Evaas principal update (2)

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  • Participants turn and Talk: Benefits and Considerations? “Popcorn Out” All educators must learn to use the data. DATA CONVERSATIONS are imperative. Principal’s role is to prepare teachers to work with the data. The purpose of EVAAS is to support student understanding and to make appropriate instructional, logistical, and professional decisions to support student achievement and growth.
  • Often in middle schools, we test students by homeroom, and when our data returns, we must, at the school level, redistribute the students to align with the teacher that taught those students. EVAAS, however, is sophisticated enough to put kids in the classes where they belong because it pulls the student assignment from NCWISE. If the school’s NCWISE data is correct, the student will be properly placed with the appropriate teacher for each course. Talk about working with Kim to pull prediction data and used it in data conversations with every single EOC teacher. She provided each teacher with this information. Planning and discussion sessions.Used data in scheduling as well.
  • Changes in reporting for 2012-132011-12 Color coding and descriptorsAbove (Green) – students in the district made significantly more progress in this subject than students in the average district in NC. Progress was at least two standard errors above average.NDD (Yellow) – Not Detectably Different from students in the average district. Less than two standard errors above average and no more than two standard errors below it.Below (Light Red) – students in the district made significantly less progress in this subject than students in the average district in NC. Progress was more than two standard errors below average.2012-13 Color coding and descriptorsExceeds Expected Growth (Blue): Estimated mean NCE gain is above the growth standard by at least 2 standard errors. Meets Expected Growth (Green): Estimated mean NCE gain is below the growth standard by at most 2 standard errors but less than 2 standard error above it. Does Not Meet Expected Growth (Red): Estimated mean NCE gain is below the growth standard by more than 2 standard errors.The descriptors in EVAAS now match the Standard 6 Ratings.
  • Let’s take a few seconds to look at the different rating categories presented on this slide. For teachers, nothing changes about the first five standards. For standard six, the rating options are the following: does not meet expected growth, meets expected growth, and exceeds expected growth.
  • A focus on achievement or proficiency looks like this…Student is able to meet specific standards Students fall into a limited range or band of achievementDoes not account for change outside of that rangeDoes not account for student ability before they came to class“I can do it”
  • A focus on student growth or progress looks like…Takes into account student achievement within range or beyond that rangeCompares student achievement to how they were predicted to achieveDiscerns between teacher impact and student abilityAccounts for student ability before they came to class“Improvement or progression”
  • By concentrating on the growth students make, EVAAS puts the emphasis on something educators can influence.
  • Some people believe that this type of analysis is unfair because it penalizes economically disadvantaged students. This scatterplot illustrates the correlation between student achievement and poverty, which is unfair. Now let’s look at the correlation between student growth and poverty.Discuss ‘fair’ in relation to the data and to teacher evaluation/accountability vs. ‘fair’ delivery of curriculum and instruction to subgroups
  • Use this report to evaluate the overall effectiveness of a school on student progress. The School Value Added Report compares each school to the average school in the state. Comparisons are made for each subject tested in the given year and indicate how a school influences student progress in those subjects.* Facilitator preference for the next few slides until break – use only power point or use live site to model – more questions pop up when using the live site
  • Scores from the EOG tests are converted to State NCEs (Normal Curve Equivalent scores) for the purpose of these analyses. NCE scores have the advantage of being on an equal-interval scale, which allows for a comparison of students' academic attainment level across grades. NCE scores remain the same from year to year for students who make exactly one year of progress after one year of instruction, even though their raw scores would be different. Their NCE gain would be zero. If the Mean NCE Gain is greater than or equal to zero, the average student in this school has achieved a year’s worth of academic growth in a yearIf the Mean NCE Gain is greater than or equal to zero, the average student in this school has achieved a year’s worth of academic growth in a year
  • Student achievement levels appear at the bottom of the report in the Estimated School Mean NCE Scores section. The NCE Base is by definition set at 50.0, and it represents the average attainment level of students in the grade and subject, statewide. Compare the estimated grade/year mean for a school to the NCEBase. If the school mean is greater, the average student in the school is performing at a higher achievement level than the average student in the state.
  • Evaas principal update (2)

    1. 1. EVAASUpdates and Reminders Heather Mullins, Region 7 Professional Development Consultant
    2. 2. Table Talk • Who has EVAAS access in your LEA/Charter? • How are you currently using EVAAS? • What benefits/difficulties have you experienced? • What have you learned?
    3. 3. Benefits and Considerations for Teachers• Understand academic Professional preparedness of students before they enter the classroom. Development is• Monitor student progress, the Key ensuring growth opportunities • Data Conversations / True PLCs for all students. • Culture of School• Modify curriculum, student support, and instructional • Sensitivity of Data strategies to address the needs • Finger Pointing and Blame Game of all students. • Window vs. Mirror
    4. 4. Benefits for Principals• Gain a consolidated view of student progress and teacher effectiveness, as well as the impact of instruction and performance.• Bring clarity to strategic planning and function as a catalyst for conversations that must take place to ensure that all students reach their potential.• Understand and leverage the strengths of effective teachers.• Use the valuable resource of effective teaching to benefit as many students as possible.
    5. 5. Changes in Reporting for 2012-13 2011-12 2012-13 Above Exceeds Expected Growth Not Detectably Meets Expected Different Growth Below Does Not Meet Expected Growth
    6. 6. Teacher Ratings CategoriesTeachers 2012-13 1 2 3 4 5Demonstrate Leadership Establish Environment Know Content Exceeds Expected Growth Facilitate Learning Reflect on Practice 6 Contribute to Academic Success 5 Rating Categories Meets Expected 3 Rating Categories Growth Not Demonstrated Does Not Meet Expected Growth Developing Meets Expected Growth Does Not Meet Proficient Exceeds Expected Growth Expected Growth Accomplished Distinguished
    7. 7. Table Talk • How do you explain the concept of Achievement vs. Growth to others in your district?
    8. 8. Student Achievement Proficient End of School Year
    9. 9. Student Growth Proficient Not Proficient Start of End of School Year School Year
    10. 10. Achievement vs. GrowthStudent Achievement: Where are we?• Highly correlated with demographic factorsStudent Growth: How far have we come?• Highly dependent on what happens as a result of schooling rather than on demographic factors
    11. 11. Achievement and Poverty How is this fair?
    12. 12. Academic Growth and Poverty No one is doomed to failure.
    13. 13. The School Value Added Report compares eachschool to the average school in the state.Comparisons are made for eachsubject tested in the given yearand indicate how a schoolinfluences student progressin those subjects.
    14. 14. Value-Added Reporting
    15. 15. Mean NCE Gain• If the Mean NCE Gain is greater than or equal to zero, the average student in this school has achieved a year’s worth of academic growth in a year• If the Mean NCE Gain is less than zero, the average student in this school has achieved less growth than expected
    16. 16. Value-Added Reporting The NCE Base is by definition set at 50.0, and it represents the average attainment level of students in the grade and subject, statewide.If the school mean is greater, the average student inthe school is performing at a higher achievementlevel than the average student in the state.
    17. 17. Data Activity: http://bit.ly/EVAAS7

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