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Curriculum updates for schools

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  • The goal of this system is to provide a single sign on collaborative portal for NC educators to access high quality resources
  • Each of the parts of the IIS are described in the following slides. This slide is an overview of the components.
  • The Learner Profile and Work Samples component of the IIS provides an area for students and teachers to store work samples and other information longitudinally. The student area of this component will house student demographic data, longitudinal assessment results, learning styles or other useful information for planning appropriate instruction for the student. This data may come from other systems such as a Student Information System. The teacher area will allow teachers to upload evidence of their proficiency in meeting the teaching standards and contain other pertinent information about the teacher. Access to this and other modules will be role-based, protecting the privacy of the individual.
  • The Standards and Curriculum component focuses on the ability to manage multiple sets of standards (Common Core, NC Essential Standards, NC Teaching Standards, etc.) and to align IIS content and resources to those standards. The IIS content and resources that will be aligned to the standards includes curriculum and instructional resources (courses, units, activities, resources), assessment items, and professional development resources. Users will be able to easily search and analyze relationships between all resources and the standards. The system will provide tools for curriculum design, development, and best practices.  Content will come from multiple sources (teachers, LEAs, vendors, DPI, consortiums, and more) and will be vetted at several levels to assure quality alignment to standards. The development and management of curricular materials will be designed with role-based security to allow for a workflow The IIS will comprise six major component areas: Standards and Curriculum; Instructional Design, Practice, and Resources; Assessment and Growth; Data Analysis and Reporting; Professional Development; and Educator Evaluation. These focus areas will combine to support the Learner Profile component that will also contain learner work samples. in which submitted materials go through a review and approval process prior to being included in the official state, regional, or district curriculum.
  • The IIS will allow teachers to search for and select instructional materials for use in lesson plans from an approved and standards-aligned curriculum database. Teachers will be able to add or modify the instruction to customize it for students groups or individual students based on assessed needs.  The system will allow teachers to search for lesson plans by standard, grade, discipline, objective, theme, publisher, unit, and so on. Students and parents will have easy access to resources for learning that are specific to each student’s assessed instructional needs. The system will support the tracking of student activities and assessments directly linked to standards, benchmarks, and/or objectives. Assessments or assignments may be linked to the instruction with either manual scoring or on-line delivery and automatic scoring. Based on student assessment results, teachers will be able to use the IIS to identify and assign instructional material to students that specifically addresses the weaknesses uncovered by the assessment. Students will be provided collaborative work areas to work with fellow students as well as the ability to submit questions and get feedback from teachers.
  • The Assessment and Growth component has the capacity to assist instructional staff by allowing them to create, align, deliver, and manage various levels and types of assessment items and strategies ranging from daily classroom formative assessment to district interim/benchmark testing to statewide grades 3-8 and High School summative assessments.  The assessment component serves as a repository for pre-constructed test items and also will display a robust set of tools that allows the teachers and accountability personnel to create and build multiple levels of assessment aligned to the instructional objectives contained within a curriculum. The system will also allow end-users to import pre-constructed assessment items/tasks and formats (including rubrics) to augment locally-developed items/tasks. The resources available through this component will add to the depth of items/tasks available for use at the classroom level across the state. The assessment system will also have a well-developed reporting system that will enable teachers to aggregate and disaggregate assessment data from multiple sources to analyze student performance and instructional needs. The ability of the assessment system to effectively aggregate and disaggregate assessment results on the basis of pre-set formats or user-defined constraints is one of the ways that the IIS may be used to improve student educational outcomes.
  • The data analysis and reporting component of the IIS will provide a wealth of information to teachers, students and administrators and will enable teachers to modify the learning process and and assign instructional resources to meet each student’s needs. This component can provide a student-achievement profile that contains the student’s current level of mastery on standards, benchmarks, objectives, and skills. It can provide to administrators data on teacher effectiveness and demographic, program, and achievement data.  Access to data from all areas of the system will be role-based and highly secure. The system will provide immediate access to all types of integrated student information through system-generated reports which enable teachers and administrators to quickly and efficiently determine students’ academic performance and growth needs. School leaders will be able to aggregate data across schools, classrooms, and grades and compare those assessment findings with pre-determined standards of achievement. The system will also provide operations so educators can “drill-down” into the data and perform more detailed analysis of student performance patterns and trends.
  • The professional development module of the IIS adopts a proficiency-based approach to human resource management. Data from the IIS system provided to the educator evaluation component of the IIS will enable NCDPI to link and align staff development with curriculum, assessment, learner needs, instructional materials, and the supervision/evaluation process. Educators will be able to create individual staff development plans which address the gaps between their required and mastered lists of job- related proficiencies. The assessment component of the staff development program will not be based upon educators earning a “grade” but rather on attaining specific “proficiencies”. For classroom teachers, this may also include a summary of the curriculum, assessment, and instructional resources that align with the acquired proficiency. The online IIS North Carolina Educator Evaluation System (NCEES) instrument will automate the North Carolina Teacher Evaluation Process and the North Carolina School Executive: Principal and Assistant Principal Evaluation Process. The system will allow all employees to complete self-assessments and Professional Development Plans. The system will allow employees to set goals annually and will provide principals/supervisors the ability to modify goals and include feedback to employee. By importing student assessment data, the system will enable administrators to consider student growth as one of the measures of teacher effectiveness.
  • All resources that will be a part of the IIS must meet the criteria:
  • These are free resources that many schools are already using, but once part of the IIS teachers will not have to go to each individual site to search. The IIS will search for the topic in all the sources available.
  • The above examples are linked to show examples of some of the 3rd party instructional activities that are available.
  • The IIS will have a new name once the Vendor is announced and awarded the contract in December. Our system WCS is not part of the pilot so our first experience will be in 2013-2014.
  • The K-12 Curriculum and Instruction Website is not linked to all the updated information. You no longer need to go to the ACRE site to access Common Core and Essential Standards information.
  • ASCD has a new site for tools for Common Core. The resources at this site have been funded through the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. At this time it only has resources for high school and middle school, but elementary resources will be available later.
  • An educator status is a more holistic picture of educator effectiveness than any one standard taken alone. Three years of data must be in place before a teacher or administrator can receive a status of in need of improvement, effective, or highly effective.
  • If teachers click on the box for the sixth standard, it will expand to show component data for the standard rating, as well as three years of data as they are accumulated.
  • Our district is working on an implementation plan. At this time the common exams will be given in Social Studies and Science to all students. Common Exams will be give 1-2 weeks before EOG’s. An implementation guide with information on administration, scoring, etc. will be available soon.
  • The new Ready Accountability Model has will be voted on at the State Board in the coming months. The General Assembly passed legislation this summer to add an assignment of A-F grades to all school report cards.
  • For elementary and middle school the A-F grade will come completely from the Performance Composite + growth.
  • Explains each of the categories for high school.

Transcript

  • 1. Curriculum and Instruction Updates November, 2012 * Information was compiled from C&I Update meetings in OctoberDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
  • 2. Instructional Improvement SystemCurriculum & Instructional Leaders’ Forum
  • 3. Instructional Improvement System Why – How – What -- When ▲ ▲ Why an Instructional Improvement System? Improve and personalize student learning How? Facilitate the teaching and learning process through • Increased access to high quality resources for all • Provision of timely and relevant information and dataDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
  • 4. Technology Platform One Technology Platform • Single Sign-on Instructional PowerSchool Improvement • Collaborative System • Populated with resources for NC Student educators Tools for Informati Teaching on and System Coming Soon Learning (SIS) (IIS)Draft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
  • 5. Instructional Improvement System Learner Profile Standards & Instructional Assessment & Data Analysis Professional and Work Curriculum Design, Practice & Analytics and Reporting Development & Samples Resources Educator EvaluationDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
  • 6. Learner Profile and Work Samples • Teacher has access to learner information to assist with planning and monitoring • Teacher can use examples of student work for future lessons • Student can collect evidence of learning and growth • Parents can view student workDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
  • 7. Standards and CurriculumDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
  • 8. Instructional Design, Practice and Resources ExampleDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
  • 9. Assessment and GrowthDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
  • 10. Dashboards, Data Analysis and ReportingDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
  • 11. Professional Development and Educator Evaluation • View, register for, participate in PD • View past PD participation • Get suggestions for PD based on class performance or observation/evaluation data • Receive recommendations for license renewal credit • Implement educator evaluation processesDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
  • 12. Guiding Principles – Resources must • Be aligned with standards • Provide ample To make the resources in the coverage to all standards and IIS meaningful and useful to objectives teachers: • Emphasize quality over quantity • Be reviewed and rated by educators in North CarolinaDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
  • 13. Some of Our Content Sources Multiple SubjectsDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
  • 14. Some of Our Content Sources MathDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
  • 15. Some of Our Content Sources ScienceDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
  • 16. Some of Our Content Sources English Language ArtsDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
  • 17. Sample 3rd Party Instructional Activities National Archives PhetDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
  • 18. Instructional Improvement System Why – How – What -- When ▲ RFP Issued Reviewed Proposals Negotiated with Select Vendors Data Integration Feb 27, 2012 April – June Pilot 2012 June – October 2012 Fall 2012 Vendor Approval & Contract Award Design and Build IIS Pilot Phased-In December Roll out 2012 December 2012  Early 2013  Starting 2013-14 School YearDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
  • 19. Common Core andEssential Standards Resources
  • 20. C&I Links http://www.dpi.state.nc.us/curriculum/Draft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
  • 21. C&I Links http://www.dpi.state.nc.us/curriculum/Draft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
  • 22. Partners: ASCD http://educore.ascd.org/Draft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
  • 23. Educator Effectiveness and Common ExamsDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
  • 24. Why educator effectiveness? NC is implementing a new curriculum, new assessments, new technology tools to improve instruction, new ways of engaging students, and the list goes on… So why is the State focusing on educator effectiveness in the face of so many other changes? Because all our efforts in other areas depend on an effective teacher in every classroom and an effective leader in every school building.Draft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
  • 25. Why educator effectiveness? The work around educator effectiveness, including the Measures of Student Learning, is grounded in the belief that: Every student in North Carolina deserves an effective teacher in all courses and grades. Our students need to learn all of the standards in the North Carolina Standard Course of Study in order to be READY for their futures.Draft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
  • 26. Why educator effectiveness? In order to increase their effectiveness, teachers need access to high-quality data. Every teacher in North Carolina deserves feedback on the growth of their students. It’s not about firing our way to a better teaching force. It’s about creating a system that: • Identifies the strongest teachers so that we can all learn from them, and • Identifies those teachers who need additional support and targets that support to their needsDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
  • 27. Re-creation of chart from Gathering Feedback For Teaching, http://www.metproject.org/downloads/MET_Gathering_Feedback_Practioner_Brief.pdf Observation + Other Measures Rationale - MET Research - Standard 6 & 8 - Status - Support - MSLs ▲ Months of Learning Gained or Lost State Math State ELA Observation Tool Top 25% +1.2 +.2 Bottom 25% -1.4 -.4 Observation Tool Top 25% +2.8 +.7 + Student Survey Bottom 25% -2 -.9 Observation Tool Top 25% +4.5 +1.2 + Student Survey + Growth (Value-Add) Bottom 25% -3.1 -1.3 Draft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
  • 28. Observation + Other Measures • Standard 6 and 8 Final components of Standards 6 and 8 and their respective weightings • Status Consequences and professional development for educators “in need of improvement” • Common Exams Measures of growth in English Language Arts, Science, Social Studies, and Mathematics in grades 4 – 12 • Other Options Measures of growth in K-2, grade 3, and performance areasDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation 11/26/2012 • page 28
  • 29. Standards 6 & 8 – The BasicsTeachers 1 2 3 4 5 6Demonstrate Establish Leadership Environment Know Content Facilitate Learning Reflect on Contribute Practice to Academic SuccessPrincipals (and other Administrators) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Strategic Instructional Cultural Human Managerial External Micro- Academic Leadership Leadership Leadership Resource Leadership Development political Achievement Leadership Leadership Leadership LeadershipDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation 11/26/2012 • page 29
  • 30. Growth ModelTeachers Standard 6 and 8 6 Contribute to Academic Success are measures ofPrincipals Growth 8 Academic Academic Achievement Achievement Leadership LeadershipDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation 11/26/2012 • page 30
  • 31. Growth ModelTeachers We will use 6 Contribute to Academic Success Educator Value-AddedPrincipals Assessment System EVAAS 8 Academic Academic Achievement Achievement Leadership Leadership for standards 6 & 8 when possibleDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation 11/26/2012 • page 31
  • 32. Determining Growth TCP-C-006 now provides clarity around whichWhat do we need? assessments are used to measure growth End-of-Grade Assessments CTE Post- Teacher Assessments Growth Value EVAAS for Sixth Common Standard Exams Rating End-of-Course AssessmentsDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation 11/26/2012 • page 32
  • 33. Growth ModelTeachers How do Value-Added models work? 6 Contribute to Academic Success • They measure growth by predicting how well a student will do on an assessment. How do they predict how wellPrincipals the student will do? • They look at previous test scores and estimate how well 8 Academic Academic Achievement the student should do at the end of the year. Achievement Leadership Every student must grow based on where they start. LeadershipDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation 11/26/2012 • page 33
  • 34. Teacher Ratings Categories ▲Teachers 1 2 3 4 5 6Demonstrate Establish Know Facilitate Reflect on Contribute Leadership Environment Content Learning Practice to Academic Success 5 Rating Categories 3 Rating Categories Not Demonstrated Does not Meet Expected Growth Developing Meets Expected Growth Proficient Exceeds Expected Growth Accomplished DistinguishedDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation 11/26/2012 • page 34
  • 35. RatingsTeachers 1 2 3 4 5 6Demonstrate Establish Know Facilitate Reflect on Contribute Leadership Environment Content Learning Practice to Academic Success 5 Rating Categories 3 Ratings Categories Why the difference? Identifying only three rating categories on standard 6 & 8 improves certainty of categorization.Draft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
  • 36. Teacher Ratings in 2011-12 Yearly Rating Teacher EVAAS Growth 70% 30% School- wide EVAAS Growth • Does not Meet Expected Growth • Meets Expected Growth • Exceeds Expected Growth 6 Weighted Average Why is school-wide EVAAS growth included? • To encourage collaboration and collective ownership of overall outcomes. Note: In 2011-12, teachers without individual EVAAS growth will have school-wide growth for Standard 6.Draft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
  • 37. Teacher Ratings in 2012-13 The first year that Standard Six “counts” for a teacher is 2012 – 2013 (if the growth data is specific to the teacher and the students) Possible additional 6 School- elements Yearly Rating Teacher Team Student • Does not EVAAS wide EVAAS Surveys Expected Growth Growth EVAAS Growth (?) (?) • Meets Expected Growth Growth • Exceeds Expected Growth Weighted AverageDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation 11/26/2012 • page 37
  • 38. Ratings Teachers 1 2 3 4 5 6 Demonstrate Leadership Establish Environment Know Content Facilitate Learning Reflect on Practice Contribute to Academic Success Principals 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Strategic Instructional Cultural Human Managerial External Micro- Academic Leadership Leadership Leadership Resource Leadership Development political Achievement Leadership Leadership Leadership Leadership Key Note on Ratings • Every educator is evaluated every year • Each standard and rating stands on its own (1 out of 6, not 1/6) • Ratings are used to create professional development plans each year • Ratings are used to determine statusDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
  • 39. Status What is the difference between Ratings and Status?Draft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation 11/26/2012 • page 39
  • 40. Status Ratings Status • Teachers • A single overall status that 6 separate ratings to help is determined once a teachers grow each year principal or teacher has three years of growth • Principals data to populate 6 or 8 8 separate ratings to help principals grow each year • Categories for Status 1. In Need of Improvement 2. Effective 3. Highly EffectiveDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation 11/26/2012 • page 40
  • 41. Status and Standard 6 & 8 • An educator receives an effectiveness status only once she has 3 years of data on Standard 6 or 8 • A 3-year rolling average of growth data from standard 6 or 8 is used as part of determining overall statusDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation 11/26/2012 • page 41
  • 42. 3-Year Rolling Average Rating from Rating from Rating from 2012 - 2013 2013 - 2014 2014 - 2015 1.9 + -2.5 + 1.2 Standard Standard Standard 6 6 6 Contribute to Academic Success 3 = .2 1.9 -2.5 1.2 Met Expected Growth Met Did not Met 3- year average rating on Expected meet Expected standard 6 for Growth Expected Growth determining status Note: A similar methodology applies to principals as well. Growth Note: The values above represent values from the MRM model in EVAAS.Draft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation 11/26/2012 • page 42
  • 43. Three Years of Data Any three years of data attributable to a teacher or principal will be combined and used: • Any grades • Any subjects • Any schools • Any districts The three years of data do not start until they are specific to that teacher and his or her studentsDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation 11/26/2012 • page 43
  • 44. Status So once a educator has a three-year average rating for Standard 6 or 8, how is status determined?Draft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation 11/26/2012 • page 44
  • 45. Teacher Status In Need of Highly Effective Improvement Effective Standards 1-5 Any rating Proficient Accomplis In the year lower than or Higher hed proficient on Standards 1 2 3 4 5Demonstrate Establish Leadership Environment Know Content Facilitate Learning Reflect on Practice 1-5 or Higher on And/Or And Standards And 1-5 Standard 6 Does Not Meets or Exceeds Three-year rolling average Meet Exceeds Expected ) Expected Expected Growth 6 2 years ago 6 + 1ago + year 6 This year )/ 3 Growth Growth Draft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
  • 46. What Will Teachers See? • Ratings on Standards 1 – 5 of the Educator Evaluation System (as recorded in online tool) • Standard 6 rating (current year and 2 prior years) • Three-year rolling average of student growth values and accompanying Standard 6 rating (for Status determination) • Overall Effectiveness StatusDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation 11/26/2012 • page 46
  • 47. Draft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
  • 48. Draft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
  • 49. Draft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
  • 50. Detail on the Sixth Standard RatingDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
  • 51. Common ExamsDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
  • 52. Common Exams A Library of Common Exams is being designed for non-tested subjects for district use to populate Standard 6Draft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation 11/26/2012 • page 52
  • 53. Focusing on the “Why” So why have statewide Measures of Student Learning/Common Exams? 1. North Carolina has a statewide evaluation system to ensure that every teacher receives a fair and consistent evaluation, regardless of his or her employing LEA 2. Teachers in all content areas should receive a Standard Six rating based on the growth of their own students on their content-specific standards 3. Most LEAs do not have the capacity to design their own assessments for all non state-tested grades and subjectsDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation 11/26/2012 • page 53
  • 54. Principles for Administration 1. Every English Language Arts, Science, Mathematics, and Social Studies teacher in grades 4 – 12 has a value-added score 2. Teacher growth values will be calculated based on all students a teacher teaches and, when multiple assessments are required, on all data generated through the assessmentsDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation 11/26/2012 • page 54
  • 55. Decision Tree for AdministrationDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation 11/26/2012 • page 55
  • 56. District Flexibility • Administration online, paper/pencil or hybrid • Date of administration • Administration during class period or testing week • Use in student grade • Which assessments are administered • How to ensure secure administrationDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation 11/26/2012 • page 56
  • 57. Addressing Concerns Who has designed the Common Exams, and how have they been designed? •Same basic process as state assessments with the creation of assessment blueprints, generation of items, review of items, review of forms, and final production •Over 800 teachers from across the State have involved in the blueprint creation and form review processes •NCDPI psychometricians and test measurement specialists have been involved and will analyze (and remove from results) any poor-performing items before growth is calculatedDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation 11/26/2012 • page 57
  • 58. Addressing Concerns Why doesn’t anyone know what will be on the MSLs? •Assessment specifications are available at: http://www.ncpublicschools.org/educatoreffect/measures/spe cifications/ •General information on rubrics released to C&I leaders on October 19 (and posted to website) •Online module will provide training on how to use rubrics to score performance tasks •Each item has its own specific rubricDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation 11/26/2012 • page 58
  • 59. Addressing Concerns How will the performance items be graded? •There must be at least one grader who is not the student’s teacher of record AND who has the content knowledge necessary to score the item •With the exception of ELA, performance items can be administered early to allow time for scoring •Scoring of work is necessary for what the 800 teachers deemed to be authentic assessment for new, concept-based standardsDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation 11/26/2012 • page 59
  • 60. Addressing Concerns MSLs hurt students and teachers •The Common Exam administration process should not affect students any differently than the administration of a teacher-created final exam •MSL scores do not need to be used as final exam grades •Percent correct provided by Winscan is a suggestion for a grade •It is only fair to base SOME part of a teacher’s evaluation on the growth of his or her studentsDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation 11/26/2012 • page 60
  • 61. Operationalizing the General Assembly’s School Performance Grades (Senate Bill 795, Excellent Public Schools Act) October 19, 2012 Curriculum & Instructional Leaders’ 61 ForumDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
  • 62. Context ACRE/READ General Y Accountability Revision Assembly 2012 • SBE approved college ►Summer 2012 and career ready indicators for 2012-13 GA’s budget SY and reporting of the requires the 2011 READY Accountability assignment of Model A-F grades for all • Approval of ESEA 2010 waiver to use proposed schools READY model 2009Draft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation 62
  • 63. Responding to School Performance Grades (SPG) • The SBE must respond to the General Assembly “…annually by January 15 on recommended adjustments to the school performance grade elements and scales for award of scores and grades.” • Additionally, SECTION 7A.3.(f) indicates: “It is the intent of the General Assembly to add a student growth component to school performance grades.” • Operational in 2012-13Draft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation 63
  • 64. What are the basics of the SPGs? Elementary/Middle Total Points 0- Schools 100 • Performance Composite 100 points Total Points 0- High Schools 500 • Performance Composite 100 points • Algebra II/Integrated III 100 points • Graduation Rate 100 points • WorkKeys 100 points • ACT 100 points + GrowthDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation 64
  • 65. Alignment Between Indicators in High School High School Performance Grades End of Course • Performance Composite • Algebra II/Integrated III Math Course Rigor • Graduation Rate Graduation Rates • WorkKeys • ACT WorkKeys ACT Key Point: The set of indicators are shared and set a college and career- Graduation Project ready expectation. The Graduation Project is 65 part of the school grade. not 65Draft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
  • 66. How each indicator is defined Performance • Percent of proficient tests in a school Composite • All tests, subjects, and grade levels (Elementary and High) • Uses the EOG/EOC test data Algebra II/Integrated • Percent of 4-year cohort graduates who III take and pass Alg. II or Int. Math III • Excludes the 1% population Graduation Rate • Percent of students that graduate within 4 years (4-year cohort graduation rate) WorkKeys • Percent of seniors who are CTE concentrators who achieve a Silver certificate, or better, on the WorkKeys assessment ACT • The average sum of the 5 sub-tests across the school compared to the sum of the college- ready benchmarksDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation 66
  • 67. A closer look at the ACT The proposed Math that goes into the ACT calculation ACT College Ready Benchmarks Subtest Benchmark Math 22 Reading 21 22 + 21 + 18 + 24 + 7 = 92 English 18 sum of Science 24 college- Writing 7 ready benchmarksDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation 67
  • 68. A closer look at the ACT The proposed Math that goes into the ACT calculation Suppose you have a school with 5 students…. then Student Sum of “The average sum of the 5 sub-tests across Scores the school compared to the sum of the Matt 83 college-ready benchmarks” can be found Mark 94 by… Luke 75 1) Averaging the Summed Scores John 79 83 + 94 + 75 +79 + 80 = 82.2 Paul 80 5 students 2) Dividing by summed college- ready benchmarks 82.2/92 = 89% and 89 pointsDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation 68
  • 69. Proposal for Addition of Growth • Using EVAAS Growth outcomes, adjust overall score based on EVAAS category – Exceeded Expected Growth: Add 10 points – Met Expected Growth: Add 5 points – Did Not Meet Growth: No pointsDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation 69
  • 70. Proposal for Addition of Growth Rationale for this suggested methodology: • Incentivizes pursuit of growth • Can make a one-letter grade difference between school with similar status • Grades still mean something largely consistent and comparable for parentsDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation 70
  • 71. Overall Grade • Elementary/Middle Schools – Single component – 100 point scale • High Schools – Five components 0-500 points – Divide by 5 to achieve a 100 point scale • In both cases, make the Growth Adjustment (0, 5 or 10 points)Draft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation 71
  • 72. Overall Grade Scale A: 90-100 points B: 80-89 points C: 70-79 points D: 60-69 points F: Less than 60 pointsDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation 72
  • 73. Overall Grade Sample High School X • Performance Composite 69 points • Algebra II/Integrated III 78 points • Graduation Rate 82 points • WorkKeys 84 points • ACT + 82 points Total Points 395vide by 5 to get points out of 100 395/5 = 79 Check Growth School Met Expected Growth Add Growth Points 79 + 5 = 84 points Determine Final Grade This School would receive a “B” 73 Draft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
  • 74. Next Steps • Gather feedback across state – including now • Return to the General Assembly with an operational proposal in January 2013 per the requirement of the billDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation 74