C&i update[1]

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  • The goal of this system is to provide a single sign on collaborative portal for NC educators to access high quality resources
  • Sarah
  • The Learner Profile and Work Samples component of the IIS provides an area for students and teachers to store work samples and other information longitudinally. The student area of this component will house student demographic data, longitudinal assessment results, learning styles or other useful information for planning appropriate instruction for the student. This data may come from other systems such as a Student Information System. The teacher area will allow teachers to upload evidence of their proficiency in meeting the teaching standards and contain other pertinent information about the teacher. Access to this and other modules will be role-based, protecting the privacy of the individual.
  • The Standards and Curriculum component focuses on the ability to manage multiple sets of standards (Common Core, NC Essential Standards, NC Teaching Standards, etc.) and to align IIS content and resources to those standards. The IIS content and resources that will be aligned to the standards includes curriculum and instructional resources (courses, units, activities, resources), assessment items, and professional development resources. Users will be able to easily search and analyze relationships between all resources and the standards. The system will provide tools for curriculum design, development, and best practices.  Content will come from multiple sources (teachers, LEAs, vendors, DPI, consortiums, and more) and will be vetted at several levels to assure quality alignment to standards. The development and management of curricular materials will be designed with role-based security to allow for a workflow The IIS will comprise six major component areas: Standards and Curriculum; Instructional Design, Practice, and Resources; Assessment and Growth; Data Analysis and Reporting; Professional Development; and Educator Evaluation. These focus areas will combine to support the Learner Profile component that will also contain learner work samples. in which submitted materials go through a review and approval process prior to being included in the official state, regional, or district curriculum.
  • The IIS will allow teachers to search for and select instructional materials for use in lesson plans from an approved and standards-aligned curriculum database. Teachers will be able to add or modify the instruction to customize it for students groups or individual students based on assessed needs.  The system will allow teachers to search for lesson plans by standard, grade, discipline, objective, theme, publisher, unit, and so on. Students and parents will have easy access to resources for learning that are specific to each student’s assessed instructional needs. The system will support the tracking of student activities and assessments directly linked to standards, benchmarks, and/or objectives. Assessments or assignments may be linked to the instruction with either manual scoring or on-line delivery and automatic scoring. Based on student assessment results, teachers will be able to use the IIS to identify and assign instructional material to students that specifically addresses the weaknesses uncovered by the assessment. Students will be provided collaborative work areas to work with fellow students as well as the ability to submit questions and get feedback from teachers.
  • The Assessment and Growth component has the capacity to assist instructional staff by allowing them to create, align, deliver, and manage various levels and types of assessment items and strategies ranging from daily classroom formative assessment to district interim/benchmark testing to statewide grades 3-8 and High School summative assessments.  The assessment component serves as a repository for pre-constructed test items and also will display a robust set of tools that allows the teachers and accountability personnel to create and build multiple levels of assessment aligned to the instructional objectives contained within a curriculum. The system will also allow end-users to import pre-constructed assessment items/tasks and formats (including rubrics) to augment locally-developed items/tasks. The resources available through this component will add to the depth of items/tasks available for use at the classroom level across the state. The assessment system will also have a well-developed reporting system that will enable teachers to aggregate and disaggregate assessment data from multiple sources to analyze student performance and instructional needs. The ability of the assessment system to effectively aggregate and disaggregate assessment results on the basis of pre-set formats or user-defined constraints is one of the ways that the IIS may be used to improve student educational outcomes.
  • The data analysis and reporting component of the IIS will provide a wealth of information to teachers, students and administrators and will enable teachers to modify the learning process and and assign instructional resources to meet each student’s needs. This component can provide a student-achievement profile that contains the student’s current level of mastery on standards, benchmarks, objectives, and skills. It can provide to administrators data on teacher effectiveness and demographic, program, and achievement data.  Access to data from all areas of the system will be role-based and highly secure. The system will provide immediate access to all types of integrated student information through system-generated reports which enable teachers and administrators to quickly and efficiently determine students’ academic performance and growth needs. School leaders will be able to aggregate data across schools, classrooms, and grades and compare those assessment findings with pre-determined standards of achievement. The system will also provide operations so educators can “drill-down” into the data and perform more detailed analysis of student performance patterns and trends.
  • The professional development module of the IIS adopts a proficiency-based approach to human resource management. Data from the IIS system provided to the educator evaluation component of the IIS will enable NCDPI to link and align staff development with curriculum, assessment, learner needs, instructional materials, and the supervision/evaluation process. Educators will be able to create individual staff development plans which address the gaps between their required and mastered lists of job- related proficiencies. The assessment component of the staff development program will not be based upon educators earning a “grade” but rather on attaining specific “proficiencies”. For classroom teachers, this may also include a summary of the curriculum, assessment, and instructional resources that align with the acquired proficiency. The online IIS North Carolina Educator Evaluation System (NCEES) instrument will automate the North Carolina Teacher Evaluation Process and the North Carolina School Executive: Principal and Assistant Principal Evaluation Process. The system will allow all employees to complete self-assessments and Professional Development Plans. The system will allow employees to set goals annually and will provide principals/supervisors the ability to modify goals and include feedback to employee. By importing student assessment data, the system will enable administrators to consider student growth as one of the measures of teacher effectiveness.
  • Sarah
  • Dan/LaVerne
  • C&i update[1]

    1. 1. Standards Opportunities to Learn More at http://www.ncpublicschools.org District Leadership Teams Established Summer of 2011 Modules https://center.ncsu.edu/nc/ Support Tools http://www.ncdpi.wikispaces.net/ C&I Links http://www.dpi.state.nc.us/curriculum/ Summer Institutes Summer 2012 Moving From What to How /profdev/conferences/summerinstitutes/ Regional-based Throughout 2012 Content Training http://www.ncpublicschools.org/acre/profdev/di Moving From What to How strict/Draft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
    2. 2. C&I Links http://www.dpi.state.nc.us/curriculum/Draft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
    3. 3. C&I Links http://www.dpi.state.nc.us/curriculum/Draft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
    4. 4. Partners: ASCD http://educore.ascd.org/Draft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
    5. 5. EduCore Literacy ToolsDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
    6. 6. EduCore Literacy ToolsDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
    7. 7. EduCore Math ToolsDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
    8. 8. EduCore High School ResourcesDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
    9. 9. EduCore LessonsDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
    10. 10. Moving Forward: High School Math Discussion What: NC High School Math Task Force Who: Regional Representatives (School Representatives, District Representatives, IHE Representations, etc.) When: Spring, 2013 Why: Determine the best course of action to “streamline” the current HS Math PathwaysDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
    11. 11. Current High School Math Pathways • Common Core Traditional Pathway • Common Core Integrated Pathway • Common Core I, II, and II Pathway (Local Course Code Option)Draft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
    12. 12. Additional HS Math MSLs/Common Exams – 2012-2013 School Year • Common Core Algebra II • Common Core Geometry • Common Core Integrated Math III • Common Core II (Local Course Code Option) • Common Core III (Local Course Code Option)Draft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
    13. 13. Maria Pitre-Martin Director of K-12 Curriculum and Instruction North Carolina Department of Instruction 919-807-3817 Maria.pitremartin@dpi.nc.govDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation 13
    14. 14. Instructional Improvement System and NC FALCON UpdatesCurriculum & Instructional Leaders’ Forum
    15. 15. Instructional Improvement System Why – How – What -- When ▲ ▲ Why an Instructional Improvement System? Improve and personalize student learning How? Facilitate the teaching and learning process through • Increased access to high quality resources for all • Provision of timely and relevant information and dataDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
    16. 16. Technology Platform One Technology Platform • Single Sign-on Instructional PowerSchool Improvement • Collaborative System • Populated with resources for NC Student educators Tools for Informati Teaching on and System Coming Soon Learning (SIS) (IIS)Draft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
    17. 17. Instructional Improvement System Learner Profile Standards & Instructional Assessment & Data Analysis Professional and Work Curriculum Design, Practice & Analytics and Reporting Development & Samples Resources Educator EvaluationDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
    18. 18. Learner Profile and Work Samples • Teacher has access to learner information to assist with planning and monitoring • Teacher can use examples of student work for future lessons • Student can collect evidence of learning and growth • Parents can view student workDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
    19. 19. Standards and CurriculumDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
    20. 20. Instructional Design, Practice and Resources ExampleDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
    21. 21. Assessment and GrowthDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
    22. 22. Dashboards, Data Analysis and ReportingDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
    23. 23. Professional Development and Educator Evaluation • View, register for, participate in PD • View past PD participation • Get suggestions for PD based on class performance or observation/evaluation data • Receive recommendations for license renewal credit • Implement educator evaluation processesDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
    24. 24. Types of Content/Resources • What kinds of resources will make up the IIS? – Instructional (lesson plans, unit guides, activities) – Assessment (formative assessment resources, item banks, summative assessments) – Professional Development (videos, articles, webinars) – Educator Evaluation/Talent Management (rubrics, evaluation tools, artifact tools)Draft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
    25. 25. Guiding Principles – Resources must • Be aligned with standards To make the resources in the • Provide ample coverage to all IIS meaningful standards and and useful to objectives teachers: • Emphasize quality over quantity • Be reviewed and rated by educators in North CarolinaDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
    26. 26. Some of Our Content Sources Multiple SubjectsDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
    27. 27. Some of Our Content Sources MathDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
    28. 28. Some of Our Content Sources ScienceDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
    29. 29. Some of Our Content Sources English Language ArtsDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
    30. 30. Sample 3rd Party Instructional Activities National Archives PhetDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
    31. 31. Objective Solicit and gather content from LEAs and Schools The Members Represent the following School Districts: Alamance-Burlington Schools Hoke County Person County Schools Asheboro City Schools Hyde County Pitt County Schools Burke County Schools Jones County Schools Rutherford County Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools Martin County Schools Transylvania County Schools Cleveland County Schools Montgomery County Schools Union County Cumberland County Schools Moore County Schools Wake County Public Schools Edenton-Chowan Mooresville Graded School Wayne County Public Schools Forsyth County Schools Newton-Conover City Schools Whiteville City Schools Gaston County Schools Onslow County Schools Guilford County Orange County Halifax County Schools Pender County Schools ** New members from Summer Institutes, NCSBA and Tech. Directors’ meetingsDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
    32. 32. Sample LEA PD ResourceDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
    33. 33. Sample LEA Assessment ResourcesDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
    34. 34. Sample LEA Instructional ResourcesDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
    35. 35. NC FALCON Updates Carmella Fair
    36. 36. NC FALCON Updates • Formative Assessment Plans • NC FALCON Modules • NC FALCON Coordinator MeetingsDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
    37. 37. NC Definition of Formative Assessment – Formative assessment is a process used by teachers and students during instruction that provides feedback to adjust ongoing teaching and learning to help students improve their achievement of intended instructional outcomes. The Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO, 2008)Draft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
    38. 38. Formative Assessment Plans • Formative Assessment Plans developed by teachers • Located in NC Education/NC FALCON – center.ncsu.edu/nc – “Formative Assessment Plans” – enroll in the “course”Draft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
    39. 39. Formative Assessment Plans Plans were developed by NC teachers for these content and program areas: Arts Education English as a Second Science Language (ESL) Career and Technical Healthful Living Social Studies Education (CTE) English Language Arts Mathematics World Languages (ELA)Draft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
    40. 40. Draft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
    41. 41. NC FALCON Modules – Modules for Teachers – New Module for Students • About the Student Ownership Of Learning Module • Piloting the student moduleDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
    42. 42. NC FALCON Coordinator Meetings Future Meetings (Webinars) September 19, 2012 3:30 – 5:00 September 25, 2012 November 14, 2012 3:30 – 5:00 February 13, 2013 3:30 – 5:00 April 24, 2013 3:30 – 5:00Draft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
    43. 43. Contact Sarah McManus Director 919-807-3668 Learning Systems sarah.mcmanus@ dpi.nc.gov IIS Cynthia Crowdus IIS Project Coordinator 919-807-3205 Cynthia.crowdus@ dpi.nc.gov Dan Gwaltney Consultant 919-807-3249 Dan.gwaltney@ dpi.nc.govDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
    44. 44. Instructional Improvement System Why – How – What -- When ▲ RFP Issued Reviewed Proposals Negotiated with Select Vendors Data Integration Feb 27, 2012 April – June Pilot 2012 June – October 2012 Fall 2012 Vendor Approval & Contract Award Design and Build IIS Pilot Phased-In December Roll out 2012 December 2012  Early 2013  Starting 2013-14 School YearDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
    45. 45. Common Exams • General Rubrics are available. • Assessments will have task specific rubrics • Sample Questions • Online ???? • SchedulingDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
    46. 46. Operationalizing the General Assembly’s School Performance Grades (Senate Bill 795, Excellent Public Schools Act) October 19, 2012 Curriculum & Instructional Leaders’ 46 ForumDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
    47. 47. Context ACRE/READ General Y Accountability Revision Assembly ►Summer 2012 2012 • SBE approved college GA’s budget and career ready indicators for 2012-13 requires the SY and reporting of the assignment of 2011 READY Accountability A-F grades for all Model schools • Approval of ESEA 2010 waiver to use proposed READY model 2009Draft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation 47
    48. 48. Responding to School Performance Grades (SPG) • The SBE must respond to the General Assembly “…annually by January 15 on recommended adjustments to the school performance grade elements and scales for award of scores and grades.” • Additionally, SECTION 7A.3.(f) indicates: “It is the intent of the General Assembly to add a student growth component to school performance grades.” • Operational in 2012-13Draft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation 48
    49. 49. What are the basics of the SPGs? Elementary/Middle Total Points 0- Schools 100 • Performance Composite 100 points Total Points 0- High Schools 500 • Performance Composite 100 points • Algebra II/Integrated III 100 points • Graduation Rate 100 points • WorkKeys 100 points • ACT 100 points + GrowthDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation 49
    50. 50. Alignment Between Indicators in High School High School Performance Grades End of Course • Performance Composite • Algebra II/Integrated III Math Course Rigor • Graduation Rate Graduation Rates • WorkKeys • ACT WorkKeys ACT Key Point: The set of indicators are shared and set a college and career- Graduation Project ready expectation. The Graduation Project is 50 part of the school grade. not 50Draft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
    51. 51. How each indicator is defined Performance • Percent of proficient tests in a school Composite • All tests, subjects, and grade levels (Elementary and High) • Uses the EOG/EOC test data Algebra II/Integrated • Percent of 4-year cohort graduates who III take and pass Alg. II or Int. Math III • Excludes the 1% population Graduation Rate • Percent of students that graduate within 4 years (4-year cohort graduation rate) WorkKeys • Percent of seniors who are CTE concentrators who achieve a Silver certificate, or better, on the WorkKeys assessment ACT • The average sum of the 5 sub-tests across the school compared to the sum of the college- ready benchmarksDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation 51
    52. 52. A closer look at the ACT The proposed Math that goes into the ACT calculation ACT College Ready Benchmarks Subtes Benchmar t k Math 22 Readin 21 22 + 21 + 18 + 24 + 7 92 = g sum of English 18 college-ready Scienc 24 benchmarks e Writing 7Draft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation 52
    53. 53. A closer look at the ACT The proposed Math that goes into the ACT calculation Suppose you have a school with 5 students…. of Student Sum then Scores “The average sum of the 5 sub-tests across Matt 83 the school compared to the sum of the Mark 94 college-ready benchmarks” can be found Luke 75 by… John 79 1) Averaging the Summed Scores 83 + 94 + 75 +79 + 80 Paul 80 = 82.2 5 students 2) Dividing by summed college- ready benchmarks 82.2/92 = 89% and 89 pointsDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation 53
    54. 54. A closer look at the ACT Rationale for this suggested methodology: • Hold schools accountable for the degree to which their students are progressing towards achieving benchmark (rather than a simple yes/no) • Will better differentiate grades • Possibility for pushback?Draft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation 54
    55. 55. Proposal for Addition of Growth • Using EVAAS Growth outcomes, adjust overall score based on EVAAS category – Exceeded Expected Growth: Add 10 points – Met Expected Growth: Add 5 points – Did Not Meet Growth: No pointsDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation 55
    56. 56. Proposal for Addition of Growth Rationale for this suggested methodology: • Incentivizes pursuit of growth • Can make a one-letter grade difference between school with similar status • Grades still mean something largely consistent and comparable for parentsDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation 56
    57. 57. Overall Grade • Elementary/Middle Schools – Single component – 100 point scale • High Schools – Five components 0-500 points – Divide by 5 to achieve a 100 point scale • In both cases, make the Growth Adjustment (0, 5 or 10 points)Draft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation 57
    58. 58. Overall Grade Scale A: 90-100 points B: 80-89 points C: 70-79 points D: 60-69 points F: Less than 60 pointsDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation 58
    59. 59. Overall Grade Sample High School X • Performance Composite 69 points • Algebra II/Integrated III 78 points • Graduation Rate 82 points • WorkKeys 84 points • ACT + 82 points Total Points 395vide by 5 to get points out of 100 395/5 = 79 Check Growth School Met Expected Growth Add Growth Points 79 + 5 = 84 points Determine Final Grade This School would receive a “B” 59 Draft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation
    60. 60. Simulated Grades Note: • This data is for discussion purposes only and is a draft based on this proposed operational model. It is only data to inform feedback. • Based on 2011-12 data. • We have the ability and will run different scenarios of the grading schema; however, we cannot change the indicators.Draft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation 60
    61. 61. Simulated Grades No Growth in Grade No Drop in Perf Comp 20% Drop in Perf Comp 30% Drop in Perf Comp Grade Elem High Elem High Elem High A 259 108 1 60 1 33 B 686 155 18 115 0 107 C 527 211 494 239 34 240 D 291 66 794 106 654 122 F 116 72 572 92 1190 110 With Growth in Grade No Drop in Perf Comp 20% Drop in Perf Comp 30% Drop in Perf Comp Grade Elem High Elem High Elem High A 475 158 8 104 1 77 B 604 176 177 151 10 139 C 459 158 549 192 233 204 D 233 48 680 75 669 89 F 108 72 465 90Draft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation 61966 103
    62. 62. Next Steps • Gather feedback across state – including now • Return to the General Assembly with an operational proposal in January 2013 per the requirement of the billDraft – March 2012. Check http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ready/resources/ for Updates to this Presentation 62

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