Traditional Preparations for the Vietnamese New Year

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Spearheading developments in the retail and housing sectors, Douglas Ebenstein serves as president of Eden Center, Inc. Douglas Ebenstein has directed major expansion efforts of a landmark Falls Church, Virginia, shopping destination that serves the needs of the Washington, DC, area’s Vietnamese-American community. In addition to his work for Eden Center, Doug Ebenstein is head of Capital Commercial Properties, Inc.

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Traditional Preparations for the Vietnamese New Year

  1. 1. By Douglas Ebenstein
  2. 2.  Spearheading developments in the retail and housing sectors, Douglas Ebenstein serves as president of Eden Center, Inc. Douglas Ebenstein has directed major expansion efforts of a landmark Falls Church, Virginia, shopping destination that serves the needs of the Washington, DC, area’s VietnameseAmerican community. In addition to his work for Eden Center, Doug Ebenstein is head of Capital Commercial Properties, Inc.
  3. 3.  One of the shopping center’s popular annual traditions is a flag-raising ceremony in late January that coincides with the Vietnamese New Year. Also known as Tet Nguyen Dan (or simply Tet), the holiday takes place a week after the Kitchen God is said to depart to heaven, where he gives a report on each household’s activities over the past year. This report influences what kind of fate will befall the family in the upcoming year.
  4. 4.  Hoping to appease the Kitchen God, many families place sweets near the fireplace at the time of his heavenly journey. The week before Tet, families also engage in a number of family activities that include cleaning ancestors’ graves and burning incense. Families decorate their residence with red “cau doi” banners, as well as festive kumquat and other symbolic plants.

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