for making your working environment more restorative?
  • Degrees of restorativeness 4 0 3 2 1 -1 BEING RESISTANT IGNORANT INTERESTED ENCOURAGING OTHERS DOING
  • Levels of personal restorativeness -1 0 1 2 3 4 Rejects restorative justice/approaches – for ideological or practical reasons RESISTANT Unaware of restorative justice/approaches IGNORANT Aware of restorative justice/approaches and open to their potential INTERESTED Aware of restorative approaches – makes referrals to others but not personally involved ENCOURAGING OTHERS Using restorative approaches only when an incident occurs (reactive) DOING Personal and professional life informed by restorative principles (proactive) BEING
  • Levels of school/organisational restorativeness -1 0 1 2 3 4 Rejects restorative approaches – for ideological or practical reasons RESISTANT Unaware of restorative justice/approaches IGNORANT Aware of restorative approaches and open to their potential INTERESTED Aware of restorative approaches – makes referrals to outside agencies ENCOURAGING OTHERS Using restorative approaches only when an incident occurs (reactive) DOING School/Organisation informed by restorative principles (proactive policies, procedures,) BEING
  • Levels of community/district/local authority restorativeness -1 0 1 2 3 4 Rejects restorative approaches – for ideological or practical reasons RESISTANT Unaware of restorative justice/approaches IGNORANT Aware of restorative approaches and open to their potential INTERESTED Pockets of practice–some agencies and schools using restorative approaches ENCOURAGING OTHERS District/local authority using restorative approaches only when an incident occurs (reactive) DOING District/local authority informed by restorative principles (proactive policies, procedures,) BEING
    • Transforming Conflict
    • National Centre for Restorative
    • Justice in Youth Settings,
    • Mortimer Hill,
    • Mortimer
    • Berks
    • RG7 3PW
    • Tel/fax 0118 9331520
    • [email_address]
    • www.transformingconflict.org